England

TRAVEL GUIDE

Loading...
Read More

From medieval cathedrals to postmodern towers, from prehistoric stones to one-pub villages, England is a spectacular tribute to the strength—and flexibility—of tradition. In the capital city of London and beyond, you can explore grand manors and royal castles steeped in history, and also discover cutting-edge art, innovative cultural scenes, and trendy shops. Quintessentially English treasures like the Georgian town of Bath, academic Oxford, and eccentric Brighton remain vibrant, and silvery lakes and green hills provide enduring grace notes.

Find a Hotel

Filter By:

London

History and tradition greet you at every turn in London; it's also one of the coolest, most modern cities in the world. If London contained...

Manchester

Central Manchester is alive with the vibe of cutting-edge popular music and a swank, often fancy café, cocktail bar, and restaurant culture...

Liverpool

A city lined with one of the most famous waterfronts in England, celebrated around the world as the birthplace of the Beatles, and still the...

Bath

In Bath, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, you’re surrounded by magnificent 18th-century architecture, a lasting reminder of a vanished world often...

Oxford

With arguably the most famous university in the world, Oxford has been a center of learning since 1167, with only the Sorbonne preceding it...

Cambridge

With the spires of its university buildings framed by towering trees and expansive meadows, and its medieval streets and passages enhanced by...

Birmingham

Though not the United Kingdom’s most visually appealing city—thanks to the decline of heavy industry, bombing during World War II, and some...

Stratford-upon-Avon

Even under the weight of busloads of visitors, Stratford, on the banks of the slow-flowing River Avon, has somehow hung on to much of its ancient...

Brighton

For more than 200 years, Brighton has been England's most interesting seaside city, and today it’s more vibrant, eccentric, and cosmopolitan...

York

For many people, the first stop in Yorkshire is the historic cathedral city of York. Much of the city's medieval and 18th-century architecture...

Canterbury

Just mention Canterbury and most people are taken back to memories of high-school English classes and Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales,...

Leeds

Once an industrial powerhouse, Leeds has reinvented itself as a vibrant dining, drinking, and shopping destination with numerous trendy restaurants...

Salisbury

The silhouette of Salisbury Cathedral's majestic spire signals your approach to this historic city long before you arrive. Although the cathedral...

Exeter

Exeter has been the capital of the region since the Romans established a fortress here 2,000 years ago, and evidence of the Roman occupation...

Bristol

The West Country's biggest city (population 430,000), Bristol has in recent years become one of the country's most vibrant centers, with a thriving...

Winchester

Winchester is among the most historic of English cities, and as you walk the graceful streets and wander the many public gardens, a sense of...

Norwich

It used to be said that Norwich had a pub for each day of the year and a church in which to repent every Sunday. Although this is no longer...

Windermere and Bowness-on-Windermere

For a natural touring base for the southern half of the Lake District, you don't need to look much farther than Windermere, though it does get...

Cheltenham

Although Cheltenham has acquired a reputation as snooty—the population (around 110,000) is generally well-heeled and conservative—it's also...

Newcastle upon Tyne

Durham may have the glories of its castle, cathedral, and university, but the liveliest city of the Northeast is Newcastle, currently reinventing...

Windsor

Only a small part of old Windsor—the settlement that grew up around the town's famous castle in the Middle Ages—has survived. The town isn't...

Durham

The great medieval city of Durham, seat of County Durham, stands dramatically on a rocky spur, overlooking the countryside. Its cathedral and...

Keswick

The great mountains of Skiddaw and Blencathra brood over the gray slate houses of Keswick (pronounced kezz -ick), on the scenic shores of...

Rye

With cobbled streets and ancient timbered dwellings, Rye is an artist's dream. It was an important port town until the harbor silted up and...

Lewes

The town nearest to the celebrated Glyndebourne Opera House, Lewes is so rich in history that the Council for British Archaeology has named...

Plymouth

Devon's largest city has long been linked with England's commercial and maritime history. The Pilgrims sailed from here to the New World in...

Isle of Wight

Drawn by the island’s slightly old-fashioned and unspoiled feel, throngs of visitors flock to the 23-mile-long Isle of Wight (pronounced white...

Bury St. Edmunds

The Georgian streetscape helps make the town one of the area's prettiest, and the nearby Greene King Westgate Brewery adds the smell of sweet...

Penrith

The red-sandstone town of Penrith was the capital of old Cumbria, part of the Scottish kingdom of Strathclyde in the 9th and 10th centuries...

Guildford

Guildford, the largest town in Surrey and the county's capital, has a lovely historic center with charming original storefronts. Gabled merchants...

Whitby

A fishing port with a Gothic edge (it is host to an annual Goth Weekend), Whitby is also a busy tourist hub, but it handles the crowds so well...

Chester

Cheshire’s thriving center is Chester, a city similar in some ways to Shrewsbury, though it has many more black-and-white half-timber buildings...

Chipping Campden

Undoubtedly one of the most beautiful towns in the area, Chipping Campden, with its population of about 2,500, is the Cotswolds in a microcosm...

Portsmouth

In addition to a historic harbor and revitalized waterfront, Portsmouth has the energy of a working port. At Gunwharf Quays is the soaring Spinnaker...

Dorchester

The traditional market town of Dorchester was immortalized as Casterbridge by Thomas Hardy in his 19th-century novel The Mayor of Casterbridge...

Lincoln

Celts, Romans, and Danes all had important settlements here, but it was the Normans who gave Lincoln its medieval stature after William the...

Cirencester

A hub of the Cotswolds since Roman times, when it was called Corinium, Cirencester (pronounced siren- sester) was second only to London in...

Shrewsbury

One of England’s most important medieval towns, Shrewsbury (pronounced shrose -bury), the county seat of Shropshire, lies within a great horseshoe...

Ambleside

Unlike Kendal and Windermere, Ambleside seems almost part of the hills and fells. Its buildings, mainly of local stone and many built in the...

St. Albans

A lively town on the outskirts of London, St. Albans is known for its historic cathedral, and it also holds reminders of a long history. From...

Buxton

Just outside the national park yet almost entirely surrounded by it, Buxton makes a good base for Peak District excursions but it has its own...

Grasmere

Lovely Grasmere, on a tiny, wood-fringed lake, is made up of crooked lanes in which Westmorland slate–built cottages hold shops and galleries...

Royal Tunbridge Wells

Nobody much bothers with the "Royal" anymore, but Tunbridge Wells is no less regal because of it. Because of its wealth and political conservatism...

Tetbury

With about 5,300 inhabitants, Tetbury claims royal connections. Indeed, the soaring spire of the church that presides over this Elizabethan...

Chichester

The Romans founded Chichester, the capital city of West Sussex, on the low-lying plains between the wooded South Downs and the sea. The city...

Hastings

In the 19th century Hastings became one of England's most popular spa resorts. Tall Victorian row houses painted in lemony hues still cover...

Broadway

The Cotswold town to end all Cotswold towns, Broadway has become a favorite of day-trippers. William Morris first discovered the delights of...

Penzance

Superb views over Mount's Bay are one lure of this popular, unpretentious seaside resort. Even though it does get very crowded in summer, Penzance...

Coniston

This small lake resort and boating center attracts climbers to the steep peak of the Old Man of Coniston (2,635 feet), which towers above...

Lyndhurst

Lyndhurst is famous as the capital of the New Forest. Although some popular spots can get crowded in summer, there are ample parking lots, picnic...

Kendal

The southern gateway to the Lake District is the "Auld Gray Town" of Kendal, outside the national park and less touristy than the towns to the...

