Go Back  Fodor's Travel Talk Forums > Destinations > Europe
Reload this Page >

Questions about weather, dress code. and staying in or around Paris

Questions about weather, dress code. and staying in or around Paris

Oct 2nd, 2007, 11:00 AM
  #1  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 189
Questions about weather, dress code. and staying in or around Paris

Hi all: Help please;
I'll be in Paris and Reims from Oct. 23-29th. I thought I'd make hotel stays in a surrounding area, perhaps a quaint village or an interesting town nearby? I've never been there, so any info would be helpful. Also is a dress and heels the dress code in Paris for museums and touring? And (being from Florida and long time out of the cold,) would a swede coat or a light jacket be best for late October? I like all kinds of areas from cities to natural settings, I'm looking for an area that may not involve massive walking - even thought it might be best to stay right in Paris. All feed-back is appriciated.
virgi is offline  
Oct 2nd, 2007, 11:08 AM
  #2  
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 25
Dress comfortably, you will be doing a lot of walking. When my wife and I were there for our honeymoon, I noticed all types of dress, but never did I see a woman actually wearing a dress to a museum, and definately not heels. One practical idea might be those European style shoes you see everywhere nowadays that are part sneaker, part dress shoe that can be dressed up or down.

As far as the temps go, my advice is dress in layers that you can take off or put on, a suede coat might be too much.

My opinion on lodging is to stay in Paris, the quaint experience that you are searching for can be found right in the city itself at almost any cafe or picinic area. You will love it!
plastictraveller is offline  
Oct 2nd, 2007, 11:15 AM
  #3  
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 7,525
You could stay in a quaint village outside of Paris...but are you prepared to take the train everyday to go into Paris, which could be...say 30 minutes one way? And, if you are doing any shopping, you'd have to carry it all around with you, until get back to village.

It can be done, but if the focus of your trip is to see paris, I would think staying in Paris makes more sense. Depending on wher you stay, you coudl actually walk to some of the main sites from your hotel, and walk back at night. Perhaps if you gave a budget for hotels, we can help decide.

For first timers, I'd usually recommend the 4/5/6th arrondissements (districts). These are central, walking distance to "stuff", plenty of restaurants,etc..If you do want to be away from the tourist a bit more, the 7th/16th are ones that I can recommend.

Note that the train, metro and bus system in Paris is very good, so you will never be very far from public transit. The question will always be if you want to "be" there or "go" there.

You can do a day trip to Reims. I did it a couple of years ago. Train mid morning, return dinner time. Visited cathedral, walked around town, went for Champagne tasting.

Dress code...this topic comes up VERY regularly here, you can search on the topic. Basically, dress as you would at home, excluding baseball caps on backwards, jeans halfway down your legs,etc...
Michel_Paris is offline  
Oct 2nd, 2007, 11:18 AM
  #4  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 33,753
You do not have to wear a dress and heels for sightseeing and museums, any more than in the US. I definitely have seen women wearing dresses in museums, though, including myself. It's not unheard of, a lot of women actually prefer dresses in summer. And a lot of women prefer a shoe with some heel, but I suspect you are asking about dressy "heels", and that's different from a shoe with a one to two inch heel. Of course, that is personal taste as I am constantly amazed at the women who wear 4 inch stiletto heels and are, for example, in airports going on long trips.

You will need more than a light jacket in Paris in late October, probably. It's possible you won't, but I wouldn't want to bet on it. Assume you should have outer wear as if you were going to New York in late October. I wouldn't want to carry a suede coat when traveling, but a leather coat might be about right (but I might not take one). I'd want a sweater for daytime, and something maybe between a "light" jacket (which to me is almost nothing) and a suede coat--maybe a three-quarter length one.
Christina is offline  
Oct 2nd, 2007, 11:22 AM
  #5  
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,836
You may also want to consider the possibility of rain. I would recommend a raincoat (with optional zip-on liner) and a good pair of shoes that's comfortable and won't be ruined in rain. I'm a big fan of wraps, gloves and hats around late autumn.
W9London is offline  
Oct 2nd, 2007, 12:58 PM
  #6  
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 20,693
Women you see wearing dresses and heels in museums are most probably French--tourists are exempt.
Underhill is offline  
Oct 2nd, 2007, 01:31 PM
  #7  
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 21,864
Paris has no dress code. I will never repeat this enough. Paris is the city that invented "live and let live" and that aspect probably contributes to the fact that it is the most visited city in the world.

Believe me, when you see how all of the new Chinese tourists are dressed, you will never ever worry about wearing American clothes, shoes, baseball caps or any other kind of garment for the rest of your life.
kerouac is offline  
Oct 2nd, 2007, 01:45 PM
  #8  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 92,777
I would never think to take high heels on a trip. There is no dress code in Paris for museums and touring.

For less walking to more places I would stay in the lower numbered arrondisement (5th or 6th are nice).
suze is offline  
Oct 2nd, 2007, 03:47 PM
  #9  
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 57,890
If you want to see Paris you need to stay in it.

As for clothes - you will be walking miles- and what's vital is that shoes are comfortable and water resistant ( a week in europe in late Oct I would be amazed if you don;t get a couple of days of rain).

