Carrying a Bottle of Water

Old Sep 2nd, 2013, 08:14 PM
  #21  
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 2,832
Received 26 Likes on 5 Posts
It's not just American tourists who carry those "honking" bottles of water. Here in Vienna there are "trinkwasser" fountains supplying alpine fresh water throughout the major tourist areas, and the queues to fill the 1,5 liter bottles resemble roll call at the UN.
fourfortravel is online now  
Old Sep 2nd, 2013, 09:30 PM
  #22  
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,386
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
i also need water, and am the master of getting it at restaurants when they are not keen on serving it. (i wave a handful of pills around. shhhhh don't tell.)

i have carried a mesh bag with water, when i can't fit it in my purse. i have also carried the collapsible kind (like a thick baggie with a top) which allows me to only carry it until it's smaller and can easily fit into my purse or pocket.

the mesh bags are hard to find now. they used to be sort of an l.a. trend 15 years ago. at the link below, they aren't for sale anymore, but it will give you an idea. with the mesh, you can also stuff it in a pocket when you are done with the bottle. hope this helps. here's the link.
http://www.amazon.com/Liberty-Mounta.../dp/B001OPK62C
kawh is offline  
Old Sep 2nd, 2013, 09:37 PM
  #23  
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 7,960
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Carry a SMALL water bottle in your purse and refill it during the day , easy to do in Rome and Paris and I am sure it wouldn't be any harder in northern countries. Tap water is safe , and many cities have drinking water fountains.

I don't carry water around unless its very hot... I can survive an hour or two without it.. but some people have gotten used to it( you can't all be on medication that makes your mouths dry, lol )

Frankly all that water drinking will lead to another much harder issue to deal with,, finding bathrooms, lol good luck.
justineparis is offline  
Old Sep 2nd, 2013, 09:37 PM
  #24  
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 7,763
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
<i>I think it's only American tourists who are carrying those honking big bottles of water. Not sure why they are so much thirstier than everyone else, but whenever I see someone with a huge bottle of water, it's definitely not a local and usually an American.</i>

We do it because it's a comfort mechanism (kinda like Linus's blanket) -- it reminds us of our giant drink containers that we fill with ice and pepsi and get free refills on. It reminds us of more civilized places where you don't get charged for rolls or water with your meals.
sparkchaser is offline  
Old Sep 2nd, 2013, 09:43 PM
  #25  
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 7,763
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
<i>Weird. Carrying water used to be just for wilderness travel. This urban necessity is a genuine mass oddity. What might have caused it? More to the point, why are you all so thirsty? A liter or two a day? I don't drink even that much gin, much less water.</i>

We travelers can't be bothered to stop and buy an overpriced drink every time they're thirsty. We have 17 sites to see today and have a very strict itinerary. And stopping at a cafe for a beverage is not on the itinerary. Now, hurry up, the clock tower is going to start chiming in three minutes and I want to be there when it happens.
sparkchaser is offline  
Old Sep 2nd, 2013, 09:47 PM
  #26  
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 10,298
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
My last European visit was this July/August, and it was H O T. Many, many people, tourists and "locals" alike (or anyway, Poles and Czechs visiting Polish and Czech sights) were carrying water around. I was very sorry I always forgot to do so. Did I mention it was hot???

It sounds like the size of your purse is the problem. Why not just carry a slightly larger bag and pack one of those aluminum-y looking water bottles? Much better for the environment than buying plastic bottles day after day.
Leely2 is offline  
Old Sep 3rd, 2013, 12:02 AM
  #27  
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 18,130
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I agree with leely2. Why not carry a slightly bigger bag which will hold a re-usable water bottle?
You can refill it from a tap, since tap water is very drinkable.
If you are unhappy with that idea buy big bottles of water and refill your re-usable bottle from those. Tap water is the most environmentally friendly option. If you buy plastic bottles make sure you put them in the correct recycling bin.
hetismij2 is offline  
Old Sep 3rd, 2013, 12:10 AM
  #28  
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 7,763
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Yeah, July/Aug was crazy hot. Lots of water and ice cream were the orders of the day.
sparkchaser is offline  
Old Sep 3rd, 2013, 02:02 AM
  #29  
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 76
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
My sister gave me a couple of collapsible water bottles with clips on the top. Great to have since they pack flat;just fill when needed. I also use only a small shoulder bag when traveling, so I clip the bottle to the purse strap. Easy! Not sure where she got them.Check on-line camping/hiking stores like REI.
harriet_hughes is offline  
Old Sep 3rd, 2013, 02:31 AM
  #30  
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 20,199
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Some of you who mock people who carry water should have a kidney stone or two. You'd shut up pretty quickly.
seetheworld is offline  
Old Sep 3rd, 2013, 02:42 AM
  #31  
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 7,763
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Nobody is mocking anyone for wanting to stay hydrated. The mockery is for self-conscious people looking to stay hydrated and blend in. Nobody cares that you're carrying around a 500mL or 300mL bottle of water.
sparkchaser is offline  
Old Sep 3rd, 2013, 06:32 AM
  #32  
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 356
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
DH and I always carry a small day pack, even when we are out for a couple hours. It holds the camera, umbrella, hat for DH, a sweater or rain jacket and reusable water bottles. If you are self-conscious about carrying a water bottle or want your hands free then just use the day pack, you will see lots of people everywhere with them!!
Snowflake25 is offline  
Old Sep 3rd, 2013, 06:58 AM
  #33  
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 4,350
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
<We travelers can't be bothered to stop and buy an overpriced drink every time they're thirsty. We have 17 sites to see today and have a very strict itinerary. And stopping at a cafe for a beverage is not on the itinerary. Now, hurry up, the clock tower is going to start chiming in three minutes and I want to be there when it happens.>

