Belize

TRAVEL GUIDE

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It’s easy to become immersed in the natural beauty of Belize. Broadleaf canopies shelter exotic birds, and ancient Mayan ruins are wrapped in vines. Underwater caves and the chute of the Blue Hole offer some of the world’s best diving, and the Belize Barrier Reef astounds snorkelers with a lavish medley of coral and fish. Belize’s secluded resorts embrace these surroundings: here, you can sleep under a palm-thatched roof in a lush jungle lodge and escape to a dreamy overwater bungalow with turquoise sea views all on the same trip.

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Ambergris Caye and San Pedro

At 25 miles (40 km) long and 4.5 miles (7 km) wide at its widest point, Ambergris is the queen of the cayes. Here the Northern Barrier Reef...

Belize City

Belize City is more of a town than a city—few of the ramshackle buildings here are taller than a palm tree, and the official population within...

Caye Caulker

A half-hour away from San Pedro by water taxi and sharing essentially the same reef and sea ecosystems, Caye Caulker is very different from...

San Ignacio

When you see the Hawksworth Bridge, built in 1949 and the only public suspension bridge in Belize, you'll know you've arrived at San Ignacio...

Punta Gorda

Most journeys south begin in the region's administrative center, Punta Gorda. PG (as it's affectionately known) isn't your typical tourist...

Belmopan City

It used to be said that the best way to see Belize's capital, which was moved here from Belize City in 1970, was through the rearview mirror...

Placencia Village

Placencia Village is a mini, downscale version of Key West, laid-back, hip, and full of atmospheric watering holes. At the end of the road,...

Hopkins Village

Hopkins is an intriguing Garífuna coastal village of about 1,800 people, halfway between Dangriga and Placencia. Garífuna culture is more accessible...

Corozal Town

Settled by refugees from the Yucatán during the 19th-century Caste Wars, Corozal is the last town before Río Hondo, the river separating Belize...

Mountain Pine Ridge

The best way to describe Mountain Pine Ridge is to paraphrase Winston Churchill: it's a puzzle wrapped in an enigma. Instead of the tropical...

Dangriga

With a population of around 9,000, Dangriga is the largest town in the south and the home of the Garífuna or Black Caribs, as they're also known...

Orange Walk Town

Orange Walk Town is barely on the radar of most visitors, except as a jumping-off point for boat trips to Lamanai, road trips to Gallon Jug...

Northern Peninsula and Maya Beach

Some of the best beaches on the Placencia Peninsula—and therefore on mainland Belize—are at the northern end of the peninsula and the Maya Beach...

Sarteneja

The bay setting of the Mestizo and Creole community of Sarteneja makes it one of the most relaxed and appealing destinations in Belize. It's...

Southern Cayes and Southern Coast

A few miles off the coast of southern Stann Creek District are several small islands with equally small tourism operations. If Placencia and...

Benque Viejo

Old Bank, or Benque Viejo in Spanish, is the last town in Belize before you reach Guatemala. Modest in size and population (about 9,000), Benque...

Crooked Tree Wildlife Sanctuary

Crooked Tree Wildlife Sanctuary is one of Belize's top birding spots. The 16,400-acre sanctuary includes more than 3,000 acres of lagoons, swamp...

Copper Bank

Copper Bank is a tidy and small (population around 500) Mestizo fishing village on Corozal Bay. The village is something of a footnote to the...

Glover's Reef Atoll

Named after the pirate John Glover, this coral necklace strung around an 80-square-mile (208-square-km) lagoon is the southernmost of Belize...

Lighthouse Reef Atoll, the Blue Hole, and Half Moon Caye

If Robinson Crusoe had been a man of means, he would have repaired here for a break from his desert island. Lighthouse Reef is about 18 miles...

Caracol

Caracol (Spanish for "snail") is the most spectacular Mayan site in Belize, as well as one of the most impressive in Central America. It was...

Tobacco Caye

Tobacco Caye is at the northern tip of the South Water Caye Marine Reserve, a 62-square-mile (160-square-km) reserve that's popular for diving...

Seine Bight

Like Placencia, its Creole neighbor to the south, Seine Bight is a small village. It may not be for long, though, as Placencia's resorts are...

Gallon Jug

The 130,000 acres of Gallon Jug Estates, owned by the family of the late Sir Barry Bowen, is home to old-growth mahogany trees and many other...

South Water Caye

This is one of our favorite underrated spots in Belize. The 15-acre South Water Caye has good off-the-beaten-reef diving and snorkeling in a...

Cockscomb Basin Wildlife Sanctuary

The mighty jaguar, once the undisputed king of the Central and South American jungles, is now endangered. But it has a haven in the Cockscomb...

Rio Bravo Conservation and Management Area

Created with the help of distinguished British naturalist Gerald Durrell, the Río Bravo Conservation & Management Area spans 260,000 acres...

St. George's Caye

Just a stone's throw from Belize City, St. George’s Caye is steeped in history. The country of Belize had its origins here, as St. George's...

Turneffe Atoll

The largest of the three atolls, Turneffe, is the closest to Belize City. It's one of the best spots for diving, thanks to several steep drop...

Lamanai

Lamanai ("submerged crocodile" in Yucatec Maya) is Belize's longest-occupied Mayan site, inhabited until well after Christopher Columbus "discovered...

Altun Ha

If you've never experienced an ancient Mayan city, make a trip to Altun Ha, which is a modern translation of the Mayan name "Rockstone Pond...

Mennonite Communities

...

Belize City

Belize City is more of a town than a city—few of the ramshackle buildings here are taller than a palm tree, and the official population within...

