Oregon Coast

Old Aug 6th, 2020, 04:02 AM
  #1  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 174
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Oregon Coast

We have 2 full days to drive the Oregon coast early September. Please suggest a few stops/areas that we shouldn't miss. We are in our 60s and no children with us. Thanks in advance
hbo6 is offline  
Old Aug 6th, 2020, 06:14 AM
  #2  
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 11,134
Likes: 0
Received 17 Likes on 4 Posts
How are you arriving in Oregon (car, plane, train or other?) I prefer driving on US 101 north to south. That makes all your turns into viewpoints right turns with right turns coming back out from views.
What are your plans after the two days (north south or east)? Possible overnight stops include Lincoln City, Newport, Coos Bay and Brookings. My favorite stops along 101 are the Tillamook cheese factory (great ice cream and cheese), the Bell Buoy in Seaside for good clam chowder and the Oregon Coast Aquarium south of the big bridge in Newport. There are a couple of great golf courses along the coast if that interests you.
tomfuller is offline  
Old Aug 6th, 2020, 07:07 AM
  #3  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 174
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
We will be leaving Olympic NP heading to Redwoods, so driving from north to south.
hbo6 is offline  
Old Aug 6th, 2020, 07:54 AM
  #4  
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 11,134
Likes: 0
Received 17 Likes on 4 Posts
Originally Posted by hbo6 View Post
We will be leaving Olympic NP heading to Redwoods, so driving from north to south.
Good. Stop to see the Astoria Column after you come over the big bridge across the mouth of the Columbia River. Also take a detour about 5 miles east on OR Rt 38 from Reedsport to see some Roosevelt Elk at the Dean's Creek Viewing area.
After you enter California stop at the "Trees of Mystery". They have many interesting Coast Redwoods and a chairlift to a platform high on the hill.
tomfuller is offline  
Old Aug 7th, 2020, 12:01 PM
  #5  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 95,013
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Do you have reservations for places to stay? I know my parents (who live in Oregon but about an hour inland) cancelled a usual September trip because their favorites were not available (because of covid).
suze is offline  
Old Aug 7th, 2020, 12:36 PM
  #6  
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 67,855
Likes: 0
Received 50 Likes on 7 Posts
the whole length of the coast will be a pretty fast jaunt with just two days. Since you say 2 'full' days, I assume you have three nights - right?

And ONP is a huge place - where will you be starting from? Olympia or Ocean City is a WHOLE different thing than if you will be in, say . . . Forks.
janisj is online now  
Old Aug 8th, 2020, 10:21 AM
  #7  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 34,144
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I would presume two full days to drive that route means start in the OP and end near Redwood State Park at the end of the second day and thus would only include one overnight, not 3, along the route. It's a lot of driving, about 6 hrs each day, so not a lot of time to do any other sightseeing. but if the idea is what is a can't miss sight, I guess people like those rocks off the coat of Cannon Beach, and you can just see them driving along there, you can stop in that park along the coast to stretch your legs and take in the view if you want. It is a nice sight. Newport is about half way on that route.

What I really enjoyed a lot on that route is the Columbia River Maritime Museum in Astoria, which was fantastic. that alone would take a couple hours, though. The Lewis and Clark National Historical Park just a bit farther along rt 101 is also interesting if you are interested in the history of the exploration of that area and Lewis and Clark. There's a fort replica there. It's interesting and a slight trek around there, but I'd regard the Astoria Museum as better.

https://www.nps.gov/lewi/index.htm
Christina is online now  
Old Aug 8th, 2020, 11:26 AM
  #8  
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 67,855
Likes: 0
Received 50 Likes on 7 Posts
" . . . at the end of the second day and thus would only include one overnight, not 3, along the route."

That is why I asked for clarification. One night doesn't equal 2 full days, Two nights could mean two full days, and three nights definitely nets two full days.

