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First trip to Ireland this October? Good time of year?

First trip to Ireland this October? Good time of year?

Old Jul 1st, 2011, 03:20 PM
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First trip to Ireland this October? Good time of year?

We'd like to go to Europe this October, and Ireland has long been on our list of countries to visit.

Due to work constraints, we can only travel in early October. Other than the Ring of Kerry I don't have anything planned.

I realize we won't be there during festivals, but we're happy to miss the crowds.

I'm wondering if October is a good sightseeing time. I don't mind cool weather as I find it much easier to walk than in the heat of summer, but I'd prefer not to choose the rainiest month either, as we'd like to really appreciate the stunning scenery.

I understand there may well be some fog or mist, but if it's likely to be blustery and rainy for days on end, we maybe should think of going somewhere else.

I also really understand that no one can predict what will happen, I guess I'm just looking for the law of averages. Hopefully someone who lives there, or who travels there alot can put a light on this for us.

Many thanks.
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Old Jul 1st, 2011, 05:15 PM
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Ireland doesn;t have heat in the summer. I has a generally mild climate all year - ranging from warmish to coolish - very rarely any extremes. The problem with october is that the days are starting to get short and you are quite far north - so you will need to start out quite early every am to see a lot.

Also expect a lot of damp -- ranging from mist (very common) through drizzle to actual rain. Many dry days are also grey. Very rarely is the rain hard enough to prevent you from doing anything (except camping) but it cam make it get dark even earlier.

You should have a fine time as long as you adapt to the timing.

Separately I don;t think much of the scenery is stunning. The Alps are stunning - or the Amalfi cost. Ireland is very green and pretty and peaceful - but stunning is limited.
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Old Jul 2nd, 2011, 01:51 AM
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Yes October is fine. depending on where you go there might still be things going on. I would though consider what to do as well as the Ring because to be honest there is no point on driving round there if the weathers bad on the day you are there. Perhaps fly into Dublin for a couple of days, head across to Kenmare or Killarney for 2 days breaking the trip with a night in Kilkenny then finish up in Galway or Clare before flying out of Shannon. suggested route could be either way round and Shannon is user friendly and a calmer introduction into Irish driving.
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Old Jul 2nd, 2011, 02:13 AM
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www.weather2travel.com › ... › Europe › Ireland -

Climate guides like 3 daily hours of sunshine fog rain

alot farther north than you might think

Prefer Southern Europe for better weather then personally...

www.metropole.it

www.hoteldelfino.com

for better weather then great food beautiful vistas...

Otel.com good deals on the Delfino off season from $60 US

from personal experience recently.
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Old Jul 2nd, 2011, 02:47 AM
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For me, the best part of visiting Ireland is the welcoming nature of just about all the people I've ever encountered there. October won't change that.

Days will be a bit shorter then (early October days about the same length as early March), but daylight savings time will help.

For a wild nature experience, I especially enjoy some of the coastal areas north of Galway. Clifton is a good choice to base travel for a few days. Further south, I also found the scenery around Mallow to be gorgeous. If you're looking for a splurge, the Longuevill House at Mallow would be a great place (and one of the few spots where I got non-mushy vegetables).

Don
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Old Jul 2nd, 2011, 03:27 AM
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Agree with Don that the people are the best part of Ireland and there is some wonderful scenery all over. There will be fewer tourists but all the sights will still be open. (by the way, in case you are googling, it is "Clifden") There is gorgeous scenery in Connemara (between Clifden and Galway city.

Tony's suggestion for itinerary is a good one in my opinion. If you choose not to do the Ring of Kerry while in Killarney, there is Muckross House and gardens, Ross Castle, etc. And I have driven the Ring in some pretty wet weather and still found it enjoyable. There are lots of little villages to stop and check out. Waterville and Sneem are two of my favorites. Staigue Fort (an iron age stone fort with walls 12 feet thick and high) is worth a quick visit even in bad weather.

When I lived there, I remember the weather as mild (at least to a New Englander). I was usualoly outside with just a heavy sweater or light jacket unless it was really bucketing down.

If you are looking for the "law of averages", it could be blustery, rainy, foggy, clear, all on the same day.

Even though it is farther north than US, which does shorten the days, the weather is ameliorated by the Gulf Stream. You will see palm trees growing there. In December there were still roses blooming in our garden and daffs and bulbs were beginning to bloom at the end of February.

Go and enjoy!
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Old Jul 2nd, 2011, 03:27 AM
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Agree with Don that the people are the best part of Ireland and there is some wonderful scenery all over. There will be fewer tourists but all the sights will still be open. (by the way, in case you are googling, it is "Clifden") There is gorgeous scenery in Connemara (between Clifden and Galway city.

Tony's suggestion for itinerary is a good one in my opinion. If you choose not to do the Ring of Kerry while in Killarney, there is Muckross House and gardens, Ross Castle, etc. And I have driven the Ring in some pretty wet weather and still found it enjoyable. There are lots of little villages to stop and check out. Waterville and Sneem are two of my favorites. Staigue Fort (an iron age stone fort with walls 12 feet thick and high) is worth a quick visit even in bad weather.