Aldeburgh

Aldeburgh (pronounced orl -bruh) is a quiet seaside resort, except in June, when the town fills with people attending the noted Aldeburgh Festival...

Hexham

The area around the busy market town of Hexham is a popular base for visiting Hadrian's Wall. Just a few miles from the most significant remains...

Wells

England's smallest cathedral city, with a population of 10,000, lies at the foot of the Mendip Hills. Although set in what feels like a quiet...

St. Ives

James McNeill Whistler came here to paint his landscapes, Barbara Hepworth to fashion her modernist sculptures, and Virginia Woolf to write...

Harrogate

During the Regency and early Victorian periods, it became fashionable for the aristocratic and wealthy to "take the waters" at British spa towns...

Lavenham

Virtually unchanged since the height of its wealth in the 15th and 16th centuries, Lavenham is one of the most perfectly preserved examples...

Bakewell

In Bakewell, a medieval bridge crosses the winding River Wye in five graceful arches; a 9th-century Saxon cross that stands outside the parish...

Southampton

Southampton is England's leading passenger port. It is rich in historic embarkations, from Henry V's fleet bound for France and the battle of...

Hereford

Before 1066 Hereford was the capital of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Mercia and, earlier still, the site of Roman, Celtic, and Iron Age settlements...

Haworth: Heart of Bronte Country

Whatever Haworth might have been in the past, today it’s Brontë country. This old stone-built textile village on the edge of the Yorkshire Moors...

Scarborough

There’s no Scarborough Fair, and historians are divided on whether there ever was one, but don't let that stop you from heading to this classic...

Henley-on-Thames

Henley's fame is based on one thing: rowing. The Henley Royal Regatta, held at the cusp of June and July on a long, straight stretch of the...

Bourton-on-the-Water

Off A429 on the eastern edge of the Cotswolds, Bourton-on-the-Water is deservedly famous as a classic Cotswold village. Like many others, it...

Glastonbury

A town steeped in history, myth, and legend, Glastonbury lies in the lea of Glastonbury Tor, a grassy hill rising 520 feet above the drained...

Lyme Regis

A very strange stranger it must be, who does not see the charms of the immediate environs of Lyme, to make him wish to know it better," wrote...

Great Malvern

Great Malvern feels a bit like a seaside resort, though instead of the ocean your eyes plunge into an expanse of green meadows rolling away...

Ludlow

Medieval, Georgian, and Victorian buildings jostle for attention in pretty Ludlow, which has a finer display of black-and-white half-timber...

Padstow

A small fishing port at the mouth of the River Camel, Padstow attracts attention and visitors as a center of culinary excellence, largely because...

Castleton

The area around Castleton, in the Hope Valley, contains the most famous manifestations of the geology of the Peak District. A number of caves...

Hawkshead

In the Vale of Esthwaite, this small market town is a pleasing hodgepodge of tiny squares, cobbled lanes, and whitewashed houses. There's a...

Skipton

Skipton in Airedale, capital of the limestone district of Craven, is a country market town with as many farmers as visitors milling in the streets...

Warwick

Most famous for Warwick Castle—that vision out of the feudal ages—the town of Warwick (pronounced war -ick) is an interesting architectural...

Rochester

Positioned near the confluence of the Thames and the River Medway, this posh town has a history of Roman, Saxon, and Norman occupation, all...

Wells-next-the-Sea

A quiet base from which to explore other nearby towns, the harbor town of Wells-next-the-Sea and the nearby coastline remain untouched, with...

Torquay

The most important resort area in South Devon, Torquay envisions itself as the center of the "English Riviera." Since 1968 the towns of Paignton...

Matlock

In the heart of the Derbyshire Dales just outside Peak District National Park, Matlock and its near neighbor Matlock Bath are former spa towns...

Dedham

Dedham is the heart of Constable country. Here gentle hills and the cornfields of Dedham Vale, set under the district's delicate, pale skies...

Lynton and Lynmouth

A steep hill separates this pretty pair of Devonshire villages, which are linked by a Victorian cliff railway you can still ride. Lynmouth,...

Avebury

The village of Avebury was built much later than its famous stone circles; it has an informative museum with an outstanding collection of Bronze...

Dover

The busy passenger port of Dover has for centuries been Britain's gateway to Europe and is known for the famous white cliffs. The town itself...

Morpeth

Surrounded by idyllic pastures and tiny lanes, the hilly medieval market town of Morpeth is the closest thing this part of Northumberland comes...

Ullswater

Hemmed in by towering hills, Ullswater, the region's second-largest lake, is one of the least developed, drawing people for its calm waters...

Colchester

Evidence of Colchester's four centuries of Roman history is visible everywhere in this ancient town. The Roman walls still stand, together with...

Porlock

Buried at the bottom of a valley, with the slopes of Exmoor all about, the small, unspoiled town of Porlock lies near "Doone Country," the setting...

Totnes

This busy market town on the banks of the River Dart preserves plenty of its medieval past, and on summer Tuesdays vendors dress in period costume...

Alnwick

Dominated by a grand castle, the little market town of Alnwick (pronounced ahn -ick) is the best base from which to explore the dramatic coast...

Richmond

Tucked into a bend above the foaming River Swale, Richmond has a picturesque network of narrow Georgian streets and terraces opening onto a...

Bournemouth

Bournemouth has 7 miles of beaches, and the waters are said to be some of southern England's most pristine. The resort was founded in 1810 by...

Falmouth

The bustle of this resort town's fishing harbor, yachting center, and commercial port only adds to its charm. In the 18th century Falmouth was...

Stow-on-the-Wold

At an elevation of 800 feet, Stow is the highest town in the Cotswolds—“Stow-on-the-Wold, where the wind blows cold" is the age-old saying....

Arundel

The little hilltop town of Arundel is dominated by its great castle, the much-restored home of the dukes of Norfolk for more than 700 years...

Fowey

Nestled in the mouth of a wooded estuary, Fowey (pronounced Foy) is still very much a working china-clay port as well as a focal point for the...

Cockermouth

This small but bustling town, at the confluence of the rivers Derwent and Cocker, has colorful buildings, history, and narrow streets that are...

Ripon

Said to be England’s second-oldest city and still one of its smallest, Ripon has been the site of a market since the 10th century, and probably...

Greenhead

In and around tiny Greenhead you'll find a wealth of historical sites related to Hadrian's Wall, including the fascinating Housesteads Roman...

Tavistock and Environs

On the River Tavy, the ancient town of Tavistock historically owed its importance to its Benedictine abbey (dissolved by Henry VIII in the 16th...

Exmoor National Park

When you're headed to Exmoor National Park, stop by the visitor information centers at Dulverton, Dunster, and Lynmouth for information and...

Moreton-in-Marsh

In Moreton-in-Marsh, the houses have been built not around a central square but along a street wide enough to accommodate a market. The village...

Winchcombe

The sleepy, unspoiled village of Winchcombe (population 4,500), once the capital of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Mercia, has some attractive half...

Dartmouth

An important port in the Middle Ages, Dartmouth is today a favorite haunt of yacht owners. Traces of its past include the old houses in Bayard...

Wimborne Minster

The impressive minster of this quiet market town makes it seem like a miniature cathedral city. The town is exceptionally quiet on Sunday. ...

Chagford

Once a tin-weighing station, Chagford was an area of fierce fighting between the Roundheads and the Cavaliers during the English Civil War....

