Who'da Thunk It?

Jun 4th, 2012, 04:05 AM
  #1  
ira
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Who'da Thunk It?

"Food Trucks in Paris? U.S. Cuisine Finds Open Minds, and Mouths"
(http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/04/wo...paris.html?hp#)

"An artisanal taco truck has come to Paris. The Cantine California started parking here in April, the latest in a recent American culinary invasion that includes chefs at top restaurants; trendy menu items like cheesecake, bagels and bloody Marys; and notions like chalking the names of farmers on the walls of restaurants.

In France, there is still a widespread belief that the daily diet in the United States consists of grossly large servings of fast food. But in Paris, American food is suddenly being seen as more than just restauration rapide. Among young Parisians, there is currently no greater praise for cuisine than “très Brooklyn,” a term that signifies a particularly cool combination of informality, creativity and quality".

My mind is boggled by the idea that the term "très Brooklyn" would not be the worst thing that one could say about food. (You've come a long way, baby.)

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Jun 4th, 2012, 04:53 AM
  #2  
RJD
 
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In preparation for our forthcoming trip I have done a bit of my usual food research, including the new Zagat Paris Guide.
They have not, as far as I've seen, discovered "tres Brooklyn" yet. But the Times has directed us to the new place Terroir Parisean on the Rue Monge near our rented apartment which serves a french version of hot dogs called "veau Chaud".
I'll keep an eye out for the taco truck. As you point out the young people are chiefly responsible for this growing shift in attitude. Thanks for the information.
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Jun 4th, 2012, 05:21 AM
  #3  
ira
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Hi RJ,

>...a french version of hot dogs called "veau Chaud".<

I look forward to reading your report, but be careful about being a trend setter.

It was back in the 70's, IIRC, that the first American-style hamburger shops arrived in Paris. They offered the French take on a McD burger.

They were awful.

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Jun 4th, 2012, 05:48 AM
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Chipolte opened up recently, too.
Phread is offline  
Jun 4th, 2012, 06:01 AM
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The NY Times loves writing about American food in Paris. This from a few years ago:

Hamburgers Conquer Paris | July 15, 2008
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2...dia/index.html
Related article: www.nytimes.com/2008/07/16/dining/16paris.html

Hi ira,
> My mind is boggled by the idea that the term "très Brooklyn" would not be the worst thing that one could say about food. (You've come a long way, baby.) <

I guess you haven't visited our fair borough in the last decade. Definitely the seat of a dining and drinking revolution!
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Jun 4th, 2012, 06:13 AM
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We ate a delicious Big Tasty McDonalds meal in Lake Lucerne, Switzerland last fall. Their "special sauce" was superb and the cheese was clearly not "processed". Of course they cost nearly $15 each, but we got to keep the souvenir Coca Cola glasses (which we left for the cleaning staff at our hotel in Bellagio). The fries were about the only other thing similar to the US version. Oh, and the place itself was quite classic, with marble floors, cafe tables and chairs, and crystal chandaliers.

But to the original topic, how different are food trucks to the street market rotisseries, crepe stands and the like? We've also seen changes in Paris in terms of the proliferation of Sushi places, as well as the fast food like lunch spots that offer a menu of sandwich, soup or salad and a drink and seem filled with young office workers ans shop staff.
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Jun 4th, 2012, 06:28 AM
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Ira...just you wait until we send a colorful L.A. Taco Truck to park in "downtown" Madison...just think, you and the Lady Wife will be able to eat your breakast of scrambled eggs/chorizo/salsa verde burrito, or crispy lunch taco packed in a Dorito shell, with grits(?!)..every day! Tres Madisonne!
tower is offline  
Jun 4th, 2012, 06:41 AM
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I am getting really tired of those hype articles from the NYT. It has one of the most inaccurate travel sections in the world, at least as far as Paris is concerned.
kerouac is offline  
Jun 4th, 2012, 07:47 AM
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When was Brooklyn ever associated with poor restaurant food? With so many immigrant neighborhoods, there have been interesting restaurants in that borough for as long as I've lived in NYC and almost certainly for years before that.