" . . . about 6 hrs each day"

Entirely dependent on WHERE they are starting from in ONP
janisj is online now  
Old Aug 10th, 2020, 09:42 AM
  #9  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 174
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Sorry for delay. We will be leaving Lake Quinault Lodge in Olympic NP and actually have three full days with the night of the third day at our airbnb in Klamath, CA.
Have decided to stop at Cannon Beach, Heceta Lighthouse, Tillamook Creamery, Sam H. Boardman Scenic Corridor. What coastal town would you recommend to visit?
hbo6 is offline  
Old Aug 10th, 2020, 11:30 AM
  #10  
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 67,855
Likes: 0
Received 50 Likes on 7 Posts
IME that is a lot in 3 days but certainly doable - it will be a minimum 11 or 12 hours car time plus all the stops, which would be many (longer if there is construction). How late can you arrive at your airbnb? Probaby the two towns at the top of my list would be Yachats and Cannon Beach
janisj is online now  
Old Aug 10th, 2020, 03:22 PM
  #11  
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 9,806
Received 2 Likes on 1 Post
We were in Depoe Bay last November for a week. We did a day trip to McMinnville to visit the aeronautic museum featuring the Spruce Goose. This can be an all day visit as there is a lot of interesting exhibits set up in two huge buildings.

We also went up to visit the Tillamook Cheese Factory. This can be done pretty quickly, 1 hour, less than 2. This could be a good place to have lunch as they have a food court. Also nearby Tillamook is an aviation museum set up in a WW2 dirigible barn. The most interesting thing here is the massive building. This can also be about an hour stop.

On our way up to Depoe Bay, we stopped at the Heceta Lighthouse. It was very interesting and docents were on hand to give information and history. We spent quite a bit of time here. Have fun and enjoy!




Heceta Lighthouse First Order Fresnel Lens

Last edited by MichelleY; Aug 10th, 2020 at 03:24 PM.
MichelleY is online now  
Old Aug 16th, 2020, 04:57 PM
  #12  
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 273
Received 4 Likes on 1 Post
hbo6, it sounds like you're off to a good start. FWIW, I'll summarize what our family did four years ago while driving about two-thirds of the Oregon coast (232 out of 338 miles). We covered it from Bandon in the south to just above the town of Cannon Beach in the north, so a bit below Astoria. Taking it from north to south, as you will be going, these were our high points:

Ecola State Park: good views south to Cannon Beach and Haystack Rock.

The Tillamook Cheese Factory Tour.

The Devil's Punchbowl Scenic Area, including Otter Rock Beach. It's a great, broad, sweeping curve of sand, with shallow water for a good ways out and is remarkably uncrowded. There's an excellent view from a headland just to the north.


Otter Rock Beach

Otter Crest State Park. I think we saw puffins there.

Newport was where we did our overnight stay. It has the Oregon Aquarium, which we very much enjoyed going through. We stayed at a Holiday Inn Express on the south side of Yaquina Bay across from the main part of the town, but we were able to walk to the Aquarium from our hotel. Mo's Restaurant is an informal place in the main part of the port has been there for decades and is renowned for its seafood at a reasonable cost.

The bridge over Yaquina Bay at Newport was designed by Conde McCullough, who was the state bridge designer for the Oregon Highway Department from 1919-1935. He is known for several elegant bridges (including this one) along Highway 101 that are a reminder that there was a time when we did public works really well and cared about their aesthetic value. There's a good view of it from below and down the hill a bit on the left (east) side if you're driving south. It's worth getting off the road to see it. McCullough has a pretty decent entry in Wikipedia, as I recall.

Cape Perpetua. This is a high headland (800 feet) from which (according to a marker at the top) the view extends as much as 150 miles along the coast and 400 miles out to sea when the weather conditions are right. It was visited and named by Captain James Cook on Saint Perpetua's Day (March 7, 1778) as he explored up the Pacific coast on his way to Alaska.


View from Cape Perpetua

Oregon Dunes National Recreational Area. It's between Coos Bay and Florence, and its only a short hike from the parking area to the edge of the dunes, but what an expanse once you're there! We knew relatively little about it before we got there, but we and our kids (my teenage son, in particular) all enjoyed exploring it (and, in his case, running and sliding in the sand).

Shore Acres State Park (sea lions).

Cape Arago State Park (some pretty dramatic rock formations). I think there was an elegant residence now bequeathed to the state with some nice gardens near there.

