Suggested tip for hair stylist?

May 28th, 2014, 11:44 PM
  #1  
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Suggested tip for hair stylist?

The stylist owns the shop so do I leave no tip. It seems wrong. Thanks for any advice
MarySteveChicago is offline  
May 29th, 2014, 05:23 AM
  #2  
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Oh I should add, this is in Paris
MarySteveChicago is offline  
May 29th, 2014, 05:55 AM
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My hair dresser doesn't own the shop, but she doesn't get a tip. Doesn't seem wrong.
Not Paris, but a small town in the Netherlands.
Europeans don't tip all and sundry, whether they own the business or not.
hetismij2 is offline  
May 29th, 2014, 06:05 AM
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What is "wrong" about giving some extra money if you think the services rendered were worthwhile? Or is this one of those things involving what "everybody else does" regardless of how I was treated?
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May 29th, 2014, 07:31 AM
  #5  
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Let me be clear. I was saying it seems wrong to not leave a tip.

Thank you hetismij. I'll take your experience for consideration
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May 29th, 2014, 11:03 AM
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I think if it isn't the local custom, it just comes across as crass for Americans to be throwing money around a lot and giving money to people all the time for no reason. The problem is that it reflects the American culture that money is the most important thing and no one does their job just as a matter of industry or professional pride. It just looks crude. I think the services rendered in a regular store are worthwhile, also, but you don't tip the salesclerk in a store.
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May 29th, 2014, 11:09 AM
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No tip for the owner, unless something super special is done like an entirely new look.

Employees generally do get a tip in most salons. Men leave 1€, women leave 2€ except for the most basic shampoo + blow dry.
kerouac is online now  
May 29th, 2014, 11:54 AM
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Americans do NOT beleive money is the only thing. Most people in service industries do NOT earn very much - and the small size of their salaries is predicated on the assumption that they will be recieveing tips.

So while tipping in europe is often limited - in the US NOT tipping is a major faux pas - and in fact, cheating the service staff out of their livelihood.

For this reason many NYC cab drivers try not to pick up foreign visitors. They have learned they will often get a tiny - or even no - tip - despite the info cards handed out at airports - and the tip indicatior on the credit card payment device.
nytraveler is offline  
May 29th, 2014, 12:03 PM
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I tip well in the States because their pay sucks. I would not tip in Europe because they are paid a living wage.
flpab is offline  
May 29th, 2014, 12:30 PM
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I too tip in the States, as per US custom. In Europe I tip as per European custom.

Mary, if it makes you feel happier leave a small tip - round up the price of the haircut to a convenient amount. Your stylist will either politely refuse or accept and be happy. Either way you will know where you stand.
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May 29th, 2014, 12:30 PM
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A beauty service is intimate and personalized, thus making it a unique service that almost always qualifies for a gratuity. In NYC, 20% is the norm. If I'm treated well and love the service, I provide the same in any other high-fashion, internationally recognized salon.

It is rare that any stylist (employee) receives more than 50% of the salon price. On average, 60-75% of your bill goes to the owner's overhead. Chair rental salons are a different story. Self-employed freelancers and salon owners typically don't expect tips, but that doesn't stop loving customers from giving them.

In the beauty business, a cash gift is often associated with your appreciation for the artist's know-how and creativity on top of the level of personal service he or she provides (such as listening carefully to your personal wishes and desires, and respecting them). The gratuity for a great haircut and/or hair color service has little to do with any other service out there. When you're in the hands of a great beauty artist, no amount of money is enough.
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May 29th, 2014, 12:56 PM
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Do you know what minimum wage is in France, NYCFoodSnob? Of course special stylists earn much more than that -- and do not require tips.
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May 29th, 2014, 02:03 PM
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My stylist is the salon owner. I tip as I normally would for services (15-20%). I think the "don't tip the owner" is an out-of-date custom.

But this is in Seattle, I have no idea the custom in Paris.
suze is offline  
May 29th, 2014, 02:18 PM
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In the US, prices are set on the assumption that there will be a tip. In Europe, it is the opposite.
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May 29th, 2014, 02:32 PM
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Just call me frivolous but I tip my stylist 15-20% of the service cost. I live in a suburb of Houston and don't have a clue what is considered appropriate tip wise, but I'm tipping for service provided and feel it's appropriate. I also believe most people do tip.
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May 29th, 2014, 02:37 PM
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Why I hesitate to say what I do would be appropriate for Europe, is that I know for a fact tipping in bars and restaurants has entirely different customs there than in the USA.
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May 29th, 2014, 02:49 PM
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<< I also believe most people do tip.>>

You mean most Americans do. There is no reason to extrapolate what we do to what anyone else in the world does. And in Europe, tipping is not the norm.
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May 29th, 2014, 02:54 PM
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wunderbar2, we'll keep that in mind if we get our hair done in Houston. Regarding the customs of Paris, perhaps other people are better experts.
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May 29th, 2014, 03:34 PM
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"In the US, prices are set on the assumption that there will be a tip."

This is absolutely NOT TRUE in the beauty business, which makes your statement a falsehood.

"Do you know what minimum wage is in France"

Minimum wage has absolutely nothing to do with personalized service. If I want a scalp massage with my luxury spa shampoo, and the person who delivers the service transports me to the moon, my gratuity will bear no relationship to his/her salary.

"Special stylists" in Paris are no different than those in NYC and/or L.A., and there are plenty of Parisian "star" stylists who service chic, American women. Should the Parisian stylists with international clientele forgo the standard 20% (from cosmopolitan American customers), just because their local girls refuse to be that generous?

Tipping is never "required," even in American beauty salons. But tipping always seems to be appreciated no matter where I travel. Unfortunately, on threads like these, we never hear from those who are on the receiving end of tips. We seem to only hear from the cheap people who say the same thing over and over again.
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May 29th, 2014, 04:10 PM
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<< Unfortunately, on threads like these, we never hear from those who are on the receiving end of tips. >>

Many, many years ago I was a waitress for a while. I loved the people who gave generous tips as they were rewarding good service (going out of the way to do something special that they asked for). No one I worked with had a negative thought for those who tipped reasonably or generously. Regular customers would often tip above the 15%, which was standard at that time, as they knew how hard the work was and how little we were paid.

It was not a faux pas to tip 15% to 20%, or sometimes more, in the US.

I hated waiting on those people who were stingy with their tips as I worked just as hard for them as for the people who tipped normally.
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