Ireland in Winter

Oct 26th, 2005, 12:49 PM
  #1  
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Ireland in Winter

My fiance and I are going to Ireland in February. As the weather can be erratic at this time of year, are there any places that you would not recommend going to?


rockslide is offline  
Oct 26th, 2005, 02:00 PM
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No not really. When it rains have an umbrella and when the sun shines have a smile.
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Oct 27th, 2005, 05:14 AM
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Very nice way of looking at it. That's exactly the kind of answer that I was looking for.
rockslide is offline  
Oct 27th, 2005, 06:25 AM
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Rockslide, I've been to Ireland three times now, in September, December and February. Each time, I was pleasantly surprised by the weather. Granted, I've always encountered at least a few days of rain, but it was otherwise fairly nice. I live in the Midwest and hate the cold, but Ireland is generally more temperate than that, without the extremes we experience in the States. The air always feels slightly damp, which I find to be refreshing. The key is to bring clothes that you can layer, some rain gear, and an umbrella of course (although I was surprised at how few people, at least in Dublin, use one).

Have a great time!

Kate
Indygirl2 is offline  
Oct 27th, 2005, 12:06 PM
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Indygirl2, I'm glad to hear that someone else likes to travel to cold places, like Ireland in winter. Everyone thinks we're crazy to go somewhere cold instead of somewhere tropical for our honeymoon. I think it will be even more romantic if it's cold, with the mist, fog, etc. Plus, there won't be as many tourists, or so I've heard, so it'll be a lot quieter.
rockslide is offline  
Oct 27th, 2005, 12:37 PM
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I honeymooned in Ireland in December and enjoyed it -- cool and damp, but nothing that kept us indoors when we didn't want to be. As we drove around the Dingle Peninsula, we counted our blessings that we weren't there in summer, trying to navigate between the tour buses on those winding roads.

Only downside: the shorter days.
mlongobard is offline  
Oct 27th, 2005, 02:11 PM
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No reason not to go in February. Some of the historical sites won't be open, but plenty will be. I think that generally I would lean towards the SW but it is a very small island so weather variances aren't huge. For instance, I wouldn't tell you to stay away from Northern Colorado because the weather is so much worse than Southern CO, and that's 400 miles.

Bill
wojazz3 is offline  
Oct 27th, 2005, 04:49 PM
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Hello, rockslide - my husband and I are two more people who love to travel to places that are cool and wintry, so you are not alone! And yes, we hear from the "sunbirds" about our strange preference.

In fact, our wedding anniversary in in January, and we went to the mts. for our honeymoon -- it was great, especially when a snowstorm blew in, and, as you said, romantic!

Another benefit is having fewer tourists when you travel in the late fall and winter -- it's the best!

Now we're retired to the Northwest, where it's usually cool, green, and moist -- just like Ireland. So, can't think of anything better than your plans.

Ireland is magical!
You'll have a grand honeymoon!!

Cheers,
Sue

suelh is offline  
Oct 28th, 2005, 11:55 AM
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Thanks for everyone's thoughts on Ireland in winter. This website is great. I have already learned so much about my upcoming trip--and I only signed on two days ago.

Suelh, it is nice to know there's another "winter-y" kind of person out there. How long did you spend in Ireland?

rockslide is offline  
Oct 28th, 2005, 03:37 PM
  #10  
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One thing that is very important when you come to Ireland is to have very good waterproof shoes. Many people come with light footware and end up cold with damp wet feet.
May I give you and you fiance an Irish toast:
'May you be poor in misfortune
Rich in blessings
Slow to make enemies
Quick to make friends.
But rich or poor,quick or slow,
May you know nothing but happiness
From this day forward'

Cheers
CU is offline  
Nov 17th, 2005, 11:45 AM
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Rockslide: sorry, I just saw your question today, in response to my earlier post (I was checking for a weather comment for a relative who's going to Dublin in December).

To reply, we were in Ireland for three weeks. Our trip was magical and grand, with wonderful people and terrific experiences.

Warmest wishes,
Sue
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