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Euro Currency Question. What are Cents called for the Euro?????

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Sep 18th, 2013, 07:18 AM
  #1
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Euro Currency Question. What are Cents called for the Euro?????

For the Dollar, we call them Cents (100 cents make a dollar). What do we call the change in Euros. (100 ????? makes a Euro)?
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Sep 18th, 2013, 07:19 AM
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Eurocents?
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Sep 18th, 2013, 07:22 AM
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I thought just 'cents'. Yes 100 makes a Euro...
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Sep 18th, 2013, 07:30 AM
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Aren't there 100 cents in a GB Pound as well?
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Sep 18th, 2013, 07:36 AM
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In English: cents, though more often nothing. "That'll be 2 euro thirty" is how the Irish (who mostly think the plural of euro is euro) usually describe things.

Some languages have a distinctive word: centimes in French, or centesimi in Italian. It might not be a straight translation of "hundredth": it's lepton (pl: lepta) in Greek

But usually the term's not used
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Sep 18th, 2013, 07:42 AM
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<>

Shrapnel.
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Sep 18th, 2013, 08:01 AM
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So what do you call the change in near-worthless US dollars?

Chaff?
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Sep 18th, 2013, 08:04 AM
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On the coins themselves, from .01 to .50, it says "Euro Cent." But I've never heard anyone say that. Here in Portugal they say "cêntimo."

As usual, Wikipedia has something to say on this topic
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linguis...rning_the_euro
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Sep 18th, 2013, 08:08 AM
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>>Aren't there 100 cents in a GB Pound as well?<<

not 'cents' - pennies i.e. Pence . . .
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Sep 18th, 2013, 08:17 AM
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I've heard them called centimes in France, using the old term when the currency was FF but it's not often that you find something to buy for less than E1 so the term is seldom used.

In the US, when you go to the store, how often does someone use the term "cents." I can't remember hearing anyone saying two dollars and thirty two cents. It's 2.32.
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Sep 18th, 2013, 08:19 AM
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Here in the Netherlands the coins are called centen. We don't have 1 & 2 cent coins though.
As far as prices go people would ask for, say, 2euro 50. No need to say cent. If it was less than a euro then they'd ask for 25cent.

We know they mean eurocents.
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Sep 18th, 2013, 08:23 AM
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Wow, that flanner is one grumpy, Yank-o-phobic dude.
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Sep 18th, 2013, 08:52 AM
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In France, cents (no one refers to them as Eurocents).
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Sep 18th, 2013, 09:01 AM
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Centimes in France, no cents !
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Sep 18th, 2013, 09:06 AM
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anyway you will unlikely see any Euro cents or centimes or whatever as like our pennies folks just seem to throw them away and unlike here prices are not always ending in a 9 - like 59 cents but would be 60 cents, etc.
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Sep 18th, 2013, 09:09 AM
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Wow, that flanner is one grumpy, Yank-o-phobic dude>

he/she/it takes after her/his/its flannerpooch2 - an English bulldog - bark is much worse than his/her/it bite but sure does like to bark.

Here Britain under Cameron is going down the tubes and he calls the U S buck near worthless - well that would all be relative - to some rich dude living in a estate in the Cotswold Hills with a gardener, etc he/she/it probably does think of our money as chaff. His/her/its money is probably not in pounds but Swiss francs, stashed in some Swiss bank.
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Sep 18th, 2013, 09:27 AM
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Symptoms are our friends.
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Sep 18th, 2013, 09:29 AM
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I think countries sometimes call them whatever cents were called in that country before, if they had something similar. In France, they are called centimes (I have never heard cents in France myself, but I would guess that's the only other possible alternative). Officially, it is a cent, of course. In Spain, they call them centimos. In Portugal, I think they use centavo.
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Sep 18th, 2013, 09:49 AM
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"In France, they are called centimes (I have never heard cents in France myself, but I would guess that's the only other possible alternative)".

It is not : "cents" would not be pronounced as in English. The final "s" being mute, it would be pronounced "cent" like "one hundred" and it would be very confusing.
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Sep 18th, 2013, 09:52 AM
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cent in Germany.
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