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Photography Tour

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Oct 14th, 2012, 08:29 PM
  #1
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Photography Tour

My two daugthers are interested in taking a photo walking tour. They have taken photography classes and each have a good camera. They are 14 and 15 years old so we would need to tag along with them on the tour but would like a tour that we could either pay to be observers or just walk along since we won't be taking any photos. It seem the costs are from $100 to $140 for 2 hours so we would need to have a company that would allow us to pay as an observer or "tag along". Any recommendations or suggestions? There seem to be many companies that do these tours so it was overwhelming to choose.
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Oct 15th, 2012, 07:40 AM
  #2
 
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There are two kinds of photos, keepsakes and more interesting stuff. If they want the more interesting stuff, why should they shoot what others have shot? Kids tend to be more open to their own inventions. NYC is a great walking city and they just should carry their cameras with them, because you will never know what you will come upon.

I would tell them to look at what others have shot and not do that.

I have lived here all my life and have had participated in two dozen photographic exhibits and there is always something to see and shoot. For starters try the High Line, I love the angles, colors, perspectives, and lines. Central Park and Washington Square Park are terrific for people and the East and West Villages are good for general stuff.

Save money and let them be creative.
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Oct 15th, 2012, 08:18 AM
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Aduchamp, I think you are doing a disservice to photographers who offer this kind of walking tour. They don't lead you around and say "here, photograph this!". There is a lot one can learn if the guide is good...about composition, point of view, lighting. There is no reason a teenager should find learning about photographic technique to be stifling of their creativity. Quite the contrary...they may find ways to expand their vision.

that said....I'm afraid I have no recommendations to make.
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Oct 15th, 2012, 09:44 AM
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No doubt they can learn better technique. So you do think some surrogate teacher/authority figure/expert will change the way they shoot things?

The comparison is to a regular travel tour. I am sure a travel tour is more efficient, but it is their vision of the world, not yours.

They are teens, let them be free and enjoy themselves and make their own mistakes and have their own successes. It certainly makes life more interesting and in this case more reliant on their natural talents and intincts.
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Oct 15th, 2012, 12:14 PM
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Adu, as a photographer, I do understand your point of view, but don't forget the benefits of sharing with others and discussing the ways works could be edited for more impact. Sometimes, a more experienced, or just a different eye can be helpful. And, as you mention, better technique--who wouldn't want that?!

There is a digital photography club in nearby Annapolis and we have gone as a group to NYC, taken pix and then compared shots later. The club members run the gamut from beginning elementary school student to retired pro.

As teens, they will make plenty of mistakes--why not have some professional help? Isn't that why many people go to school?

But back to WorldGallery's question: if there is an age minimum, you may be required to come along. I've always wanted to go on one of those trips but price and being out in the sun have always been deterrents. Please let us know about your experience.
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Oct 15th, 2012, 12:45 PM
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As teens, they will make plenty of mistakes--why not have some professional help? Isn't that why many people go to school?

Let kids breath, especially creative kids. There is great value in mistakes, and more value in figuring their own way out. And in the arts their are always happy accidents. Some of the most interesting work is because the light, the composition, the lines were off. Let kids develop their own confidence and style.

The question here is technique over letting someone breath.

It is like grammarians, 75% percent know how to say nothing perfectly.
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Oct 15th, 2012, 02:48 PM
  #7
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Thanks for the links.
The main reason for the tour is so that they can learn more about the cameras they have, while being in an amazing place. We bought them used professional cameras with many modes and features. I didn't realize there was so much to learn! Some of the tours I looked at teach long exposure for night shooting, white balance, shooting in mixed lighting conditions, etc. These are all things they have touched on in prior classes and I was amazed how quickly they learned it, but wouldn't have without guidance because the cameras are complex. I get so frustrated with cameras and prefer a point and shoot but they want to learn.
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Oct 15th, 2012, 06:12 PM
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Can't help with a specific tour - but why not double check the rules? Don't see any reason they canp;t go on the tour alone - and meet you wherever the tour ends. (Since I can't imagine they will let you go along for free).) They're teens - not toddlers.
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Oct 15th, 2012, 07:07 PM
  #9
 
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Living Social sometimes sells photography tours that are given by workshops on NYC but just cost less, and are limited to certain dates and beginner classes which should be ok for your daughters.
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Oct 16th, 2012, 02:11 PM
  #10
 
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Before you choose a tour, make sure you read the fine print. Alot of them say "you should be familiar with how your camera operates".

So they should know where the buttons are for white balance, apeture, shutter speed, etc. If they know where the buttons are, then when they need to do a long exposure, they can turn the dials or buttons to a "bulb" setting or increase the exposure time.

Wish I could join you. Sounds like fun.
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Oct 16th, 2012, 09:36 PM
  #11
 
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While another photographer will know about white balance, etc. he or she might not know that model and which button to push any way. And if there are others on the tour, it can get a bit tedious if someone occupies the time because they do not know how operate their camera. Before anyone travels any where with a new camera, they should go and shoot 100's of shots. With digital it does not cost anything. Also bring the manual to NYC in case a question arises.
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