Ryanair gets tough on hand baggage

Jan 21st, 2009, 02:21 AM
  #1  
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Ryanair gets tough on hand baggage


Tuesday, 20 January 2009 15:27

Ryanair says it will charge people who try to carry more than one piece of cabin baggage aboard its flights.

The airline allows passengers to carry one piece of hand baggage weighing up to 10kg, but it claims there has been a big increase in the number of passengers 'abusing' this allowance. Ryanair says one passenger tried to carry five items of hand baggage onboard one aircraft.

From now on, Ryanair passengers who turn up with more than one piece of hand baggage will be charged €30 at the departure gate.



Lawchick is offline  
Jan 21st, 2009, 02:28 AM
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Good,I wish more airlines would take a much stricter attitude to this .I am fed up having to stuff my relively small amount of hand luggage into inreasingly less space because so many folk insist of having carry ons as well as hand luggage as well as numerous other items.
unclegus is offline  
Jan 21st, 2009, 02:29 AM
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Ryanair also charge per piece of hold lugage. We now wrap all our bags in a plastic sheet and then wrap rope around them all leaving a very easy carry handle.

It looks odd but if you are charged by numbers then you act on numbers
bilboburgler is offline  
Jan 21st, 2009, 03:07 AM
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"charged €30 at the departure gate"
This is going to make the Duty free shop owners annoyed.
willit is offline  
Jan 21st, 2009, 03:47 AM
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I am not sure that purchases from Duty free shops count towards hand luggage.
They may do on Ryanair but most normal airlines allow them as extra. Which is why it pays to hang on to your bags from the duty free shops. The airline never checks what's in them.
hetismij is offline  
Jan 21st, 2009, 04:35 AM
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This is why I copied the piece about "Departure gate" - it seems to suggest that this will be the criteria, and not check in, or security.
willit is offline  
Jan 21st, 2009, 08:18 AM
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"This is why I copied the piece about "Departure gate" - it seems to suggest that this will be the criteria, and not check in, or security".

It definitely IS the criteria since many people check on line and bypass the regular check-in counters. I flew last Saturday from Madrid to Girona with Ryanair and they were very strict about the number and size of hand luggage. The checks took place at departure gate and several people had to pay an extra €30 on the spot.
Duty free purchases must be packed in your hand luggage.
Not that it affects duty free shops a lot as most people flying with Ryanair are Europeans and not entitled to duty free purchases.
Pvoyageuse is offline  
Jan 21st, 2009, 08:43 AM
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It does affect EU travelers as well since it is not everywhere the case that you can only shop at duty free/ Travel Value stores when going to a non-EU destination.

You cannot buy "duty free" for a domestic flight within Spain, but you can for any international flight, including any EU destination.

If you had been going from Girona to Dublin, you would have thought that Ryanair was the official carrier for all kinds of spirits.
Cowboy1968 is offline  
Jan 21st, 2009, 09:22 AM
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Cowboy1968 wrote: "You cannot buy "duty free" for a domestic flight within Spain, but you can for any international flight, including any EU destination."

If that is so, the Spanish duty-free shops are breaking the law. For travel between EU member-states, you can buy stuff airside, but not at duty-free prices. There can be big differences between duty-paid prices in different countries, and it is often worthwhile buying them.
Padraig is offline  
Jan 21st, 2009, 10:50 AM
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You cannot buy "duty free" for a domestic flight within Spain, but you can for any international flight, including any EU destination.

You cannot buy "duty free" when you are travelling to another country within the EU.
Pvoyageuse is offline  
Jan 21st, 2009, 10:51 AM
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I should have added: if you are a citizen of the EU.
Pvoyageuse is offline  
Jan 21st, 2009, 10:53 AM
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Good for them. There's no point in having a limit if you don't enforce it. Boarding goes a lot faster if you don't have a bunch of people trying to fit too many bags into too little space. Of course, I travel with one checked bag and one small (fits under the seat in front) carry on, so it wouldn't change my habits.
thursdaysd is offline  
Jan 21st, 2009, 11:14 AM
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Sorry, pvoyageuse,

I don't want to obsess about this, but also a citizen of the EU can buy liquor or wine (cigarettes are often excluded, but not in Spain) AFTER security on his intra-EU flight from Madrid to Munich, Dublin, or Paris.

Since there is no "duty free" among the EU customs union's members, it is more or less a loophole that helped airport shops survive after the customs union came into effect.