Stoke-on-Trent

Just west of the Peak District, the area known as the Potteries is still the center of Britain's ceramics industry, though production is increasingly...

King's Lynn

As Bishop's Lynn, the town thrived as a port on the River Ouse, growing prosperous in the 15th century through the wool trade and other trade...

Corfe Castle

The village of Corfe Castle is best known for the ancient, ruined castle that overlooks it. ...

Woodbridge

One of the first good ports of call on the Suffolk Heritage Coast, Woodbridge is a town whose upper reaches center on a fine old market square...

Blakeney

The Norfolk coast begins to feel wild and remote near Blakeney, 14 miles west of Cromer. Driving the coast road from Cromer, you pass marshes...

Hadrian's Wall

The most important Roman relic in Britain extends across the countryside and can be accessed in many ways. In Northumberland National Park,...

Okehampton

This town at the confluence of the rivers East and West Okement is a good base for exploring north Dartmoor. It has a fascinating museum dedicated...

Ironbridge Gorge

The River Severn and its tree-cloaked banks make an attractive backdrop to this cluster of villages; within a mile of the graceful span of the...

Ledbury

Among the 16th-century black-and-white half-timber buildings in the center of Ledbury, take special note of the Feathers Hotel and the Talbot...

Battle

Battle is the actual site of the crucial Battle of Hastings, at which, on October 14, 1066, William of Normandy and his army trounced King Harold...

Barnard Castle

The handsome market town of Barnard Castle has sights of its own and can also serve as a base for venturing into the Teesdale Valley to the...

Ross-on-Wye

Perched high above the River Wye in the Malvern Hills, Ross-on-Wye seems oblivious to modern-day intrusions and remains at heart a small market...

Ely

Known for its magnificent cathedral, Ely is the "capital" of the fens, the center of what used to be a separate county called the Isle of Ely...

Cartmel

The village of Cartmel is the southern Lakeland area's most attractive, set in a gentler Cumbrian landscape of hills and fields beyond the trees...

Sherborne

Originally the capital of Wessex (the actual Saxon kingdom, not Hardy’s retro conceit), this unspoiled market town is populated with medieval...

Lydford

The sequestered hamlet of Lydford packs a lot into a small area: there's the dramatic scenery of the gorge just outside the village, the remains...

Woodstock and Blenheim Palace

Handsome 17th- and 18th-century houses line the trim streets of Woodstock, at the eastern edge of the Cotswolds. It's best known for nearby...

Borrowdale

South of Keswick and its lake lies the valley of Borrowdale, whose varied landscape of green valley floor and surrounding crags has long been...

Helmsley

The market town of Helmsley, with its flowering window boxes, stone cottages, churchyard, and arched bridges leading across streams, is the...

Burford

Burford's broad main street leads steeply down to a narrow bridge across the River Windrush. The village served as a stagecoach stop for centuries...

St. Mawes

At the tip of the Roseland Peninsula is the quiet, unspoiled village of St. Mawes, where subtropical plants thrive. The peninsula itself is...

Aylesbury

Aylesbury makes a good base for exploring the surrounding countryside, including stately homes and gardens. It's a pretty, historic place with...

Robin Hood's Bay

With red-roof cottages and cobbled roads squeezed into a narrow ravine, this tiny fishing village is considered by many to be the prettiest...

Sissinghurst Castle Garden

Impeccable literary credentials go hand in hand with enchanting grounds, magnificent countryside views, and even a working kitchen garden at...

Southwold

This seaside town is an idyllic place to spend a day. The old-fashioned beach huts that huddle together against the wind on the shingle beach...

Long Melford

It's easy to see how this village got its name, especially if you walk the full length of its 2-mile-long main street, which gradually broadens...

Northleach

Just off the Fosse Way (and bypassed by the busy A40), little Northleach—population around 2,000—has remained one of the least spoiled of Cotswold...

Abbotsbury

Pretty Abbotsbury is at the western end of Chesil Beach and has a swannery. In other parts of the village, you can also visit a children's farm...

Broadstairs

Like other Victorian seaside towns such as Margate and Ramsgate, Broadstairs was once the playground of vacationing Londoners, and grand 19th...

Faversham

In Roman times Faversham was a thriving seaport. Today the port is long gone, and all that’s left is a waterway at the edge of town known as...

Painswick

An old Cotswold wool town of around 2,000 inhabitants, Painswick has become a chocolate-box picture of quaintness, attracting day-trippers and...

Bishop Auckland

For 700 years, between the 12th and 19th century, the powerful prince-bishops of Durham had their country residence in Auckland Castle, in the...

Edale

At Edale, an extremely popular hiking center, you're truly in the Peak District wilds. This sleepy, straggling village, in the shadow of Mam...

Weymouth

West Dorset's main coastal resort, Weymouth, is known for its sandy and pebble beaches and its royal connections. King George III began seawater...

Cowes

If you embark from Southampton, your ferry crosses the Solent channel and docks at Cowes, near Queen Victoria's Osborne House. Cowes is a magic...

Newquay

The biggest, most developed resort on the north Cornwall coast is a fairly large town established in 1439. It was once the center of the trade...

Eton

Some observers may find it symbolic that almost opposite Windsor Castle—which embodies the continuity of the royal tradition—stands Eton, a...

Saltaire

This planned community, built by a philanthropic Victorian industrialist in the wool trade to house his workers, perfectly preserves the architecture...

Ryde

The town of Ryde has long been one of the Isle of Wight's most popular summer resorts with several family attractions. After the construction...

Truro

The county seat and Cornwall's only real city, Truro is a good option mostly for food and shopping and for cathedral and museum buffs. For an...

Henley-in-Arden

A brief drive out of Stratford will take you under the Stratford-upon-Avon Canal aqueduct to pretty Henley-in-Arden, whose wide main street...

Bewdley

...

Chawton

In Chawton you can visit the home of Jane Austen (1775–1817), who lived the last eight years of her life in the village, moving to Winchester...

Cliveden

This grand stately home, designed by Charles Barry, the architect of the Houses of Parliament, and the setting of the notorious Profumo affair...

Bridlington

A fishing port settled since Roman times and probably long before, Bridlington is less upmarket than some other Yorkshire seaside resorts, although...

Bolton Abbey

A leafy, picturesque village amid the rolling hills of the Yorkshire Dales, Bolton Abbey is a famously attractive town with a stone church and...

Ascot

The posh town of Ascot (pronounced as -cut) has for centuries been famous for horse racing and for style. Queen Anne chose to have a racecourse...

Deal

The large seaside town of Deal, known for its castle, is famous in history books as the place where Caesar's legions landed in 55 BC, and it...

Land's End

The coastal road, B3306, ends at the western tip of Britain at what is, quite literally, Land's End. ...

Elterwater and the Langdales

The delightful village of Elterwater, at the eastern end of the Great Langdale Valley on B5343, is a good stop for hikers. It's barely more...

Tintagel

The romance of Arthurian legend thrives around Tintagel's ruined castle on the coast. Ever since the somewhat unreliable 12th-century chronicler...

Longleat House

With its popular safari park and a richly decorated High Elizabethan house to explore, Longleat can provide a day of diversions. ...

Marlow

Just inside the Buckinghamshire border, Marlow and the surrounding area overflow with Thames-side prettiness. The unusual suspension bridge...

Dunster

Lying between the Somerset coast and the edge of Exmoor National Park, Dunster is a picture-book village with a broad main street. The eight...

Berwick-upon-Tweed

Although Berwick-upon-Tweed now lies just inside the border of England, historians estimate that it’s changed hands between the Scots and the...