sparkchaser...That is pretty darn close to the truth. I don't want to have to find a restaurant or market every time I am thirsty, and I especially don't want to have to pay for water. I have a budget to stick to after all!

Think of how many more days I can travel, how many more sites I can visit, how many more souvenirs I can purchase because I didn't have to purchase those extra couple drinks everyday!
michele_d is offline  
Old Sep 3rd, 2013, 07:06 AM
  #34  
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 7,960
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I love it when people throw stuff out like diabetes and kidney stones. Had both,, still manage to live my life with only carrying a small bottle of water that is refilled in my purse. don't need to be a camel and carry a days supply .
justineparis is offline  
Old Sep 3rd, 2013, 07:09 AM
  #35  
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 7,960
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
PS A kidney stone is worse then back labour , in transition, with no break between contractions... worst pain ever, lol So yes, I understand one never wants to experience that twice!
justineparis is offline  
Old Sep 3rd, 2013, 08:33 AM
  #36  
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 20,199
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Did I mention a days supply?

No.

Some of you need to figure out what 500 ml really is lol.
seetheworld is offline  
Old Sep 3rd, 2013, 09:30 AM
  #37  
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 7,763
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Carry one of those canvas/cotton grocery bags everyone in Europe carries and stick your water in there. Problem solved AND you're doing it how the locals do it when they do it.
sparkchaser is offline  
Old Sep 3rd, 2013, 10:38 AM
  #38  
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 57,890
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Agree about kidney stones - but general health advice is that everyone should stay hydrated - unless there is a specific reason to avoid water.

And it's nothing to do with not wanting to stop.

We always stop for lunch in a cafe or similar and usually stop in late afternoon for a drink (not water) and cafe sitting/people watching. But I don't want to stop 5 or 6 times because I feel like a drink. (And, in my office, when people come to a meeting almost all bring their water bottles - or other beverage of choice - smartwater, fruit water, etc - with them.)
nytraveler is offline  
Old Sep 3rd, 2013, 10:58 AM
  #39  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 15,420
Likes: 0
Received 11 Likes on 4 Posts
I spent the first half of my life thirsty much of the time. I remember many occasions when I had to find a place for a drink and it wasn't so easy. Then I figured out that I could carry around a bottle of fizzy water and my life has vastly improved.

I always carry a purse large enough for a bottle of fizzy water. And it's frequently a full liter bottle. I'm a heavy drinker.

I get an itch in my throat and start coughing, and it is at that moment that I want to feel that fizzy water in the back of the throat and stop it. I am relieved that I don't have look for a place to stop, sit down, and order it whenever I get that feeling.

This has nothing to do with style or cultural trends and everything to do with comfort and convenience.
Nikki is offline  
Old Sep 3rd, 2013, 11:25 AM
  #40  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 34,883
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I do usually carry some water with me with I am a tourist and out and about all day, but I like smaller bottles, about 33 cl are usually the smallest you can buy. I just have a tote bag and some pockets in it, it's not hard to carry that around. I don't actually find 50 cl (or 500 ml) that big a burden, though. It wouldn't fit in my handbag, though.

It is true that I don't typically carry water around with me as a local, even when I go out for the day to visit or museum or something. I think that's because when I'm at home, I may do some activity like that, but usually only for a couple hours, I'm not gone all day.

I don't think you need a 50 cl bottle if you are only gone an hour or two for a stroll, it's easy to buy 33 cl water bottles.
Christina is online now  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Manage Preferences - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Your Privacy Choices -