When I lived there, I remember the weather as mild (at least to a New Englander). I was usualoly outside with just a heavy sweater or light jacket unless it was really bucketing down.

If you are looking for the "law of averages", it could be blustery, rainy, foggy, clear, all on the same day.

Even though it is farther north than US, which does shorten the days, the weather is ameliorated by the Gulf Stream. You will see palm trees growing there. In December there were still roses blooming in our garden and daffs and bulbs were beginning to bloom at the end of February.

Go and enjoy!
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Old Jul 2nd, 2011, 03:39 AM
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irishface, thanks for the correction re: Clifden/Clifton!
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Old Jul 2nd, 2011, 05:39 PM
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Thanks to everyone for taking the time to thoughtfully reply.
Palm trees in Ireland!?!?

It's actually caused me to reconsider where we go.

I'm now giving some thought to a week in London and another week somewhere else, possibly Amsterdam, maybe Spain for the two weeks.

It's rather painfully obvious that I don't have much of a clue right now, lol, and am casting around for ideas, but I do think larger historical cities are a draw.

Thanks again, and I'll be reposting when I get a clearer idea, or at least manage to narrow things down a bit.

Cheers.
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Old Jul 2nd, 2011, 06:34 PM
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We have been to Ireland a couple of times in October and think it is a great time to go. On our last fall trip the weather was in the 50's and we had a bit of misty rain but no downpours. Most sites are still open but the crowds are gone, so no long lines or traffic to deal with. Finding a nice place to stay without a reservation is easier. The scenery will still be amazing, especially on the west coast, and the pubs will be open; you might even have a nice seat in front of a lovely peat fire. I wouldn't hesitate to go back in October.
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Old Jul 2nd, 2011, 07:19 PM
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Yep, palm trees and banana trees. Ireland amazes around every corner.

I've been there in September and it was lovely; wouldn't hesitate to go in October given the chance. Lately I must go in the summer because of taking grandchildren and working around school schedules.

Think of the southwest...stunning scenery and wonderful people (okay, they are wonderful everywhere). Come up with an itinerary and we Ire-o-philes will help you refine it.
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Old Jul 2nd, 2011, 07:39 PM
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We spent seven days in Ireland during October three years ago. First of all, our tour director, in the package received ahead of departure, told us, "You will not need your heavy winter coat." Well, we could not have been more relieved that we chose to bring our waterproof down coats anyway. (And, we're New Englanders.)

It rained off and on day of arrival and throughout our stay, with not only periods of very heavy rain, but torrential downpours that required our plans to be modified several times. It was also colder than "chilly" most of the time (and never pleasantly warm), especially along coastal areas (Cliffs of Moher, for example). It rained throughout most of our drive around the Ring of Kerry and, due to fallen trees, our drive around Dingle Peninsula was cancelled. We had a few hours in Dingle Town in the pouring down rain. Everyone was quickly soaked to the skin just ducking into and out of shops. It rained most of the two days we were in Killarney.

We did have a few periods of sunshine and saw plenty of rainbows.

Regardless, we enjoyed the entire trip. The scenery was splendid, despite the weather. Our stay at an inn close to the water in Dingle could not have been more atmosphere with the thunder, lightning, downpouring rain - but with fireplaces going and hot cocktails.

Our original plan was to go on our own and rent a car. But, I found this package (Ireland Expert) with just about the itinerary we had in mind that was more economical (given the hotels and included meals along with included admissions) than we could have booked independently.

We knew immediately that it was a far better choice to enjoy all the scenery from seats on a bus with panoramic windows that negotiate the roads in a tiny vehicle ourselves.

Ireland had long been on our list of places to visit as well. We were totally glad we went and thoroughly enjoyed the entire trip.

The weather during our trip was probably "worst case scenario". And, for sure, there were no crowds anywhere.

I would note that the daylight hours were short, not light until almost 8 AM and dark by 7 PM.

We very much enjoy history, architecture, etc., as well, but our trip to Ireland was an amazing opportunity to relax and enjoy miles and miles and miles of extraordinary scenery.
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Old Jul 13th, 2011, 03:26 PM
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I'll be there this october so wave if you see me. I've been in every month but July and August. I've always managed to have a great time regardless of weather.
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Old Jul 13th, 2011, 05:12 PM
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I am going back for my fourth trip this Sept. I would go to Ireland in the Winter. It is the history, the pubs, the graveyards, love reading those tombstones. The people are amazing. I think the scenery is amazing. The cliffs, the seashore at Lahinch, Dingle and Kerry. GO!!!
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Old Jan 4th, 2015, 07:03 AM
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We are also planning a trip to Ireland and Scotland in 2015. We are currently at ground zero with absolutely no plan. Any advice on when and where to start would be helpful.
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Old Jan 4th, 2015, 03:23 PM
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Not digging up a 3yr old post and starting a New question might be good advice, Having a look at some guide books and the forum trip reports. Then decide when and how long. No point asking how long is a piece of string if you don't even know what colour it is?
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