Bamburgh

Tiny Bamburgh has a splendid castle, and several beaches are a few minutes' walk away. ...

Bodmin

Bodmin was the only Cornish town recorded in the 11th-century Domesday Book, William the Conqueror's census. During World War I, the Domesday...

Bibury

The tiny town of Bibury, with a population of less than 1,000, sits idyllically beside the little River Coln on B4425; it was famed Arts and...

Lindisfarne (Holy Island)

Cradle of northern England's Christianity and home of St. Cuthbert, Lindisfarne (or Holy Island) has a religious history that dates from AD...

Kenilworth Castle

The sprawling, graceful red ruins of Kenilworth Castle loom over the green fields of Warwickshire, surrounded by the low grassy impression of...

Brading

The Anglo-Norman St. Mary's Church in Brading dates back to 1180. It contains the tombs of the Oglanders, a local family whose Norman ancestor...

Dartmoor National Park

Devon presents no greater contrast to the country's quaint and picturesque image than the bleak, deserted expanses of Dartmoor. Southern England...

Clovelly

Lovely Clovelly always seems to have the sun shining on its flower-lined cottages and stepped and cobbled streets. Alas, its beauty is well...

Stourhead

England has many memorable gardens, but Stourhead is one of the most glorious. Its centerpiece is a magnificent artificial lake surrounded by...

Alum Bay and the Needles

At the western tip of the Isle of Wight is the island's most famous natural landmark, the Needles, a long line of jagged chalk stacks jutting...

Boscastle

In tranquil Boscastle, some of the stone-and-slate cottages at the foot of the steep valley date from the 1300s. A good place to relax and walk...

Woburn Abbey

A stunning drive through the deer park at Woburn Abbey leads to a superb art collection within a Georgian mansion and roaming wildlife in a...

Althorp

Althorp, known as the childhood home and burial place of Princess Diana, has fine architecture and paintings, both Old Masters and new. ...

Lower Slaughter and Upper Slaughter

To see the quieter, more typical Cotswold villages, seek out the evocatively named Lower Slaughter and Upper Slaughter (the names have nothing...

Ventnor

The south-coast resorts are the sunniest and most sheltered on the Isle of Wight. Handsome Ventnor rises from such a steep slope that the ground...

Penshurst Place

One of the best preserved of the great medieval houses in Britain, and surrounded by stunning landscaped gardens, Penshurst Place is like an...

Orford

Part of the Suffolk Heritage Coast, a 40-mile stretch that runs from Felixstowe northward to Kessingland, ancient Orford is a beautiful example...

Stamford

Serene, honey-hued Stamford, on a hillside overlooking the River Welland, has a well-preserved center, in part because in 1967 it was designated...

Lacock

Owned by the National Trust, this lovely Wiltshire village is the victim of its own charm, its unspoiled gabled and stone-tile cottages drawing...

Trelissick

Trelissick is known for the colorful Trelissick Garden, owned by the National Trust. ...

Much Wenlock

Much Wenlock, a town on the A458, is full of half-timber buildings, including a 16th-century guildhall. Nearby are popular places to walk. The...

Bassenthwaite Lake

Bassenthwaite is the only body of water officially called a lake in the Lake District; the others are known as "meres" or "waters." Bird-watchers...

Hawes

The best time to visit the so-called cheesiest town in Yorkshire is on Tuesday, when farmers crowd into town for the weekly market. Crumbly...

Cerne Abbas

The village of Cerne Abbas, worth a short exploration on foot, has some Tudor houses on the road beside the church. Nearby you can also see...

Launceston

Cornwall's ancient capital, Launceston, on the eastern side of Bodmin Moor, retains parts of its medieval walls, including the South Gate. ...

Danby

The old stone village of Danby nestles in the green Esk Valley, a short walk from the summit of the moors. It's been settled since Viking times...

Beaulieu

The unspoiled village of Beaulieu (pronounced byoo -lee) has three major attractions in one at Beaulieu Abbey and is near the museum village...

Rydal

The village of Rydal, on the small glacial lake called Rydal Water, is rich with Wordsworthian associations. ...

Castle Combe

This Wiltshire village lived a sleepy existence until 1962, when it was voted the "prettiest village" in England—without any of its inhabitants...

Topsham

This small town, full of narrow streets and hidden courtyards, was once a bustling river port, and it remains rich in 18th-century houses and inns. ...

Mousehole

Between Land's End and Penzance, Mousehole (pronounced mow -zel, the first syllable rhyming with "cow") merits a stop—and plenty of people...

Sudbury

An early silk-weaving industry (still in existence, on a smaller scale) as well as the wool trade brought prosperity to Sudbury, which has three...

Runnymede

...

Chartwell

Beloved of Winston Churchill, Chartwell retains a homely warmth despite its size and grandeur. Almost as lovely are the grounds, with a rose...

Port Isaac

A mixture of granite, slate, and whitewashed cottages tumbles precipitously down the cliff to the tiny harbor at Port Isaac, still dedicated...

Burwash

Burwash, a pretty Sussex village, is known for its association with writer Rudyard Kipling. The setting for Kipling's Puck of Pook's Hill ...

Dunstanburgh Castle

Dunstanburgh is as dramatic an old ruin as they come, and more than worth the effort it takes to get here (this is not the kind of place where...

East Grinstead

The small country town of East Grinstead claims the longest continuous run of 14th-century timber-frame buildings in the country. Six miles...

Rothbury

The small market town of Rothbury, surrounded by stunning countryside, was originally developed as a Victorian resort, attracting the gentry...

Washington

The little town of Washington has a direct link to the history of the United States. ...

Farne Islands

Owned by the National Trust, these bleak, wind-tossed islands are home to several seabirds, including puffins and guillemots. ...

Leeds Castle

Every inch the grand medieval castle, Leeds is like a storybook illustration of what an English castle should look like—from the fortresslike...

Beer

Beer, just outside Seaton, was once a favorite smugglers' haunt, and the fishing village has remained fairly unchanged. It was the source of...

Stonehenge

Almost five millennia after their construction, these stone circles on the Salisbury Plain continue to pose fascinating questions. How were...

Lizard Peninsula

The southernmost point on mainland Britain, this peninsula is a government-designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, named so for the rocky...

Thirsk

This busy market town on the western edge of the moors was once an important coaching stop on the main east–west route from the dales to the...

Hutton-le-Hole

Sleepy Hutton-le-Hole is a charming little place based around a wide village green, with woolly sheep snoozing in the shade of stone cottages...

Dorchester-on-Thames

An important center in Saxon times, when it was the seat of a bishopric, Dorchester merits a visit chiefly because of its ancient abbey, but...

Peterborough

...

Knaresborough

At the bottom of a precipitously deep, rocky gorge along the River Nidd, the little town of Knaresborough could hardly be more photogenic. It...

Coventry

...

Ightham Mote

Almost unique among medieval manor houses in that it still has a moat (although that has nothing to do with the name), Ightham is a captivating...

Castle Howard

The baroque grandeur of Castle Howard is without equal in northern England. The grounds, enhanced by groves of trees, a twinkling lake, and...

Hever Castle

A fairy-tale medieval castle on the outside, and a Tudor mansion within, Hever contains layer on layer of history. It’s one of the most unusual...

Knole

Perhaps the quintessential Tudor mansion, Knole is as famous for its literary connections and impressive collection of furniture and tapestries...

Honiton

...

Montacute House

...

