EU airline compensation regulations ....

Feb 6th, 2006, 12:45 AM
  #1  
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EU airline compensation regulations ....

Maybe useful .......................................

I had a flight delay of 6 hours this weekend. It gave me time to study the compensation rules for airlines operating within EU. These rules became operative in February 2005.

Having obtained the information , which the airline refused to supply, I discovered that the airline had breached many of the regulations, and only refusal to board the aircraft by a dedicated few passengers produced the documentation required under the compensation law.

Passenger notification :

Check in counters should have a poster stating :

"If you are denied boarding of if your flight is cancelled or delayed for at least two hours, ask at the check-in counter or boarding gate for the text stating your rights, particularly with regard to compensation and assistance."

EU flight compensation rules :

Cancellation, or refused flight due to overbooking

Flight length :

under 1,500 km - delay over 2 hours, Compensation = Euros 250.

1,500 to 3,500 km - delay 2 to 3 hours, Compensation = Euros 200 & if delay over 3 hours, Compensation = Euros 400

3,500+ km Delay over 4 hours, Compensation = Euros 600

n.b. Passenger must check in within stated times.

Delayed flights:

Flight length :

Up to 1,500 km - delay over 2 hours, Compensation = provision of meals and refreshments and two free telephone calls, e-mails or faxes. Delay over 5 hours Compensation = refund of ticket and a free return flight to the point of origin should the flight no longer serve any purpose. Otherwise the airlines are required to reroute passengers to their final destination. Meals, refreshments, lodging, phone and email are required at airline's expense.

1,500 to 3,500 km - delay over 3 hours, and for all longer flights delayed over 4 hours, Compensation = meals and refreshments and two free telephone calls, e-mails or faxes. Delay over 5 hours, Compensation = refund of ticket and a free return flight to the point of origin should the flight no longer serve any purpose. Otherwise the airlines are required to reroute passengers to their final destination. Meals, refreshments, lodging, phone and email are required at airline's expense.

mpprh is offline  
Feb 6th, 2006, 12:56 AM
  #2  
 
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The airlines are dragging their heels by all accounts:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/airlines/s...701668,00.html

Threaten them with publicity.

But what rules apply if a booking is made from outside the EU?
PatrickLondon is offline  
Feb 6th, 2006, 02:15 AM
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"threaten them with publicity..."

I agree and the FIRST place to do that is right here...

so, MPPRH, which airline was it??????
Intrepid1 is offline  
Feb 6th, 2006, 03:27 AM
  #4  
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Cyprus Airways
mpprh is offline  
Feb 6th, 2006, 03:40 AM
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Interesting. When I first read about these compensation guidelines, I wondererd if the airlines would wait to be taken to court to pay them in many instances. What have they to lose? Especially since, as far as I'm aware, a small claims court judgement applies only to the specific case, and can't be enforced as a universal court order.

This is a cumbersome, overly centralized way of treating the problem of delays, not to mention one that treats airlines differently from other modes of transportation, such as bus lines or rail lines. A real bureaucrats' dream.

Consumers would be better served by the airlines being obliged to publish, on a very frequent basis, what the average delay of a flight was (expressed both in absolute terms and as a percentage of flight times) so as to assist competitors in doing a better job of serving that route, and consumers in seeking the most efficient airline possible. Assuming that's what the consumer values most - and given that people are already willing to travel to out of the way airports to take discount airlines, I'm not sure many consumers will be willing to pay the higher fares that will result if these compensation schemes are strictly enforced.

But what do others think? Is there something I've overlooked?
Sue_xx_yy is offline  

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