How large is a large room?

Old Feb 23rd, 2005, 07:07 AM
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How large is a large room?

Hi Guys,

My husband and I are going to Paris and Venice and the rooms we're booked into are 16sq m (in Venice) and 15 sq m(in Paris)excluding the bathroom and balcony in both cases. Is this large by Europe standards? I'm just trying to get a feel for what one can expect...

Thanks so much,
-Dee
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Old Feb 23rd, 2005, 07:13 AM
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ira
 
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Hi dee,

Multiply by ten to get sq. ft. Measure your bedroom.
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Old Feb 23rd, 2005, 07:16 AM
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This is TINY by any standard. This may help you: a typical US-style "motel" room with two double beds is about 28 square meters, including the bathroom. You are talking about a room of about half that size. That is very small. While hotel rooms in Europe tend to be on the small side, IMO 15 and 16 sq meters for two people is really tight, esp if you are there for more than one night and/or have a number of bags.
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Old Feb 23rd, 2005, 07:48 AM
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Ira's general "rule" about multiplying by 10 is a good one; 16 sq. meters is a little more than 172 square feet (remember a 12X12' room is 144 sq feet).

Is this large??? No, and there are PLENTY of European hotel rooms which are larger than this. A lot of these "small" rooms you've been hearing about are not necessarily in the best grade hotels although even the biggies can sometimes have tiny rooms.

I think the MORE important question you should ask yourself is whether or not YOU can live with it or you think it is worth it, whether by European, or any other so-called "standards" it is lareg or small.
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Old Feb 23rd, 2005, 09:23 AM
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Check this out - go to these Parisby photo galleries. One hotel has the pictures labeled (standard, superior, etc), the other one can be judged by the extra table, armchairs, etc as being the larger...

Hotel Duret
http://www.parisby.com/duret/pages/gallery.htm

Standard room - double bed - Room size 14 sq meters
Superior room - queen bed or 2 twins - Room size 25 sq meters


Best Western Belloy Saint Germain
http://www.parisby.com/belloysaintge...es/gallery.htm

Dbl/Twin Standard - with one double bed or twin beds -
Room size: approximately 11 square metres
Deluxe - with queen size bed or twin beds
Room size: 20 - 30 square metres
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Old Feb 23rd, 2005, 09:41 AM
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Thanks guys.

Guess I'll just stick with the rooms we have. It's too much of a pain to hunt again. Also, I'm not sure if we can afford much more than 160 euros at this point. The hotels that I found these rooms are Du Quai Voltaire in Paris and Hotel Mercurio in Venice. I had a lot of trouble finding a reasonably priced hotel in Venice..!


-Dee
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Old Feb 23rd, 2005, 09:50 AM
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the easy conversion rule I use is to multiply meters by 10 and then round up a little.

I think 15m2 is pretty small in Paris for two people to stay in. However, that isn't unusual for cheaper hotels. You should get rooms more around 20-25 m2 in more expensive hotels. To visualize 15m2, that would be a 3-5m room, which is about 10x16 feet.
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Old Feb 23rd, 2005, 09:56 AM
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I am estimating, but the room I use at the Astoria in Munich is moderate size even by American standards. By European standards it is large.
Not counting the bathroom, I estimate it to be 13 feet by 15 feet which is about
3.8 meters by 5 meters or slightly less than 20 square meters or about 200 square feet. There is a balcony, too.
the wardrobe for clothes does use up some of the space as does the desk.

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Old Feb 23rd, 2005, 10:12 AM
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My travel mate says the room is more like 15 x 18 feet, so that is slightly larger than my estimate. She is more astute on those matters than I. So I think her estimate is better. So 25 meters square is a closer estimate.

I know I have never felt cramped in that room.

Lets put it this way. We can easily do our back exercises without banging into the walls or the furniture. That rarely happens in a Eurpean hotel room.

In Paris the room was so small, that if one was moving about, the other had to retreat to the bed to avoid constant collisions.
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Old Feb 23rd, 2005, 10:19 AM
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square footage (or metres) are very important, but there are some additional factors like size of bed(s), other furniture in the room (built-ins or free standing), closets,whether or not there are radiators jutting out or niches jutting in. "Largeness" of an empty room may not be the same in appearance or usage as a furnished one.
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