Links golf

May 31st, 2002, 06:47 PM
  #1  
Jinx Hoover
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Links golf

Any golfers out there? Let's talk about links golf in the U.K. Where have you played and which courses are favorites? Jinx Hoover
 
Jun 1st, 2002, 12:13 AM
  #2  
Sheila
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Links courses I have played- geographically

The Old Course, Monifieth, Carnoustie, Royal Aberdeen, Murcar, Cruden Bay, Nairn Dunbar, Nairn Championship.Oh, and Stomness.

Cruden Bay is my favourite of those. And not one of them is easy.
 
Jun 1st, 2002, 05:46 AM
  #3  
Jinx Hoover
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Sheila, you have played some good ones. Links golf is tough golf! Often windy, cold, and rainy, the Scots just don their woolens and play on. Many Americans don't like the links because they are barren compared to our manicured courses. I like the challenge and variety they offer. Cruden Bay certainly is a delight. May I also recommend Royal Dornoch and Machrihanish as well as the obvious ones in the south. Hit 'em straight! Jinx Hoover
 
Jun 1st, 2002, 08:07 AM
  #4  
janis
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I am a true duffer and seldom play in Scotland. But I have taken (or arranged) friends on golfing trips several times and have been to all of the ones listed so far except N Aberdeen and Stromness.

Plus many of the Ayrshire courses (Troon, Prestwick, Turnbury, etc.) and a lot of the Fife links.

The consensus of most of my mad golfing friends is Royal Dornoch is the BEST, Carnoustie is the hardest, the Old Course is the most memorable experience and Machrihanish is a top five.
 
Jun 1st, 2002, 08:12 AM
  #5  
Not Tiger
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Hi, I'm a beginner golfer, could someone explain what "Links" golf is and how it differs (if it does) from regular golf? thanks!
 
Jun 1st, 2002, 08:34 AM
  #6  
Sheila
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The golf doesn't differ at all, just the course.

They are seaside courses where the ground is mostly sand (and thus the bunkers are naturally part of the dunes), the grass is mostly very short and originally thee would have been little course maintenance.

They are challenging because of the wind, amongst other things. Most of the Scottish courses you know the names of, and some of the English, are links courses
 
Jun 1st, 2002, 09:01 AM
  #7  
golf
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>They are challenging because of the >wind, amongst other things. Most of >the Scottish courses you know the >names of, and some of the English, are >links courses

They are also the oldest and are proper courses not pat-ball courses set up to flatter golfers with a good score.
 
Jun 1st, 2002, 09:38 AM
  #8  
Sheila
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I went looking for this for you.

What is the definition of Scottish Golf Links? For the answer to this question we go to the archives and consult the authority on golf history, Sir Walter Simpson. From him we learn the true meaning of golf links.

"The grounds on which golf is played are called links, being the barren sandy soil from which the sea has retired in recent geological times. In their natural state links are covered with long, rank bent grass and gorse. Links are too barren for cultivation: but sheep, rabbits, geese and professionals pick up a precarious livelihood on them
 
Jun 1st, 2002, 11:03 AM
  #9  
John
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I've played on several of the links courses in East Lothian (but not Muirfield) as well as Dornoch and absolutely love it. Playing on a windy spring day can be a humbling experience, but there are certain benefits, not least being the plentiful availability of climatalogical, botanical, and geological, excuses for your shots. One note not yet covered: on most links courses the rough is as good as out of bounds. Aim, not loft, is the name of the game.

I was by the green when a player sank an ace at Muirfield during a Ryder Cup match many year ago (I think it was the first time). Unbelievable geometry, given the conditions. Wow.
 
Jun 1st, 2002, 07:46 PM
  #10  
Jinx Hoover
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Many thanks for your replies, everyone. Links golf is very dear to me, and as John said, "It can be a very humbling experience when the elements are really acting up"! I have played all the British Open links. Even Royal Portrush in Northern Ireland. And someone else properly said, "They are not manicured cutesy courses, to be conquered easily". The great thing is that the Scots (and other linksmen) adjust their expectations according to the conditions. A 420 yard 4 par into a 40mph wind might make one proud of a 5 or 6. The main thing is to play on! Thanks again. Jinx Hoover
 

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