Sandwich

The coast near Canterbury holds three of the ancient Cinque Ports , a confederacy of ports along the southeast seaboard whose heyday lasted...

Blandford Forum

Boasting what is perhaps the handsomest Georgian town center in the South of England, this market town of brick and stone on the River Stour...

Perranporth

Past the sandy shores of Perran Bay, Perranporth is one of Cornwall's most popular seaside spots and becomes extremely busy in high season,...

Sonning-on-Thames

It’s plausible that Sonning's reputation as the prettiest village on the Thames goes back as far as its Saxon bishops. The 18th-century bridge...

Owlpen

...

Helston

...

Yeovilton

...

Cadbury Castle

...

Askrigg

...

Romsey

...

Great Bookham

Fine old buildings fill Great Bookham, including a well-preserved 12th-century church. ...

London

History and tradition greet you at every turn in London; it's also one of the coolest, most modern cities in the world. If London contained...

Manchester

Central Manchester is alive with the vibe of cutting-edge popular music and a swank, often fancy café, cocktail bar, and restaurant culture...

Liverpool

A city lined with one of the most famous waterfronts in England, celebrated around the world as the birthplace of the Beatles, and still the...

Bath

In Bath, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, you’re surrounded by magnificent 18th-century architecture, a lasting reminder of a vanished world often...

Oxford

With arguably the most famous university in the world, Oxford has been a center of learning since 1167, with only the Sorbonne preceding it...

Cambridge

With the spires of its university buildings framed by towering trees and expansive meadows, and its medieval streets and passages enhanced by...

Birmingham

Though not the United Kingdom’s most visually appealing city—thanks to the decline of heavy industry, bombing during World War II, and some...

Stratford-upon-Avon

Even under the weight of busloads of visitors, Stratford, on the banks of the slow-flowing River Avon, has somehow hung on to much of its ancient...

Brighton

For more than 200 years, Brighton has been England's most interesting seaside city, and today it’s more vibrant, eccentric, and cosmopolitan...

York

For many people, the first stop in Yorkshire is the historic cathedral city of York. Much of the city's medieval and 18th-century architecture...

Canterbury

Just mention Canterbury and most people are taken back to memories of high-school English classes and Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales,...

Leeds

Once an industrial powerhouse, Leeds has reinvented itself as a vibrant dining, drinking, and shopping destination with numerous trendy restaurants...

Salisbury

The silhouette of Salisbury Cathedral's majestic spire signals your approach to this historic city long before you arrive. Although the cathedral...

Exeter

Exeter has been the capital of the region since the Romans established a fortress here 2,000 years ago, and evidence of the Roman occupation...

Bristol

The West Country's biggest city (population 430,000), Bristol has in recent years become one of the country's most vibrant centers, with a thriving...

Winchester

Winchester is among the most historic of English cities, and as you walk the graceful streets and wander the many public gardens, a sense of...

Cheltenham

Although Cheltenham has acquired a reputation as snooty—the population (around 110,000) is generally well-heeled and conservative—it's also...

Norwich

It used to be said that Norwich had a pub for each day of the year and a church in which to repent every Sunday. Although this is no longer...

Windermere and Bowness-on-Windermere

For a natural touring base for the southern half of the Lake District, you don't need to look much farther than Windermere, though it does get...

Windsor

Only a small part of old Windsor—the settlement that grew up around the town's famous castle in the Middle Ages—has survived. The town isn't...

Newcastle upon Tyne

Durham may have the glories of its castle, cathedral, and university, but the liveliest city of the Northeast is Newcastle, currently reinventing...

Durham

The great medieval city of Durham, seat of County Durham, stands dramatically on a rocky spur, overlooking the countryside. Its cathedral and...

Keswick

The great mountains of Skiddaw and Blencathra brood over the gray slate houses of Keswick (pronounced kezz -ick), on the scenic shores of...

Rye

With cobbled streets and ancient timbered dwellings, Rye is an artist's dream. It was an important port town until the harbor silted up and...

Lewes

The town nearest to the celebrated Glyndebourne Opera House, Lewes is so rich in history that the Council for British Archaeology has named...

Plymouth

Devon's largest city has long been linked with England's commercial and maritime history. The Pilgrims sailed from here to the New World in...

Guildford

Guildford, the largest town in Surrey and the county's capital, has a lovely historic center with charming original storefronts. Gabled merchants...

Penrith

The red-sandstone town of Penrith was the capital of old Cumbria, part of the Scottish kingdom of Strathclyde in the 9th and 10th centuries...

Bury St. Edmunds

The Georgian streetscape helps make the town one of the area's prettiest, and the nearby Greene King Westgate Brewery adds the smell of sweet...

Whitby

A fishing port with a Gothic edge (it is host to an annual Goth Weekend), Whitby is also a busy tourist hub, but it handles the crowds so well...

Chester

Cheshire’s thriving center is Chester, a city similar in some ways to Shrewsbury, though it has many more black-and-white half-timber buildings...

Cirencester

A hub of the Cotswolds since Roman times, when it was called Corinium, Cirencester (pronounced siren- sester) was second only to London in...

Chipping Campden

Undoubtedly one of the most beautiful towns in the area, Chipping Campden, with its population of about 2,500, is the Cotswolds in a microcosm...

Portsmouth

In addition to a historic harbor and revitalized waterfront, Portsmouth has the energy of a working port. At Gunwharf Quays is the soaring Spinnaker...

Dorchester

The traditional market town of Dorchester was immortalized as Casterbridge by Thomas Hardy in his 19th-century novel The Mayor of Casterbridge...

Lincoln

Celts, Romans, and Danes all had important settlements here, but it was the Normans who gave Lincoln its medieval stature after William the...

Ambleside

Unlike Kendal and Windermere, Ambleside seems almost part of the hills and fells. Its buildings, mainly of local stone and many built in the...

Shrewsbury

One of England’s most important medieval towns, Shrewsbury (pronounced shrose -bury), the county seat of Shropshire, lies within a great horseshoe...

Grasmere

Lovely Grasmere, on a tiny, wood-fringed lake, is made up of crooked lanes in which Westmorland slate–built cottages hold shops and galleries...

St. Albans

A lively town on the outskirts of London, St. Albans is known for its historic cathedral, and it also holds reminders of a long history. From...

Royal Tunbridge Wells

Nobody much bothers with the "Royal" anymore, but Tunbridge Wells is no less regal because of it. Because of its wealth and political conservatism...

Buxton

Just outside the national park yet almost entirely surrounded by it, Buxton makes a good base for Peak District excursions but it has its own...

Tetbury

With about 5,300 inhabitants, Tetbury claims royal connections. Indeed, the soaring spire of the church that presides over this Elizabethan...

Penzance

Superb views over Mount's Bay are one lure of this popular, unpretentious seaside resort. Even though it does get very crowded in summer, Penzance...

Coniston

This small lake resort and boating center attracts climbers to the steep peak of the Old Man of Coniston (2,635 feet), which towers above...

Broadway

The Cotswold town to end all Cotswold towns, Broadway has become a favorite of day-trippers. William Morris first discovered the delights of...

Chichester

The Romans founded Chichester, the capital city of West Sussex, on the low-lying plains between the wooded South Downs and the sea. The city...

Hastings

In the 19th century Hastings became one of England's most popular spa resorts. Tall Victorian row houses painted in lemony hues still cover...

St. Ives

James McNeill Whistler came here to paint his landscapes, Barbara Hepworth to fashion her modernist sculptures, and Virginia Woolf to write...

