San Miguel De Allende day trips

Old Jun 3rd, 2021, 09:52 AM
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San Miguel De Allende day trips

I thought I’d do a few trip reports from around the San Miguel area, places that aren’t necessarily ‘off the beaten path’, but maybe somewhat, that might be worth a look. I've purposely left off places like Queretaro, Guanajuato & Dolores Hidalgo since they are frequently visited.
Mineral De Pozos is an easy day trip from San Miguel, about a 45 minute drive. But you’d need to have a car or hire a driver, as there really is no public transportation to the ruins and no taxis in town. I think our first visit there was almost 20 years ago and things have changed considerably. The road from hwy 57 back then was rocky and rutted, it’s now paved with stone. Some of the old buildings near the mines have been restored, and others are now fenced off. But it’s still an interesting place and great for photos. The town itself has experienced an increase in tourism, which has resulted in a number of new shops and restaurants, which is good, but at the expense of some of the rustic charm.
Pozos was the home of 2 major mining concerns. The Cinco Señores hacienda and its ruins are located up on the hill. It was established in the late 1800’s and consisted of a handful of mines. It continued in production until the late 1930’s when the mines were flooded by underground rivers, after which the town was essentially abandoned. At its peak, there were some 50,000 people living and working in the Pozos area. If you enter on the road from highway 57, you enter right by the aforementioned ruins. There is a small fee to enter the ex-hacienda if you’re so inclined, but you can still wander around most of the other buildings for free. The other main hacienda and mine is hacienda Santa Brigida, located down in the valley about 5 miles from 5 Señores. Santa Brigida was established by the Jesuits in the latter part of the 1500’s and was active throughout the 1700’s until Spain kicked them out of Mexico. Some holes were some 250 meters deep. There is a small restaurant on site, and I think entrance was like 50 pesos to the immediate area of the hacienda.
Interestingly, as many times as I’ve been to Pozos, until only recently did I happen upon the iconic ovens which I’d seen often in pictures. I figured they were destroyed, but they’re at the site of the Santa Brigida mine where I’d not been before.
In Pozos, a favorite stop for lunch is at the Posada De Las Minas, a beautifully restored casona with restaurant and boutique hotel lodging.
If you’re able to get to Pozos, you could supplement the trip with a stop in San Luis De La Paz or San Jose Iturbide. Both are pleasant enough towns with lots of activity in their clean colonial centers. It’s an easy enough visit from Queretaro or Dolores Hidalgo as well, just not by public transportation.

Cinco Señores

My wife with an old goat. Besides me. Inside 5 Señores

View from up by 5 Señores

A shop selling indigenous musical instruments

The ovens at Santa Brigida

Hacienda Santa Brigida


Fixer-upper for sale.