San Ignacio

When you see the Hawksworth Bridge, built in 1949 and the only public suspension bridge in Belize, you'll know you've arrived at San Ignacio...

Punta Gorda

Most journeys south begin in the region's administrative center, Punta Gorda. PG (as it's affectionately known) isn't your typical tourist...

Belmopan City

It used to be said that the best way to see Belize's capital, which was moved here from Belize City in 1970, was through the rearview mirror...

Placencia Village

Placencia Village is a mini, downscale version of Key West, laid-back, hip, and full of atmospheric watering holes. At the end of the road,...

Hopkins Village

Hopkins is an intriguing Garífuna coastal village of about 1,800 people, halfway between Dangriga and Placencia. Garífuna culture is more accessible...

Corozal Town

Settled by refugees from the Yucatán during the 19th-century Caste Wars, Corozal is the last town before Río Hondo, the river separating Belize...

Mountain Pine Ridge

The best way to describe Mountain Pine Ridge is to paraphrase Winston Churchill: it's a puzzle wrapped in an enigma. Instead of the tropical...

Dangriga

With a population of around 9,000, Dangriga is the largest town in the south and the home of the Garífuna or Black Caribs, as they're also known...

Northern Peninsula and Maya Beach

Some of the best beaches on the Placencia Peninsula—and therefore on mainland Belize—are at the northern end of the peninsula and the Maya Beach...

Orange Walk Town

Orange Walk Town is barely on the radar of most visitors, except as a jumping-off point for boat trips to Lamanai, road trips to Gallon Jug...

Sarteneja

The bay setting of the Mestizo and Creole community of Sarteneja makes it one of the most relaxed and appealing destinations in Belize. It's...

Benque Viejo

Old Bank, or Benque Viejo in Spanish, is the last town in Belize before you reach Guatemala. Modest in size and population (about 9,000), Benque...

Copper Bank

Copper Bank is a tidy and small (population around 500) Mestizo fishing village on Corozal Bay. The village is something of a footnote to the...

Caracol

Caracol (Spanish for "snail") is the most spectacular Mayan site in Belize, as well as one of the most impressive in Central America. It was...

Rio Bravo Conservation and Management Area

Created with the help of distinguished British naturalist Gerald Durrell, the Río Bravo Conservation & Management Area spans 260,000 acres...

Seine Bight

Like Placencia, its Creole neighbor to the south, Seine Bight is a small village. It may not be for long, though, as Placencia's resorts are...

Gallon Jug

The 130,000 acres of Gallon Jug Estates, owned by the family of the late Sir Barry Bowen, is home to old-growth mahogany trees and many other...

Altun Ha

If you've never experienced an ancient Mayan city, make a trip to Altun Ha, which is a modern translation of the Mayan name "Rockstone Pond...

Lamanai

Lamanai ("submerged crocodile" in Yucatec Maya) is Belize's longest-occupied Mayan site, inhabited until well after Christopher Columbus "discovered...

Mennonite Communities

...

The Cayes and Atolls

Imagine heading back to shore after a day of snorkeling, the white prow of your boat pointing toward billowing clouds, the sky's base darkening...

The Southern Coast

The transition from one landscape to another is often swift and startling in Belize. As you approach the Hummingbird Highway's end in coastal...

The Cayo District

When the first jungle lodges opened in the early 1980s in the Cayo, few thought this wild area would become a tourist magnet. The mountainous...

Northern Belize

Razzmatazz and bling are in short supply in northern Belize. Here you'll find more orange groves than beach bars, more sugarcane than sugary...

The Deep South

Toledo District in the Deep South has Belize's only extensive, genuine rain forest, and its canopy of trees conceals a plethora of wildlife...

Placencia Peninsula

The Placencia Peninsula is fast becoming one of the major visitor destinations in Belize, one that may eventually rival Ambergris Caye as the...

The Maya Heartland

Drive a few miles out of town, and you find yourself in the heartland of the Mayan people. Half the population of Toledo is Maya, a far higher...

Ambergris Caye and San Pedro

At 25 miles (40 km) long and 4.5 miles (7 km) wide at its widest point, Ambergris is the queen of the cayes. Here the Northern Barrier Reef...

Caye Caulker

A half-hour away from San Pedro by water taxi and sharing essentially the same reef and sea ecosystems, Caye Caulker is very different from...

Southern Cayes and Southern Coast

A few miles off the coast of southern Stann Creek District are several small islands with equally small tourism operations. If Placencia and...

Glover's Reef Atoll

Named after the pirate John Glover, this coral necklace strung around an 80-square-mile (208-square-km) lagoon is the southernmost of Belize...

Lighthouse Reef Atoll, the Blue Hole, and Half Moon Caye

If Robinson Crusoe had been a man of means, he would have repaired here for a break from his desert island. Lighthouse Reef is about 18 miles...

Tobacco Caye

Tobacco Caye is at the northern tip of the South Water Caye Marine Reserve, a 62-square-mile (160-square-km) reserve that's popular for diving...

South Water Caye

This is one of our favorite underrated spots in Belize. The 15-acre South Water Caye has good off-the-beaten-reef diving and snorkeling in a...

Turneffe Atoll

The largest of the three atolls, Turneffe, is the closest to Belize City. It's one of the best spots for diving, thanks to several steep drop...

St. George's Caye

Just a stone's throw from Belize City, St. George’s Caye is steeped in history. The country of Belize had its origins here, as St. George's...

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Fodor's Belize
Whether you want to dive the Blue Hole, explore Mayan ruins, or go cave tubing, the local...

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