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The ever-lasting discussion of getting Euros - where and how

The ever-lasting discussion of getting Euros - where and how

May 21st, 2010, 10:12 AM
  #1  
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The ever-lasting discussion of getting Euros - where and how

Interesting article in Wash. Post, here is the link, what annoys me is that the author of it doesn't even know Euro is spelled with a capital E. Otherwise, interesting reading.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...305134_pf.html
Dayenu is offline  
May 21st, 2010, 10:24 AM
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No the mistake is not the lower case e...the mistake is that the plural of euro is.....euro...you don't say 100 euros, you're supposed to say 100 euro (although somewhere along the way after stating the plural of euro is euro, some document said it's okay in English to say euros).
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May 21st, 2010, 10:24 AM
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because euro, uncapitalized, is really used it seems more than Euro capitalized when perusing the European Union's official site - so perhaps the author is more in the know than you think.

would you capitalize Dollar in a sentence - like three Dollars - no
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May 21st, 2010, 10:36 AM
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Wikipedia has a whole article titled "Linguistic issues concerning the euro" which states--

"The European Commission Directorate-General for Translation's English Style Guide (A handbook for authors and translators in the European Commission) previously recommended the use of regular plurals for documents intended for the general public but now has no restriction on usage and states:

'Like ‘pound’, ‘dollar’ or any other currency name in English, the word ‘euro’ is written in lower case with no initial capital. Where appropriate, it takes the plural ‘s’ (as does ‘cent’): This book costs ten euros and fifty cents [. . .] The currency abbreviation precedes the amount and is followed by a hard space [. . .] The symbol also precedes the amount, and is followed by a hard space if the following number contains a space.'

Prior to 2006, the inter-institutional style guide recommended use of euro and cent without the plural s, and the translation style guide recommended use of invariant plurals (without s) when amending or referring to original legislation but use of regular plurals in documents intended for the general public."
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May 21st, 2010, 11:00 AM
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Question for Doh...Don't I often see when in France amounts written like this 11€50 (I could swear I have)?
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May 21st, 2010, 12:05 PM
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I don't care how they spelled the currency. It was a good article comparing apples to apples which sometimes is difficult for one to do.
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May 21st, 2010, 12:24 PM
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The irony here is the incredible number of grammatical mistakes in all of the replies. They are so bad I'm having trouble understanding what some of the posts are trying to convey. Haha!
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May 22nd, 2010, 06:20 AM
  #8  
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xyz, I'll try to check on that this summer, except usually I like to pretend the "e" is really a "$"
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May 22nd, 2010, 06:51 AM
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Euro or euro, how do you pronounce it? I've heard you-row and ee-row.
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May 22nd, 2010, 07:26 AM
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you-row
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May 22nd, 2010, 07:41 AM
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your-o
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May 22nd, 2010, 07:46 AM
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I thought this thread was going to be about how and where to get them, not how to spell them, whether to capitalize them, or what the plural is. (I know where/how to get them - but don't have any additional advice on spelling/grammar/linguistics.) ;-)
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May 22nd, 2010, 08:24 AM
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Americans pronounce it your-o, but in Spain/Italy it would be closer to ee-row. You can use Google translator (not totally accurate), select English to Italian, type in euro, click translate, click the speaker. Then switch to English/Spanish, translate, click the speaker. Next select English/English, translate, speaker.
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May 22nd, 2010, 10:19 AM
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The article has some things that could confuse people. For instance, the author used a card at an ATM in Vienna and was charged a three percent foreign transaction fee and a $1.50 fee for using an out of network bank. These fees are not inevitable with ATMs; there are banks issuing cards that do not charge them. And the author says that there might also be fees from the owner of the machine. But if you use an ATM affiliated with a European bank, there are no such fees.
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May 23rd, 2010, 07:33 AM
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"Spain/Italy it would be closer to ee-row." Thanks Kybourbon.

Spain is where I heard ee-row and was corrected there, but not in France.

It's a good article but I agree with Nikki. I wish the writer had been clearer about the ATM charges.
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