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I want to move to Europe in my future, how can I do this?

I want to move to Europe in my future, how can I do this?

May 6th, 2014, 02:41 PM
  #1  
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Join Date: May 2014
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I want to move to Europe in my future, how can I do this?

Hi, I am a 14 year old Grade 9 student living in Ontario, Canada and I really want to move to Europe when I grow up. My parents are from European descent (German/Austrian) and I have been to places such as Iceland, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, France, England, Serbia, and Romania. I really love Europe and I am going back this summer to stay with my aunt for a few weeks in Austria. I do not know if this site was the best place to get advice but I may as well try somewhere.

Anyways, in my future I really want to live in Europe and my parents tell me Europe has different immigration laws than Canada and I was wondering, what can I do that can increase my chances of living in Europe? (Living in Englad or Germany/Austria)
DeutschAlex is offline  
May 6th, 2014, 03:45 PM
  #2  
 
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If any of your ancestors (parents, grandparents etc.) were victims of Nazi discrimination, you can apply for and obtain German citizenship. Look at this website, which is targeted to US audiences but I'm certain it would apply to Canadians as well. http://www.germany.info/Vertretung/u..._Restored.html We have a nephew who did this and is now living in Germany. Others in our family are working on it.

Each country has its own residency qualifications. Usually the most difficult thing is obtaining permission to work. However you could certainly attend university or do postgraduate studies in Europe, which might help you to establish residency for the purposes of staying longer.

You'll probably have to wait until you're 18 or older before any real process can start. In the meantime, do your homework, and good luck!
Gardyloo is online now  
May 6th, 2014, 03:46 PM
  #3  
 
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Look into student exchange programs while you are in high school and college. See if you can get placements in the countries that most interest you.

To live permanently the easiest way would be if you were hired by a Canadian or US company then transferred there on the job.
suze is offline  
May 6th, 2014, 05:37 PM
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You could marry a European.

Why not ask your aunt how she is eligible to live in Austria.
adrienne is offline  
May 6th, 2014, 08:51 PM
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YOu sound very mature for 14. As positive as you sound I don't doubt that you will acomplish this. Good luck to you. i love Europe also
BeniciaChris is offline  
May 7th, 2014, 01:32 PM
  #6  
 
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If you want to live in Germany or Austria, the number one thing to improve your chances is learning German.

You can attend university or get a job speaking only English but you have way more options if you speak German.
Hans is offline  
May 7th, 2014, 01:48 PM
  #7  
 
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That's an excellent suggestion from Hans, and one you can start right now. To become fluent in at least one other language.
suze is offline  
May 7th, 2014, 02:09 PM
  #8  
 
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Other than being a victim of the Nazis, most countries only give citizenship if one of your parents is a citizen. A few allow ancestry going back two or three generations, such as Ireland and Italy but there is strict evidential requirement and a backlog of 1-2 years. There are a handful of working holiday programmes with certain countries where you can live and work (and have a holiday) for one year. UK have a similar programme called Tier 5 youth mobility scheme, valid 2 years. If you study at a French university and graduate, you can get a work visa that can lead to citizenship. Less generous scheme exists for UK.
You are still young and the rules change, so as others have suggested, enjoy your studies, get good marks in exams, learn a language or two and keep your eyes peeled on developments.
Alec is offline  
May 7th, 2014, 03:01 PM
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You should attend university in Germany. It's not hard to get a student visa and once you are there, you are 'in the system' and will not find it hard to find employment and thus get a visa through your employer. But I agree with other people that the way to start is to learn German. That's going to be a big part of what you do.

Approach your nearest German consulate about information on studying in Germany. They will be more than happy to point you in the right direction.

Lavandula
lavandula is offline  
May 7th, 2014, 04:47 PM
  #10  
 
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It's correct that your best chance is to join a US or Canadian company that has a large presence overseas and get a transfer. (Getting a job with a europe-based company will be very difficult.)

In preparation get a year or semester in europe in high school and spend a year there in college (traveling around and living for a year can give you a much better idea if this is really what you want to do).

Investigate what types of multi-nationals have the most of this type of transfer job and pick a college major that will get you a job there. Also - in high school and college become fluent in one or preferably two european languages (this is standard for students in many european schools) that will make you a better candidate for transfer to europe. But don;t expect it to happen until you have been in the job at least several years - they don;t send the interns or juniors.
nytraveler is offline  
May 8th, 2014, 10:26 AM
  #11  
 
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Hoping you are still reading. I think everyone's given excellent advice here.
1. Learn a second language
2. Learn a third language
3. Apply for a semester of study abroad in high school
4. Attend some or all of your college in Europe
suze is offline  

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