What airport shops do is to re-imburse you for the tax, not duties, out of their own pocket if you travel within the EU customs union boundaries.
So, tax gets paid, just not by you but by the shop. Thus, Spanish (or other) "duty free" shops don't break the law.
That's why they always want to see the boarding pass or ask for your destination.
The price for the customer stays the same, regardless of his destination or nationality.
Cowboy1968 is offline  
Feb 5th, 2009, 07:15 AM
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Our reporter tries to avoid the Ryanair €30 carry-on fine

By Aoife Anderson
Wednesday February 04 2009

AIRPORT bargains could soon be a thing of the past for Ryanair passengers with strict new on-board baggage regulations forcing flyers to pay yet another new surcharge.

Duty-free or airport shopping bags that fail to fit into a permitted single piece of hand luggage are set to push up the costs of travelling with the budget carrier.

The Herald put the latest of the low-cost airline's rules to the test and came up with poor results, proving it has become almost impossible to avoid exorbitant extra charges when flying with Ryanair.

This follows an announcement by Ryanair that they will impose a €30 fee on passengers with more than one item of on-board luggage. The surcharge will apply to duty-free shopping, meaning any additional purchases bought in the short time before boarding must also fit into a passenger's single bag.

However, abiding by the new regulations will prove to be quite a challenge. We attempted to pack just a few popular duty-free purchases, including two bottles of alcohol, into a modest-sized bag for a weekend away.

But added to two changes of clothing, a few basic toiletries along with a pair of shoes, hairdryer, laptop and handbag, fitting the duty-free items into the restricted sized luggage permitted onboard required serious effort.

Not only a tight squeeze, it was not possible to even close the bag let alone do up the zip. So avoiding the hefty new surcharge will be next to impossible after just a few small airport purchases.

Additional

Ryanair's baggage policy states: "Handbag, briefcase, laptops etc must be carried within your permitted 1 piece of cabin baggage".

And even if you do manage to cram any newly purchased duty-free items into your humble baggage, there is also the additional weight to consider. Ryanair's onboard baggage rules state: "It should weigh no more than 10kg and not exceed the maximum dimensions of 55x40x20cm."

The latest restriction has left some wondering whether this means Ryanair staff will be reweighing all cabin baggage while boarding the plane to ensure passengers are within the limits. The policy states that in any cases where passengers refuse to pay the surcharge, they will not board.

The budget carrier's strict policy of allowing just one item of cabin luggage has long included briefcases, laptops and handbags. But the airline has now specifically stated duty-free shopping will be included in the restrictions.

The company has claimed a growing number of customers were attempting to board with more than one bag.

However, it seems none of Ryanair's rivals are facing the same equality issues when it comes to baggage. While Aer Lingus also permits just one cabin bag, which must weigh fewer than 6kgs, the firm's website states that: "additional small items such as cameras, personal stereos, overcoats or handbags may be carried".

It is believed airport and duty-free items will continue to be included under this.

The maximum dimensions for an Aer Lingus cabin bag are also larger than for Ryanair. Aer Arann allows passengers one cabin bag and one checked bag. British Airways passengers can take one bag and either a laptop bag, handbag or briefcase.

[email protected]

- Aoife Anderson
Lawchick is offline  
Feb 5th, 2009, 07:59 AM
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I'm beginning to think the low price doesn't outweigh the hassle involved with flying Ryanair.
hetismij is offline  
Feb 5th, 2009, 08:23 AM
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My one and only experience flying Ryanair was out of Bremen, Germany (to London). The one bag/10 kg limit was certainly being enforced at check-in (and I actually managed to do carry-on only, despite being on a two week trip that was mostly business) and the one bag only policy was very definitely being enforced at boarding. An English passenger who'd bought several bottles of liquor after security was asked by the gate agent to put them into his carry-on. After much whinging and fussing with his bag and looking to his fellow passengers for sympathy (none forthcoming, I'm afraid) he did actually manage to do it and boarding proceeded without incident. His bag was not re-weighed, and had it been would likely have been overweight (as liquids are very, very heavy---1 liter of water or similar density liquid weighs 1 kg).

Like unclegus, I'm delighted to see airlines enforcing their carry-on policies. I do, and it does irk me to see others who don't.
Therese is offline  
Oct 2nd, 2010, 04:31 AM
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Good for Ryanair.
zippo is offline  

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