Nothing like the cutting edge, multi-starred restaurants of the last decade, but still a plethora of great, often very reasonably priced, eating.
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Jun 4th, 2012, 12:16 PM
  #10  
ira
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Hi gg,

>I guess you haven't visited our fair borough in the last decade. <

You are correct.

I think that the last time I visited my birthplace was about 1980.

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Jun 4th, 2012, 12:27 PM
  #11  
ira
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Hey ek,

>When was Brooklyn ever associated with poor restaurant food?<

When did you ever think to hear the phrase "très Brooklyn" not meant in the same way as "vin de Californie"?

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Jun 4th, 2012, 12:53 PM
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You've not answered my question, Ira, but never mind. Surprised that you could be unaware of King's County's rising star, but I think I've heard rumors that people exist who are not clued into every nuance of the New York scene. Just so you know: In the food world, "Brooklyn" has almost become a code word for artisanal, small batch, local, ethically sourced, all things cool and hirsute, etc etc etc.

For example, in case you are interested:

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/27/di...pagewanted=all


http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/25/di...klyn.html?_r=1


http://nymag.com/news/features/artis...ooklyn-2012-4/

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/24/fa...the-hotel.html


But I digress..
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Jun 4th, 2012, 01:04 PM
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"I am getting really tired of those hype articles from the NYT. It has one of the most inaccurate travel sections in the world, at least as far as Paris is concerned."

Exactly, and not just their travel sections.
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Jun 4th, 2012, 01:32 PM
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kerouac,
It has one of the most inaccurate travel sections in the world

I look at the headline-grabbing articles in the NYT travel section more as travel eye candy than reportage. Those "36 hours in..." articles especially!

ira,
I think that the last time I visited my birthplace was about 1980.

Your departure and my arrival missed each other by a (very) few years. 1980 was circa my first visit to Paris.

Food trucks back then were strictly of the dirty-dawg / whopper pretzel variety.

You should come back and visit sometime! There's currently a thread on the US boards "what to eat in Manhattan". We'll create a "what to eat in Brooklyn" in your honor.

eks,
Ever since reading that article the other day, I have this crazy urge to get a room at the Wythe. Even though I'm not a hipster. And prefer the view from my home!

But I really digress!
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Jun 5th, 2012, 03:21 AM
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...ok, I never saw an American food truck in Paris, and to be honest, I doubt 'très Brooklyn' is actually a term people use...

I've noticed some English articles written on France just exaggerate crap beyond belief, so I'm slightly skeptical.
poireaux is offline  
Jun 5th, 2012, 03:29 AM
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what actually makes a taco, or anything else, "artisanal" anyway?
Dukey1 is offline  
Jun 5th, 2012, 05:16 AM
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I, an American, told my husband's Parisienne cousin I had never eaten in a Mcdonald's. She seemed astonished.

Club sandwiches seemed to be the latest thing when we were in Paris last year.
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Jun 5th, 2012, 06:52 AM
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"Just so you know: In the food world, "Brooklyn" has almost become a code word for artisanal, small batch, local, ethically sourced, all things cool and hirsute, etc etc etc."

Hirsute? The Brooklynites I know are very well groomed indeed and would be offended at your characterization...
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Jun 5th, 2012, 07:08 AM
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Bardo: I was being half facetious. And I did not mean "poorly groomed," by any means.

There are many Brooklynites who are not hipsters or Hasids. But eat at certain new and interesting restaurants and you might be forgiven for thinking that facial hair on men was a requirement of entry, both for servers and patrons.
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Jun 5th, 2012, 07:10 AM
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Ah, then bardo, you haven't met the "new" Brooklynite! Quite hirsute indeed - full beards are all the rage with the hip, locavore, artisanal set.
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