Neuschwanstein Castle

Apr 18th, 2007, 07:07 PM
  #1  
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Neuschwanstein Castle

I will be in Frankfurt Germany next week for business. I have one free day April 29th...I would like to visit Neuschwanstein castle. I know its far from Frankfurt. Can anyone recommend a tour company that does tours to there from Frankfurt. Approximat cost?
aa777flyer is offline  
Apr 18th, 2007, 07:28 PM
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Because of the distance, I doubt any tour company offers a one-day tour to Neuschwanstein from Frankfurt. There are many nice places to visit within an hour or so of Frankfurt.
JoeE is offline  
Apr 18th, 2007, 08:41 PM
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You could see Burg Eltz castle on a daytrip from Frankfurt - a real knights castle, over 800 years old. It's near Moselkern west of Koblenz: www.burg-eltz.de

N'stein is visually spectacular from the outside but not especially worth touring in comparison, IMO. It's barely a century old and not all that historically significant. If you're interested in the particular history of King Ludwig, then maybe, if you were going to stay there and tour the other Ludwig castles, it would be worth the trouble. (Buy a poster and say you went there??)
Russ is offline  
Apr 18th, 2007, 10:45 PM
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Absolutely, second Russ on his opinion and advice.
Sassafrass is offline  
Apr 19th, 2007, 03:43 AM
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Actually Neuschwanstein is much more historically significant than Burg Eltz. Just because something has been around a long time does not necessarily make it historically significant, and vice versa.

I also disagree about visiting the interior of Neuschwanstein--while only about 15 rooms were completed, they are truly unique in conception (given Ludwig's fascination with Germanic mythology and Richard Wagner's interpretation thereof). Burg Eltz has a lot of stuff to see and it is worth seeing, but it's pretty much like hundreds of other castles inside.

However, I agree that Neuschwanstein is too far from Frankfurt, and Burg Eltz is a magnificent castle.
Jake1 is offline  
Apr 19th, 2007, 04:49 AM
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Consider a Rhine River trip. Rudesheim to Boppard. Or along the Mosel. See Koblenz. This site has some pictures of the castle. http://www.pbase.com/bmcmorrow/mosel
norrisken is offline  
Apr 19th, 2007, 04:56 AM
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Ditto on Russ's recommendation. Burg Eltz is the "real deal" and in a wonderful state of preservation. It is about an hour and a half from Frankfurt. Although the setting is not as spectacular as that of Neuschwanstein, it is beautiful nontheless.
basingstoke2 is offline  
Apr 19th, 2007, 04:57 AM
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Hi aa,

If you take the 06:50 train, you will be in Fuessen by noon.

You could see the castles, have dinner and take the 22:22 back - arrv at 07:00, but you will not get any sleep.

Plan to skip dinner and take the 19:05 back.

See www.bahn.de.

ira is offline  
Apr 19th, 2007, 09:17 AM
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Rent a car. Drive up the Rhine. See Kloster Eberbach in Eltville, the Marksburg near Braubach, Burg Eltz near Mayen and spend the evening in one of the small old villages along the Rhine.

Then you will get a real idea of medieval history.

The train tour to Neuschwanstein will be a torture, spending all day on the train. But IF you want to do it then have lunch and dinner on the train - German trains have good restaurant cars.
traveller1959 is offline  
Apr 19th, 2007, 10:35 AM
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Skip Neuschwanstein.

To me, it is (after many trips to Germany) possibly the most disappointing site in the country.

NanBug is offline  
Apr 19th, 2007, 11:07 AM
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NanBug--just curious as to why you found Neuschwanstein so disappointing. Given its fascinating historical context and its certainly unique and sometimes bizarre architectural and decorative touches, we thought it one of the most interesting sights in Germany.
Jake1 is offline  
Apr 19th, 2007, 11:17 AM
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Many people find it disappointing when they find out that it's only 100 yers old - not 1,000.

And while Mad Ludwig was certainly an intresting historical figure - if you're looking for a place that was built when knighthood was in flower, with tournaments and sieges with war engines and boiling oil common - it just doesn;t cut it.
nytraveler is offline  
Apr 19th, 2007, 11:22 AM
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Well, anyone who goes there thinking that's what they're going to see sure hasn't done any homework. I think what makes it so fascinating is the entire "mad Ludwig" story and a man so obsessed with so many things that he built that giant place (monstrosity, if you want to call it that) in the late 1800's. The fact that it was designed by a theatre set designer rather than an architect speaks volumes about the fascination I have with the place.
NeoPatrick is online now  
Apr 19th, 2007, 12:07 PM
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Hi, Jake.

It was probably because, as a child, I had imagined it as the quintessential castle -- with the obligatory dungeon and moat. I studied German, dreamed about going to Germany, and hung a poster of it on my bedroom wall(still have the poster!).

I never realized waaaaay back (as a child) then that it wasn't an authentic medieval castle till my first trip to Germany as a teen happened and I compared it to other "real" medieval castles and ruins that I saw during that first trip. To me, there was no comparison.

I guess the years of built-up anticipation set me up for a giant disappointment when I actually got to set foot in the place nearly 30 years ago.

Although I appreciate it for what it is -- a fantastic 19th-century architectural folly in a spectacular setting (which is very interesting in its own right), my archetypal castle is a medieval one, like Burg Eltz.

Although Neuschwanstein would be great to see if one is in the area, I wouldn't spend a whole day traveling from Frankfurt to see it. So that's why I said what I said.

But that's just my humble little opinion.

Who knows, maybe the original poster has had a poster of the castle on his bedroom wall for years, too?

Never know....






NanBug is offline  
Apr 19th, 2007, 12:15 PM
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I think Neuschwanstein is great, but too far from Frankfurt for a day trip. There are lots and lots of great places closer to where you will be.
J_Correa is offline  
Apr 23rd, 2007, 05:55 AM
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Makes sense to me, nanbug. Sometimes our expectations and hopes can cause big disappointments.
Jake1 is offline  
Apr 23rd, 2007, 06:17 AM
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Nanbug, I think that you have gotten to the core of the question. Neuschwanstein needs to be looked at in the context of what it is, not what one thought it would be. In that context, Jake1 is spot on. It has a fascination and historical signficance in its own right.
basingstoke2 is offline  
Apr 23rd, 2007, 07:42 AM
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I too was disappointed with Neuschwanstein, but Burg Eltz is marvelous.
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mikemo is offline  
Apr 23rd, 2007, 10:55 AM
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NanBug,

I know how you must feel. When I was 8 years old I fell in love with the pyramids in Egypt. Read everything about them and watched every show on TV. In 1978 I visited them. What a disappointment! My imagination of what I thought I would see was so very far off. I couldn't believe that they weren't way out in the middle of a desert. There's a golf course next to them! And the inside of the one I went into smelled like a 3000 year old bathroom. Will I go back? heck yes, but with a real world view. Oh and I did get to ride a camel.
norrisken is offline  
Apr 24th, 2007, 10:28 AM
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As far as historical ownership goes, I suppose that I do not find much to choose between the robber barons ("knighthood was in flower") of the Rhein & Mosel vs. a king that bankrupted his kingdom to build fancy residences. That said for the past, both the Rhein/Mosel and Neuschwanstein are in quite beautiful settings and modern Germany's preservation of both is to be commended.

Regards, Gary
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