As for a coat, I would probably do a raincoat with liner (suede is to likely to be ruined by the rain) as well as a couple of sweaters and various tops to layer.

If you want to wear a dress that's fine - but I would do so only if that's how you go to a museum at home. I find pants (not jeans, which are too heavy and take forever to dry when they get wet) more practical for travel, except for 1 or 2 going out to dinner dresses.
nytraveler is offline  
Oct 3rd, 2007, 07:33 AM
  #10  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 189
Thank you all so very much for your info, now I know what to leave home, (being from Florida, I haven't been in cold country for many,many years) but now thanks to your help, I am more secure of what to pack. And Michel, Paris: I've been looking up different places to stay and , when you say 4/5/6, does that refer to the area around the Eiffel Tower,or close to the Sacre Coeur? (no info that I have refers to those kind of number-directions) I do want to stay close to the sights for 4-5 days, and then another 2 days near rue d'Orell. That seems like an interesting, quaint area to relax and get ready for my next 5 days. Any thoghts about this plan? My delimma is that I just came back from Washington D.C. and because I didn't pace myself well, my feet are still sore, especially the left leg,(5days now) so I 'm trying to avoid this for the 23days in Europe. Thank you again, your most kind.
virgi is offline  
Oct 3rd, 2007, 08:24 AM
  #11  
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 1,607
When someone says to stay in 4/5/6 -- that refers to the arrondisements of Paris. Have you looked at a map of Paris? It is divided into districts called arrondisements. Most people prefer to stay in the 4th, 5th, or 6th arrondissement, or at least recommend those as good places to stay for a first-timer in Paris.

The Eiffel Tower is in the 7th, which is a quieter residential neighborhood. A lot of people enjoy staying there, but it's too quiet (and dead at night) for others. It can feel a little far from the bustling activity that you see in the 5th/6th at night.
cheryllj is offline  
Oct 3rd, 2007, 09:02 AM
  #12  
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 21,864
<<Most people prefer to stay in the 4th, 5th, or 6th arrondissement>>

You need to qualify that as "most American people" since "most people" stay in the 9th and 10th arrondissements, the ones with the most hotels.
kerouac is offline  
Oct 3rd, 2007, 09:10 AM
  #13  
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 1,607
Actually what I meant was "most people on this forum." I was replying in the context of the question related to that specific recommendation posted above. I do see it a lot when people ask ON THIS FORUM about where to stay in Paris.

I've stayed in the 5th, 6th, 7th, and 16th, and I enjoyed all of them. Maybe next time I will try the 4th.
cheryllj is offline  
Oct 3rd, 2007, 09:11 AM
  #14  
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 21,864
... and that is why I will never be quoted in the Fodor's guide. I consistently go against the grain.
kerouac is offline  
Oct 3rd, 2007, 09:25 AM
  #15  
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 142
Kerouac, What is your impression of staying in the 1st arr.? I am staying equi-distant from the Louvre, Pont Neuf, and M Chatellet-Les Halles in May 2008.
ddena is offline  
Oct 3rd, 2007, 09:37 AM
  #16  
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 21,864
The 1st arrondissement is quite small, but a great location and very interesting. I would be much happier with it than the 6th, 7th or 8th, to name a few.
kerouac is offline  
Oct 3rd, 2007, 09:44 AM
  #17  
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 142
Merci. I thought so as well.
ddena is offline  
Oct 3rd, 2007, 09:48 AM
  #18  
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 7,525
I would think that staying somewhere central (with Notre Dame being mile 0) would be preferable for any tourists going to Paris....for me, a place on Ile St Louis is the place to be, based on budget of course. I walk out my door, I'm 5 mins from ND, 5 minutes from Left Bank and loads of restos, 5 mins from right bank, metro to Louvre area nearby, RER to airport nearby, Seine cruise not far....

I've stayed in the 16th twice..once in an appartment near M Michel-Ange and one near Maison de Radio-France, and really enjoyed the neighbourhood. No tourists, my own cafe every morning. My one minor inconvenience was that I had to Metro every day to go to where I wanted to be....the "doing stuff" areas where somewhere else, the "doing nothing stuff" was nice in the 16th.

If it was my first trip to Paris, I'd think the lower arr. #s would be preferable, just for ease of being near things. I'm not familiar enough with 9/10th (apart from some wanderings in the area) to recommend any hotels...but would be interested to know of some..and interesting sites to see for enxt trip.
Michel_Paris is offline  
Oct 3rd, 2007, 10:14 AM
  #19  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 189
Thank you all for your reply. My map has streets and route #'s like A1,N410,E15,etc; I'm thinking it's the roads and Michel-Paris is the Notre Dame near R La Fayette, or Saint-Ouen, I mean where is the lower ar's? And what do you think of the area by the Museum de art Noif for the peaceful-quaint area? I direct to you because you seem so familar to Par-ee, Thanks
virgi is offline  
Oct 3rd, 2007, 10:31 AM
  #20  
tod
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 3,654
ddena - Could you elaborate? Say, give us a hotel name( or other)? Just interested for the future.
tod is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy -

FODOR'S VIDEO

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 06:30 AM.