Hexham

The area around the busy market town of Hexham is a popular base for visiting Hadrian's Wall. Just a few miles from the most significant remains...

Aldeburgh

Aldeburgh (pronounced orl -bruh) is a quiet seaside resort, except in June, when the town fills with people attending the noted Aldeburgh Festival...

Wells

England's smallest cathedral city, with a population of 10,000, lies at the foot of the Mendip Hills. Although set in what feels like a quiet...

Kendal

The southern gateway to the Lake District is the "Auld Gray Town" of Kendal, outside the national park and less touristy than the towns to the...

Harrogate

During the Regency and early Victorian periods, it became fashionable for the aristocratic and wealthy to "take the waters" at British spa towns...

Lyndhurst

Lyndhurst is famous as the capital of the New Forest. Although some popular spots can get crowded in summer, there are ample parking lots, picnic...

Lavenham

Virtually unchanged since the height of its wealth in the 15th and 16th centuries, Lavenham is one of the most perfectly preserved examples...

Glastonbury

A town steeped in history, myth, and legend, Glastonbury lies in the lea of Glastonbury Tor, a grassy hill rising 520 feet above the drained...

Hereford

Before 1066 Hereford was the capital of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Mercia and, earlier still, the site of Roman, Celtic, and Iron Age settlements...

Haworth: Heart of Bronte Country

Whatever Haworth might have been in the past, today it’s Brontë country. This old stone-built textile village on the edge of the Yorkshire Moors...

Scarborough

There’s no Scarborough Fair, and historians are divided on whether there ever was one, but don't let that stop you from heading to this classic...

Bakewell

In Bakewell, a medieval bridge crosses the winding River Wye in five graceful arches; a 9th-century Saxon cross that stands outside the parish...

Southampton

Southampton is England's leading passenger port. It is rich in historic embarkations, from Henry V's fleet bound for France and the battle of...

Henley-on-Thames

Henley's fame is based on one thing: rowing. The Henley Royal Regatta, held at the cusp of June and July on a long, straight stretch of the...

Bourton-on-the-Water

Off A429 on the eastern edge of the Cotswolds, Bourton-on-the-Water is deservedly famous as a classic Cotswold village. Like many others, it...

Lyme Regis

A very strange stranger it must be, who does not see the charms of the immediate environs of Lyme, to make him wish to know it better," wrote...

Ludlow

Medieval, Georgian, and Victorian buildings jostle for attention in pretty Ludlow, which has a finer display of black-and-white half-timber...

Warwick

Most famous for Warwick Castle—that vision out of the feudal ages—the town of Warwick (pronounced war -ick) is an interesting architectural...

Hawkshead

In the Vale of Esthwaite, this small market town is a pleasing hodgepodge of tiny squares, cobbled lanes, and whitewashed houses. There's a...

Castleton

The area around Castleton, in the Hope Valley, contains the most famous manifestations of the geology of the Peak District. A number of caves...

Skipton

Skipton in Airedale, capital of the limestone district of Craven, is a country market town with as many farmers as visitors milling in the streets...

Great Malvern

Great Malvern feels a bit like a seaside resort, though instead of the ocean your eyes plunge into an expanse of green meadows rolling away...

Padstow

A small fishing port at the mouth of the River Camel, Padstow attracts attention and visitors as a center of culinary excellence, largely because...

Matlock

In the heart of the Derbyshire Dales just outside Peak District National Park, Matlock and its near neighbor Matlock Bath are former spa towns...

Morpeth

Surrounded by idyllic pastures and tiny lanes, the hilly medieval market town of Morpeth is the closest thing this part of Northumberland comes...

Wells-next-the-Sea

A quiet base from which to explore other nearby towns, the harbor town of Wells-next-the-Sea and the nearby coastline remain untouched, with...

Dover

The busy passenger port of Dover has for centuries been Britain's gateway to Europe and is known for the famous white cliffs. The town itself...

Lynton and Lynmouth

A steep hill separates this pretty pair of Devonshire villages, which are linked by a Victorian cliff railway you can still ride. Lynmouth,...

Torquay

The most important resort area in South Devon, Torquay envisions itself as the center of the "English Riviera." Since 1968 the towns of Paignton...

Rochester

Positioned near the confluence of the Thames and the River Medway, this posh town has a history of Roman, Saxon, and Norman occupation, all...

Dedham

Dedham is the heart of Constable country. Here gentle hills and the cornfields of Dedham Vale, set under the district's delicate, pale skies...

Avebury

The village of Avebury was built much later than its famous stone circles; it has an informative museum with an outstanding collection of Bronze...

Fowey

Nestled in the mouth of a wooded estuary, Fowey (pronounced Foy) is still very much a working china-clay port as well as a focal point for the...

Falmouth

The bustle of this resort town's fishing harbor, yachting center, and commercial port only adds to its charm. In the 18th century Falmouth was...

Totnes

This busy market town on the banks of the River Dart preserves plenty of its medieval past, and on summer Tuesdays vendors dress in period costume...

Alnwick

Dominated by a grand castle, the little market town of Alnwick (pronounced ahn -ick) is the best base from which to explore the dramatic coast...

Ullswater

Hemmed in by towering hills, Ullswater, the region's second-largest lake, is one of the least developed, drawing people for its calm waters...

Stow-on-the-Wold

At an elevation of 800 feet, Stow is the highest town in the Cotswolds—“Stow-on-the-Wold, where the wind blows cold" is the age-old saying....

Arundel

The little hilltop town of Arundel is dominated by its great castle, the much-restored home of the dukes of Norfolk for more than 700 years...

Colchester

Evidence of Colchester's four centuries of Roman history is visible everywhere in this ancient town. The Roman walls still stand, together with...

Bournemouth

Bournemouth has 7 miles of beaches, and the waters are said to be some of southern England's most pristine. The resort was founded in 1810 by...

Porlock

Buried at the bottom of a valley, with the slopes of Exmoor all about, the small, unspoiled town of Porlock lies near "Doone Country," the setting...

Richmond

Tucked into a bend above the foaming River Swale, Richmond has a picturesque network of narrow Georgian streets and terraces opening onto a...

Stoke-on-Trent

Just west of the Peak District, the area known as the Potteries is still the center of Britain's ceramics industry, though production is increasingly...

Cockermouth

This small but bustling town, at the confluence of the rivers Derwent and Cocker, has colorful buildings, history, and narrow streets that are...

Winchcombe

The sleepy, unspoiled village of Winchcombe (population 4,500), once the capital of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Mercia, has some attractive half...

Blakeney

The Norfolk coast begins to feel wild and remote near Blakeney, 14 miles west of Cromer. Driving the coast road from Cromer, you pass marshes...

Woodbridge

One of the first good ports of call on the Suffolk Heritage Coast, Woodbridge is a town whose upper reaches center on a fine old market square...

Greenhead

In and around tiny Greenhead you'll find a wealth of historical sites related to Hadrian's Wall, including the fascinating Housesteads Roman...

King's Lynn

As Bishop's Lynn, the town thrived as a port on the River Ouse, growing prosperous in the 15th century through the wool trade and other trade...

Moreton-in-Marsh

In Moreton-in-Marsh, the houses have been built not around a central square but along a street wide enough to accommodate a market. The village...

Tavistock and Environs

On the River Tavy, the ancient town of Tavistock historically owed its importance to its Benedictine abbey (dissolved by Henry VIII in the 16th...

Dartmouth

An important port in the Middle Ages, Dartmouth is today a favorite haunt of yacht owners. Traces of its past include the old houses in Bayard...

