Which cities, which NY neighbourhoods?

Old Mar 12th, 2006, 08:27 AM
  #21  
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How about attending a Labor Day parade--especially interesting during an election year.
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Old Mar 12th, 2006, 11:04 AM
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The other thing I don;t think anyone has mentioned is that you seem to be concentrating on the Presidential election. Often some of the senatorial and gubernatorial elections are almost as important - and even more exciting. (A president with a completely uncooperative senate can hardly be effective.)

And it's kind of hard this far out to know which will be the most important ones - again - back to that swing state issue. And the issues are often very diferent from those "official" issues of the national election.

(There are states where the presidential candidate is vital to the election of the local people - and other states where the local candidates do everything to distance themselves from the national candidate - due to particular regional/local issues.)

I will agree that although NYC is the center of news media - both broadcast and print - it's not the most exciting place - since most races are foregone conclusions. (Here it's the democratic primaries that will bring out the big bucks and nasty slogans.)
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Old Mar 12th, 2006, 12:20 PM
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wliwl,

I wasn't recommending Las Vegas and Phoenix for any other reason than to fulfill tassietiger's request to focus on the political side of America in 2008. I didn't say I liked them. But they are politically more representative of the forces shaping America than Boston.
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Old Mar 13th, 2006, 03:48 AM
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This whole exercise has been very informative. Can I say two things?

First, in 2008 I shall be an Australian political scientist at the end of my working road. In answer to the question from 'Anonymous', I just want to be in the USA to follow an American Presidential election 'on-site' - through newspapers and TV. It will be so much better than trying to follow it at home. However, I do like 'Nessundorma's' suggestion of contacting a news organisation and will follow up this idea.

Second our holidays are typically self-catering stays in cities where we potter about for about 1-2 weeks. It is not to everyone's taste, for we undoubtedly miss a lot, but it suits us - we can sit for an afternoon in Venice in a square drinking Italian beer, make three visits to Musee d'Orsay in a fortnight's stay in Paris, spend a full day at Castle Howard or most of a day a the Bempton Cliffs bird sanctuary. We don't race around!

So back to US cities. We have New York and San Francisco pencilled in. Which five other cities should we see if this turns out to be our only visit to the USA?

'Dreamer2' referred to the state of Vermont. If one of the cities turns out to be Boston, would we be close enough to do some leaf-peeping in Vermont?
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Old Mar 13th, 2006, 04:41 AM
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Hi tassietiger,

Near the end of April of this year, I am going to a family gathering which has no less then 4 executives of U.S. national media, 2 of them TV for major networks. Would you like to exchange e-mails and I can sound them out about possible interest in you as a media star?

Back to your question: Which US cities besides NY and SF?

For pure enjoyment, Chicago (best architecture) Southern California (it's all one big city from Santa Barbara to San Diego and it's got the best weather), Seattle (best food), Maine (OK, it's not a city but it's got the best scenery on the east coast) and Las Vegas (it's the most despicable).

And we assume you are going to Washington just to get the real aroma.
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Old Mar 14th, 2006, 02:43 AM
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ttt
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Old Mar 14th, 2006, 02:55 AM
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Forgetting about the election, from a vacation point of view, if I were picking 5 cities I would be happy to spend 1 week in (perhaps including day trips ), trying to spread them across the country, I'd pick

Washington DC
Savannah or Charleston
Chicago
Portland
San Diego

I'd visit Boston from NYC and LA from San Diego.
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Old Mar 14th, 2006, 03:24 AM
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That's a pretty reasonable list of cities. Except that visiting Boston "from NYC" isn't very practical, since it's a 4-hour trip each way.
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Old Mar 14th, 2006, 05:49 AM
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What, no mention of New Orleans? Besides the fact that it is a singular U.S. city due to the confluence of French, American & Afro-Caribbean culture, the issue of levees should be a key issue in the upcoming presidential election.
And BTW, the food & music are great!
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Old Mar 14th, 2006, 06:33 AM
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Don't know if you have your answer regarding NYC neighborhoods or not, but I would vote for the Upper West Side. Manhattan is so easy to get around that it's not worth staying in two neighborhoods. Why trouble yourself? The Upper West is very neighborhoody,has lots of restaurants and excellent grocery shopping, not to mention being close to Central Park and Riverside Drive. I would not recommend Midtown at all. It's mostly offices and downtown while great doesn't have the parks and can be more touristy.
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Old Mar 14th, 2006, 07:21 AM
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Do you always start planning your trips two years in advance? Well okay - here's my two cents:

There is no need to live in two different neighborhoods in Manhattan - the city's efficient public transit system is part of its charm. Avoid midtown (mostly business, theaters, and tourist traps) and Uptown (less safe and no major nearby sights). The "upper sides" are high-end but generally less character-full than the downtown neighborhoods.