Last edited by baldone; Jun 3rd, 2021 at 10:24 AM.
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Old Jun 14th, 2021, 10:56 AM
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Thanks for the Pozos tip. I am thinking to go to SMA in July -if my wife gives permission and i will surely find my way over there..
Btw... why are e.mail addresses not permitted on posts? I seldom go to this website but i check my e.mail every day.
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Old Jun 14th, 2021, 11:57 AM
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Originally Posted by PopHargon View Post
. . .Btw... why are e.mail addresses not permitted on posts? I seldom go to this website but i check my e.mail every day.
Welcome to Fodors. Email address are allowed but new members are not able to posts links until they have some posting history. So soon you could post your address. However the forums really aren't set up for that sort of interaction - where one posts a question and expects personal e-mail responses. The discussions work better when they play out on the public forums so others can see what advice one is receiving and agree or offer alternatives. In your profile you can set it up to get an e-mail notice from Fodors when there is activity on your threads and those you subscribe to (I'm not 100% sure but I 'think' the default set up is to receive subscribed notifications).
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Old Jun 15th, 2021, 05:54 AM
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thanks for that quick answer. i had been using mexconnect for a number of years and found this site. not sure how to use it fully and will probably only visit once or 3 times a year as i plan and make my trips to s.m.a. - as i have since '81.
i will try to post again and see if i can find an answer to my origin query.
thanks again.
p0p
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Old Jun 21st, 2021, 07:40 PM
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Bernal. I wasn’t going to include Bernal since it’s easier to get to from Queretaro than San Miguel, but it’s an easy enough trip and a charming little town, one that truly deserves being a Pueblo Mágico. And we just went there on our way to the Sierra Gorda last week, so it’s fresh on my mind.
The Peña, or monolith, that dominates the landscape in Bernal is considered one of the tallest in the world. Some believe it’s got a mystical ‘energy’; I’m not sure about that, but the town does get its share of new age type visitors. Once a year they have a night (or maybe a weekend) where all the lights are shut off so people can enjoy a night under the stars without light pollution.
There’s a handful of good restaurants, but the town is mostly known for its blue corn gorditas, as well as different varieties of cheese bread. The bread is on the sweeter side with a cream cheese filling. “El Negrito” is very popular for said gorditas, even if the little figure in front of the restaurant would never fly in the US.
To get there from San Miguel you’d either need to first take a bus to the Queretaro central and from there a second class bus. There is no bus station in Bernal, just a stop. It’s not a long walk to centro. For a return trip, you just mosey back to where the bus dropped you off. The only taxis are those little tricycle type things. If you drive your own vehicle, be aware that the toll booth on the outskirts of Queretaro can have awful waiting times so check Google maps for delays. We had a painful hour delay. Alternative routes would either take you through Queretaro on the libre which can often have heavy traffic too. Another alternative route could be the back road (hwy 510) that is quite scenic and there are a couple of wineries on the way.


View of La Peña from town

Colorful corn

The best tequila is...

Cheese bread, que rico

El Negrito

Last edited by baldone; Jun 21st, 2021 at 07:44 PM.
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Old Jun 22nd, 2021, 05:10 AM
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Good summation of Bernal in this article (just saw it):
https://mexiconewsdaily.com/mexicoli...uiet-delights/
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Old Jun 25th, 2021, 08:57 AM
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I was looking at your photo of the monolith and thinking it would be very difficult to climb (at least for me), which that following article confirmed. I'd like to visit the town.
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Old Jun 25th, 2021, 05:17 PM
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Climbing the Peña de Bernal was good exercise, a treasured memory from when I did my language courses in Querétaro. I remember one Mexican woman was having fun with me as I was climbing up and said “¡carrera!”; she laughed when I said “¡pero no quiero morir hoy!” (it was steep and one had to watch one’s step). I ended up only hiking for half an hour to about halfway to an observation point as my time in Bernal was part of tour that included a winery, Tequis and a dairy farm. Fradiavolo—most only go vía paths to this observation point about halfway up (I think one needs rock climbing equipment to make it up further).
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Old Jul 5th, 2021, 07:19 PM
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San Miguel Viejo. I’m not sure if this really qualifies as a ‘day trip’ unless you like to walk. Although you could take a taxi. It’s not terribly popular with most visitors except on ATV tours as it probably only appeals to those that enjoy some of the more obscure history of the area rather than the typical touristy stuff in town. But San Miguel Viejo, or old San Miguel, was the original site of the settlement until a better source of water was found. San Miguel’s oldest/first church is there which is the primary (only?) thing of interest. I read where local indigenous were conscripted to build the church. Maybe the bird poop on Fray Juan’s statue is some sort of payback karma? If you like to walk, take Canal down towards the bus station and continue another mile or so until you pass Bodega Aurrera and reach the railroad tracks/train station. Take a left along the tracks; it’s safe. Walk another ¾ mile or so until you reach the sewage treatment plant. Follow the dirt road until you cross the river; there will be some stepping stones or plastic pallets on which to cross. The smell is not from raw sewage, but rather from discharge from the cheese plant. The village itself is pretty rustic and not particularly interesting, although there are a couple of high end homes in the village. If you like to hike, you can see a cross up on the hill to which you can hike for a nice view of the valley and the presa. No specially marked trails, just follow the footpaths.



Bird doo-doo on Fray Juan
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