Wimborne Minster

The impressive minster of this quiet market town makes it seem like a miniature cathedral city. The town is exceptionally quiet on Sunday. ...

Chagford

Once a tin-weighing station, Chagford was an area of fierce fighting between the Roundheads and the Cavaliers during the English Civil War....

Ripon

Said to be England’s second-oldest city and still one of its smallest, Ripon has been the site of a market since the 10th century, and probably...

Aylesbury

Aylesbury makes a good base for exploring the surrounding countryside, including stately homes and gardens. It's a pretty, historic place with...

St. Mawes

At the tip of the Roseland Peninsula is the quiet, unspoiled village of St. Mawes, where subtropical plants thrive. The peninsula itself is...

Southwold

This seaside town is an idyllic place to spend a day. The old-fashioned beach huts that huddle together against the wind on the shingle beach...

Battle

Battle is the actual site of the crucial Battle of Hastings, at which, on October 14, 1066, William of Normandy and his army trounced King Harold...

Helmsley

The market town of Helmsley, with its flowering window boxes, stone cottages, churchyard, and arched bridges leading across streams, is the...

Ely

Known for its magnificent cathedral, Ely is the "capital" of the fens, the center of what used to be a separate county called the Isle of Ely...

Robin Hood's Bay

With red-roof cottages and cobbled roads squeezed into a narrow ravine, this tiny fishing village is considered by many to be the prettiest...

Ironbridge Gorge

The River Severn and its tree-cloaked banks make an attractive backdrop to this cluster of villages; within a mile of the graceful span of the...

Okehampton

This town at the confluence of the rivers East and West Okement is a good base for exploring north Dartmoor. It has a fascinating museum dedicated...

Cartmel

The village of Cartmel is the southern Lakeland area's most attractive, set in a gentler Cumbrian landscape of hills and fields beyond the trees...

Sherborne

Originally the capital of Wessex (the actual Saxon kingdom, not Hardy’s retro conceit), this unspoiled market town is populated with medieval...

Borrowdale

South of Keswick and its lake lies the valley of Borrowdale, whose varied landscape of green valley floor and surrounding crags has long been...

Burford

Burford's broad main street leads steeply down to a narrow bridge across the River Windrush. The village served as a stagecoach stop for centuries...

Woodstock and Blenheim Palace

Handsome 17th- and 18th-century houses line the trim streets of Woodstock, at the eastern edge of the Cotswolds. It's best known for nearby...

Ross-on-Wye

Perched high above the River Wye in the Malvern Hills, Ross-on-Wye seems oblivious to modern-day intrusions and remains at heart a small market...

Ledbury

Among the 16th-century black-and-white half-timber buildings in the center of Ledbury, take special note of the Feathers Hotel and the Talbot...

Lydford

The sequestered hamlet of Lydford packs a lot into a small area: there's the dramatic scenery of the gorge just outside the village, the remains...

Bishop Auckland

For 700 years, between the 12th and 19th century, the powerful prince-bishops of Durham had their country residence in Auckland Castle, in the...

Northleach

Just off the Fosse Way (and bypassed by the busy A40), little Northleach—population around 2,000—has remained one of the least spoiled of Cotswold...

Broadstairs

Like other Victorian seaside towns such as Margate and Ramsgate, Broadstairs was once the playground of vacationing Londoners, and grand 19th...

Faversham

In Roman times Faversham was a thriving seaport. Today the port is long gone, and all that’s left is a waterway at the edge of town known as...

Abbotsbury

Pretty Abbotsbury is at the western end of Chesil Beach and has a swannery. In other parts of the village, you can also visit a children's farm...

Weymouth

West Dorset's main coastal resort, Weymouth, is known for its sandy and pebble beaches and its royal connections. King George III began seawater...

Saltaire

This planned community, built by a philanthropic Victorian industrialist in the wool trade to house his workers, perfectly preserves the architecture...

Eton

Some observers may find it symbolic that almost opposite Windsor Castle—which embodies the continuity of the royal tradition—stands Eton, a...

Long Melford

It's easy to see how this village got its name, especially if you walk the full length of its 2-mile-long main street, which gradually broadens...

Edale

At Edale, an extremely popular hiking center, you're truly in the Peak District wilds. This sleepy, straggling village, in the shadow of Mam...

Painswick

An old Cotswold wool town of around 2,000 inhabitants, Painswick has become a chocolate-box picture of quaintness, attracting day-trippers and...

Truro

The county seat and Cornwall's only real city, Truro is a good option mostly for food and shopping and for cathedral and museum buffs. For an...

Ryde

The town of Ryde has long been one of the Isle of Wight's most popular summer resorts with several family attractions. After the construction...

Cowes

If you embark from Southampton, your ferry crosses the Solent channel and docks at Cowes, near Queen Victoria's Osborne House. Cowes is a magic...

Newquay

The biggest, most developed resort on the north Cornwall coast is a fairly large town established in 1439. It was once the center of the trade...

Elterwater and the Langdales

The delightful village of Elterwater, at the eastern end of the Great Langdale Valley on B5343, is a good stop for hikers. It's barely more...

Marlow

Just inside the Buckinghamshire border, Marlow and the surrounding area overflow with Thames-side prettiness. The unusual suspension bridge...

Cliveden

This grand stately home, designed by Charles Barry, the architect of the Houses of Parliament, and the setting of the notorious Profumo affair...

Bamburgh

Tiny Bamburgh has a splendid castle, and several beaches are a few minutes' walk away. ...

Ascot

The posh town of Ascot (pronounced as -cut) has for centuries been famous for horse racing and for style. Queen Anne chose to have a racecourse...

Bibury

The tiny town of Bibury, with a population of less than 1,000, sits idyllically beside the little River Coln on B4425; it was famed Arts and...

Berwick-upon-Tweed

Although Berwick-upon-Tweed now lies just inside the border of England, historians estimate that it’s changed hands between the Scots and the...

Land's End

The coastal road, B3306, ends at the western tip of Britain at what is, quite literally, Land's End. ...

Bridlington

A fishing port settled since Roman times and probably long before, Bridlington is less upmarket than some other Yorkshire seaside resorts, although...

Henley-in-Arden

A brief drive out of Stratford will take you under the Stratford-upon-Avon Canal aqueduct to pretty Henley-in-Arden, whose wide main street...

Bewdley

...

Dunster

Lying between the Somerset coast and the edge of Exmoor National Park, Dunster is a picture-book village with a broad main street. The eight...

Bodmin

Bodmin was the only Cornish town recorded in the 11th-century Domesday Book, William the Conqueror's census. During World War I, the Domesday...

Chawton

In Chawton you can visit the home of Jane Austen (1775–1817), who lived the last eight years of her life in the village, moving to Winchester...

Deal

The large seaside town of Deal, known for its castle, is famous in history books as the place where Caesar's legions landed in 55 BC, and it...

Tintagel

The romance of Arthurian legend thrives around Tintagel's ruined castle on the coast. Ever since the somewhat unreliable 12th-century chronicler...

Brading

The Anglo-Norman St. Mary's Church in Brading dates back to 1180. It contains the tombs of the Oglanders, a local family whose Norman ancestor...

Much Wenlock

Much Wenlock, a town on the A458, is full of half-timber buildings, including a 16th-century guildhall. Nearby are popular places to walk. The...

Ventnor

The south-coast resorts are the sunniest and most sheltered on the Isle of Wight. Handsome Ventnor rises from such a steep slope that the ground...