Bandon. Once an overnight steamship stop on the San Francisco to Seattle run. It's in an area where there are lots of cranberry bogs, so it's known for its cranberry confections (notably cranberry fudge).

There is a really nice stretch of coast with both beaches and massive basalt rock formations (and a scenic drive along the coast) south of Bandon. Among these formations are Cathedral Rock and Face Rock.


Cathedral Rock, south of Bandon

In terms of driving and sightseeing time, I think we reached Bandon around noon or so from points further inland on our first day and finished in Cannon Beach at about 5 p.m. or 6 p.m. on our second day.

We found the Moon Guide to Oregon (authored by Judy Jewell and W.C. McRae) to be excellent, as I have found all of their guides to be.



jeffergray is offline  
Old Aug 16th, 2020, 05:38 PM
  #13  
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 273
Received 4 Likes on 1 Post
Oops! There's a typo in my account of the view from Cape Perpetua. That should be "40 miles out to sea," not 400.
jeffergray is offline  
Old Aug 21st, 2020, 05:56 AM
  #14  
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 11,134
Likes: 0
Received 17 Likes on 4 Posts
If you want to stay near the Oregon Dunes, you can stay at William Tugman State park campground. The campground has a few yurts. Another Oregon State Park that has yurts is Sunset Bay SW of Coos Bay.
tomfuller is offline  
Old Aug 24th, 2020, 05:57 AM
  #15  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 174
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Thanks to all who have responded to my question. I have noted all and appreciate everyone's help! Looking forward to seeing this part of our beautiful country.
hbo6 is offline  
Old Aug 26th, 2020, 09:57 AM
  #16  
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 1,436
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Keep an eye on the weather. If it is hot inland from the coast along I-5 (over 90 degrees) it will likely be foggy on the coast, which may work out for visual drama or may not if there are no views. The Oregon coast is arguably prettier than the central California coast but the weather (lack of fog) is not as reliable in the summer/early fall.
tom_mn is offline  
Old Sep 1st, 2020, 05:37 PM
  #17  
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 3,888
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by tomfuller View Post
If you want to stay near the Oregon Dunes, you can stay at William Tugman State park campground. The campground has a few yurts. Another Oregon State Park that has yurts is Sunset Bay SW of Coos Bay.
Tom, there are no yurts or cabins open in Oregon state parks until at least 2021. They haven't been open since March. We got our cancellation months ago. Tent sites are open.

https://stateparks.oregon.gov/index....t%20the%20link.
5alive is offline  
Old Sep 1st, 2020, 06:25 PM
  #18  
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 9,806
Received 2 Likes on 1 Post
Originally Posted by 5alive View Post
Tom, there are no yurts or cabins open in Oregon state parks until at least 2021. They haven't been open since March. We got our cancellation months ago. Tent sites are open.

https://stateparks.oregon.gov/index....t%20the%20link.
5alive - Did you get my private messages regarding Lake Tahoe?
MichelleY is online now  
Old Sep 2nd, 2020, 07:50 PM
  #19  
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 11,134
Likes: 0
Received 17 Likes on 4 Posts
Originally Posted by 5alive View Post
Tom, there are no yurts or cabins open in Oregon state parks until at least 2021. They haven't been open since March. We got our cancellation months ago. Tent sites are open.

https://stateparks.oregon.gov/index....t%20the%20link.
At least some of the Oregon State Parks started renting yurts starting June 9. If you are interested in getting a yurt call 1 800 452 5687 M-F 8 to 5. Out of state renters must pay 30% more than Oregon renters.
One advantage using a yurt is that you don't have to take down a wet tent if it rains during the night. The 3 Oregon State Parks that I have stayed in yurts are Sunset Beach, William Tugman and Champoeg.
tomfuller is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Original Poster
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Sta_Crz_Dad
Road Trips
6
Oct 6th, 2009 12:50 PM
hinson123
United States
7
Jul 27th, 2004 06:22 AM
julie
United States
7
Dec 4th, 1998 04:09 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Do Not Sell My Personal Information


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 10:51 AM.