San Francisco is also a wonderful city to visit though I recommend renting a car for part of your stay to visit the wine country and the coastlines to the North and the South of the bay area. You probably will not want a car for the city itself because parking can be extremely difficult. If you have no problems navigating steep hills I recommend the Cow Hollow area for great local restaurants, good weather, and views of Alcatraz and the bay. The Fisherman's Wharf and Union Square areas (not to be confused with Union Street in Cow Hollow) are over-touristed so visit but don't live there.

As for the rest of your vacation, I would focus on the "swing states" where advertising and candidate visits will be most visible. From Manhattan, Philadelphia is only a short train ride away and is full of great historical landmarks (as well as lots of grime and crime issues at the outskirts - be careful). It is a very Democratic city but because of the conservative western half the state of Pennsylvania will likely be an important swing state. From Philadelphia you should take another train ride further south to Washington DC. You could also take time to enjoy the small towns and amazing fall colors of New Hampshire during early October. New Hampshire's primary will be long past but it has been a swing state for the last several elections. Looking beyond the North-East, Miami is a very characterful city in a state which will get a lot of attention. Other swing states are in the northwest (I slightly prefer Portland over Seattle but like both) and the southwest (Las Vegas is a given but I also like the small towns of Taos New Mexico and Durango Colorado). That adds up to more than 5 choices but you still have two more years to narrow down the list. Save the warmest cities for the end of your trip. Good luck and have fun!
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Old Mar 14th, 2006, 10:32 AM
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I would definitely add Santa Fe or Tucson, and maybe San Antonio. Charleston or Savannah for sure. Seattle or Portland. So that makes three/four. Maybe New Orleans. and/or Miami. Maybe Vegas if you will not be too grossed out by all the tack. These are a few of the cities which, in my opinion, have the most character and unique flavor. Very different than
Tasmania, I would think!
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Old Mar 14th, 2006, 11:40 AM
  #33  
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I second exactly what mclaurie proposes-but possibly adding a St. Louis or Kansas City and at least one driving road trip within 300 miles of the Mississippi.

If you are serious about the political science aspect, you need to realize that news coverage across the USA is not equitable in several aspects, nor do many rurals listen to national news networks. I live in two states, IL & MI, and the "news" between these two is 180 degrees different upon the same event- just in the tone of approach from city to rural, before the "facts" are even broached.

Most of your planned vacation, IMHO, is a great vacation and experience but in relation to political happening is like watching the Civil War from Vermont and thinking you're living it.

This political polarization is strong and centered not only upon self-identity (USA) issues. The Democrats will not win unless they chose a candidate who has a great appeal and connection to the working class (under $30,000 household income)belief system- which includes some quite religion based ethics as an ideal. This is just my opinion, but I have been right about the last 4 Presidential elections.

You would need to be in smaller markets to get another and less altered view if you are doing serious political science considerations.
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Old Mar 14th, 2006, 12:05 PM
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I agree with staying in the Upper West Side or in the Village when in NYC.

While you're visiting Zion, be sure to also visit Bryce. I strongly suggesting spending another week there to see more of the "west" -- maybe fly in to Denver first, then drive around the "Four Corners" area (New Mexico, Arizona... come on, the Grand Canyon is still not to be missed!...) then up into Utah for the national parks. I've done this and it was spectacular; definitely a big part of experiencing the USA.

Also I suggest visiting the following cities: Boston (for the historical feel, strong New England culture, drive up to see some leaves), Los Angeles (very different from San Francisco, great everything!), and Washington DC.
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Old Mar 16th, 2006, 02:29 AM
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Just a quick thank-you to all who answered my questions - we have lots to think about and assess. I suspect that closer to the time I'll be asking more!
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