Penshurst Place

One of the best preserved of the great medieval houses in Britain, and surrounded by stunning landscaped gardens, Penshurst Place is like an...

Althorp

Althorp, known as the childhood home and burial place of Princess Diana, has fine architecture and paintings, both Old Masters and new. ...

Bassenthwaite Lake

Bassenthwaite is the only body of water officially called a lake in the Lake District; the others are known as "meres" or "waters." Bird-watchers...

Boscastle

In tranquil Boscastle, some of the stone-and-slate cottages at the foot of the steep valley date from the 1300s. A good place to relax and walk...

Rydal

The village of Rydal, on the small glacial lake called Rydal Water, is rich with Wordsworthian associations. ...

Mousehole

Between Land's End and Penzance, Mousehole (pronounced mow -zel, the first syllable rhyming with "cow") merits a stop—and plenty of people...

Launceston

Cornwall's ancient capital, Launceston, on the eastern side of Bodmin Moor, retains parts of its medieval walls, including the South Gate. ...

Clovelly

Lovely Clovelly always seems to have the sun shining on its flower-lined cottages and stepped and cobbled streets. Alas, its beauty is well...

Beaulieu

The unspoiled village of Beaulieu (pronounced byoo -lee) has three major attractions in one at Beaulieu Abbey and is near the museum village...

Stourhead

England has many memorable gardens, but Stourhead is one of the most glorious. Its centerpiece is a magnificent artificial lake surrounded by...

Alum Bay and the Needles

At the western tip of the Isle of Wight is the island's most famous natural landmark, the Needles, a long line of jagged chalk stacks jutting...

Lower Slaughter and Upper Slaughter

To see the quieter, more typical Cotswold villages, seek out the evocatively named Lower Slaughter and Upper Slaughter (the names have nothing...

Cerne Abbas

The village of Cerne Abbas, worth a short exploration on foot, has some Tudor houses on the road beside the church. Nearby you can also see...

Stamford

Serene, honey-hued Stamford, on a hillside overlooking the River Welland, has a well-preserved center, in part because in 1967 it was designated...

Danby

The old stone village of Danby nestles in the green Esk Valley, a short walk from the summit of the moors. It's been settled since Viking times...

Topsham

This small town, full of narrow streets and hidden courtyards, was once a bustling river port, and it remains rich in 18th-century houses and inns. ...

Sudbury

An early silk-weaving industry (still in existence, on a smaller scale) as well as the wool trade brought prosperity to Sudbury, which has three...

Hawes

The best time to visit the so-called cheesiest town in Yorkshire is on Tuesday, when farmers crowd into town for the weekly market. Crumbly...

Lacock

Owned by the National Trust, this lovely Wiltshire village is the victim of its own charm, its unspoiled gabled and stone-tile cottages drawing...

Trelissick

Trelissick is known for the colorful Trelissick Garden, owned by the National Trust. ...

Orford

Part of the Suffolk Heritage Coast, a 40-mile stretch that runs from Felixstowe northward to Kessingland, ancient Orford is a beautiful example...

Washington

The little town of Washington has a direct link to the history of the United States. ...

Ightham Mote

Almost unique among medieval manor houses in that it still has a moat (although that has nothing to do with the name), Ightham is a captivating...

Chartwell

Beloved of Winston Churchill, Chartwell retains a homely warmth despite its size and grandeur. Almost as lovely are the grounds, with a rose...

Port Isaac

A mixture of granite, slate, and whitewashed cottages tumbles precipitously down the cliff to the tiny harbor at Port Isaac, still dedicated...

East Grinstead

The small country town of East Grinstead claims the longest continuous run of 14th-century timber-frame buildings in the country. Six miles...

Coventry

...

Rothbury

The small market town of Rothbury, surrounded by stunning countryside, was originally developed as a Victorian resort, attracting the gentry...

Burwash

Burwash, a pretty Sussex village, is known for its association with writer Rudyard Kipling. The setting for Kipling's Puck of Pook's Hill ...

Lizard Peninsula

The southernmost point on mainland Britain, this peninsula is a government-designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, named so for the rocky...

Knole

Perhaps the quintessential Tudor mansion, Knole is as famous for its literary connections and impressive collection of furniture and tapestries...

Knaresborough

At the bottom of a precipitously deep, rocky gorge along the River Nidd, the little town of Knaresborough could hardly be more photogenic. It...

Thirsk

This busy market town on the western edge of the moors was once an important coaching stop on the main east–west route from the dales to the...

Dorchester-on-Thames

An important center in Saxon times, when it was the seat of a bishopric, Dorchester merits a visit chiefly because of its ancient abbey, but...

Beer

Beer, just outside Seaton, was once a favorite smugglers' haunt, and the fishing village has remained fairly unchanged. It was the source of...

Runnymede

...

Hutton-le-Hole

Sleepy Hutton-le-Hole is a charming little place based around a wide village green, with woolly sheep snoozing in the shade of stone cottages...

Farne Islands

Owned by the National Trust, these bleak, wind-tossed islands are home to several seabirds, including puffins and guillemots. ...

Peterborough

...

Honiton

...

Helston

...

Sonning-on-Thames

It’s plausible that Sonning's reputation as the prettiest village on the Thames goes back as far as its Saxon bishops. The 18th-century bridge...

Askrigg

...

Owlpen

...

Great Bookham

Fine old buildings fill Great Bookham, including a well-preserved 12th-century church. ...

Perranporth

Past the sandy shores of Perran Bay, Perranporth is one of Cornwall's most popular seaside spots and becomes extremely busy in high season,...

Blandford Forum

Boasting what is perhaps the handsomest Georgian town center in the South of England, this market town of brick and stone on the River Stour...

Romsey

...

Sandwich

The coast near Canterbury holds three of the ancient Cinque Ports , a confederacy of ports along the southeast seaboard whose heyday lasted...

Yeovilton

...

The West Country

England's West Country is a land of granite promontories, windswept moors, hideaway hamlets, and—above all—the sea. Leafy, narrow country roads...

The Southeast

Surrey, Kent, and Sussex form the breadbasket of England, where bucolic farmland stretches as far as the eye can see. Once a favorite destination...

Manchester, Liverpool, and the Peak District

For those looking for picture-postcard England, the northwest region of the country might not appear at the top of many sightseeing lists, but...

East Anglia

One of those beautiful English inconsistencies, East Anglia has no spectacular mountains or rivers to disturb the quiet, storied land of rural...

Stratford-upon-Avon and the Heart of England

The lyricism of England's geographical heartland is found in the remote, half-timber market towns of Herefordshire, Worcestershire, and Shropshire...

Bath and the Cotswolds

The rolling uplands of the Cotswolds represent all the beauty and charm rural England has to offer, as immortalized in countless books, paintings...

The South

Cathedrals, stately homes, stone circles—the South, made up of Hampshire, Dorset, and Wiltshire counties—contains a variety of notable attractions...

Yorkshire

A hauntingly beautiful region, Yorkshire is known for its wide-open spaces and dramatic landscapes. The hills of the North York Moors and the...

The Lake District

Let nature be your teacher." Wordsworth's ideal comes true in this popular national park of jagged mountains, waterfalls, wooded valleys, and...

The Thames Valley

Easy proximity to London has made the Thames Valley a favored hangout for the wealthy, just as it has been for centuries. The rich and powerful...

The Northeast

For many Britons, the words "the Northeast" provoke a vision of near-Siberian isolation. But although there are wind-hammered, wide-open spaces...

All Destinations
Expand All Collapse All