Selfishness,Arrogance and a GUN!

Old Aug 3rd, 2008, 04:54 AM
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Selfishness,Arrogance and a GUN!

Sorry people but I had to post this.Not sure why anyone would spend this crazy money to do this. Rather then maybe getting a cool car.But on the other hand-I guess that wont help out the REAL problem these guys are compensating for.
Thanks, David
http://allafrica.com/stories/200807310681.html
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Old Aug 3rd, 2008, 06:28 AM
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This is almost unbelievable, last year it was permits to shoot Rhino now this.
Who are the people who are willing to pay this sort of money I wonder?
Why would anyone want to boast about shooting one of these extremely rare animals, humans don't you just love 'em.
 
Old Aug 3rd, 2008, 06:53 AM
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This is very, very dishearting - I just saw a one-hour show on Animal Planet about these elephants. Their lives are tough enough without having to contend with this macho hunters.

Don't know how these people can sleep at night knowing that they have just eliminated possible future generations of these magnificent creatures.
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Old Aug 3rd, 2008, 07:05 AM
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Disgraceful. Both the hunters and the actions of the Ministry of Environment and Tourism. I can't imagine why anyone would get a thrill from killing such an animal, and like Sniktawk don't understand how anyone can boast of such behavior. But, emotional issues aside, allowing hunting of these precious creatures doesn't even make economic sense in the long run. I realize $60,000 USD is quite a bit of money for one permit, but with the three permits that is only $180,000. I fear Namibia could lose much more in safari/tourist dollars if the desert elephant population is decreased or worse yet, eliminated all together.
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Old Aug 3rd, 2008, 07:21 AM
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"I think the Ministry officials who approved these quotas are not thinking in terms of the best conservation measures for the keystone species in the Kunene Region, but are succumbing to pressure from conservancies to earn quick bucks," Dr Fox wrote.

Ya think?

As for the hunter, what does with one do with such a prize? And who do they show it to? Who is the audience? Obviously this would not be done for educational purposes? I am curious to what the conversation would entail in such a circumstance between hunter and mystery audience? Must have a dungeon full of human torture victims and really just talks to himself. Of course if could be a female hunter.

I live on a road that I share with a very wealthy persons *trophy room* that has turned into a fine Natural History Museum but it has been in the works for quite a while now. I do not see this trophy going to such a place.

I would think today that one could find more folks willing to pay say, 65,000 USD for their child to have an *adopt a pet* to show off and have little birthday party safaris to go and show off their fancy pet!

Some of these decision makers are not very creative and are not networking in the right circles, they could have the *adopt a pet* expire annually so some other child could pay even more the next year for said privilege etc. You can only kill the animal once butÖ

*scratching my head, crying again and adding this to my of list of matters I feel help and hopeless about*

I shall try to rally and do something proactive tho I am very tired,

Den
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Old Aug 3rd, 2008, 08:32 AM
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Disgusting and unbelievable.

I remember that in the past some people were doing their best here to let us believe that hunting was helping conservation a lot ...

Well, like in many cases I don't see how hunting is helping here.

People who shoot such a precious animal are just brainless ... and probably need a gun to prove they are real men.

I can only say that Namibia is going the wrong way if they are giving permits to shoot elephants and rhinos.

I found the following website:

http://www.namibianhuntingsafaris.co...ing_safari.htm

Have a look at it (you see that you can hunt cheetah - some of the references seems also remarkable).


 
Old Aug 3rd, 2008, 08:45 AM
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Tragically poor decision that may well cause an irreversible collapse of the remaining population. According to the article the local communities only receive N$60,000 which is only $8,333 per elephant at today's exchange rate, while hunting operators receive the bulk of the money. For a figure that quite a few people actually spend on a single safari they are going to sell off the life of an elephant for a short term windfall of only about $25,000 and possibly destroy their future tourism forever.

It's actions like this that make reasonable people despise the hunting safari industry. The one attempt at a redeeming argument that you always get from hunters is what great conservationists they are. There is a history of many examples of successful conservation to point to and it's become accepted by most scientists that properly managed hunting can be a valuable conservation tool. But when you see examples like this where hunting operators push for obviously unsustainable quotas it just solidifies the opinions that they cannot be trusted and they are only conservationists by default when managed properly by regulators. In this case the regulators have completely failed.

Removing potentially 60% of the breeding population should never be considered. When the population is miniscule and already suffering from in-breeding the last thing you want to do is reduce the gene pool further. The desert adaption is unique to these specific elephants who have learned to tread very lightly in their environment, observing them delicately plucking twigs is quite a contrast to those ripping branches off of trees in other areas. Because of this it will be dangerous if in the future new elephants are introduced -- if they don't learn quickly about this new landscape the could absolutely ruin the environment and that would be another route to extirpation of the desert adapted elephant.
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Old Aug 3rd, 2008, 08:48 AM
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<Insert your personal favourite expletive here>

On our first trip to Namibia in 2001 we were very fortunate to see 17 individual desert elephants. This at a time when local conservationists estimated a total population of just 200 across a fairly large area. We felt hugely priviledged to witness these animals that had successfully survived in such a harsh environment. We also felt a great deal of hope on learning that they were actively protected and that their population was forecast to grow (which it has).

This is just. Shocking.
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Old Aug 3rd, 2008, 09:05 AM
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Outrageous and heartbreaking.
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Old Aug 3rd, 2008, 09:13 AM
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In order to register your opposition to this, one could always send an appropriately worded response to the Namibian Ministry of Environment and Tourism, the contacts page of which can be seen here:

www.met.gov.na/contactus.htm
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Old Aug 3rd, 2008, 10:15 AM
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Thanks Matt, have done.
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Old Aug 3rd, 2008, 11:46 AM
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Iím speechless.

Tuskerdave, even though you bring bad news, itís nice to see you back. Where have you been?
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Old Aug 3rd, 2008, 11:59 AM
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Thanks Matt-also have done!
I have stopped in from time to time on here. Not all that much to say. Much has gone on in my life these last couple of yrs- mostly personal.Much of that not so good. But I am doing very ok now-thanks
D
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Old Aug 3rd, 2008, 12:03 PM
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This is one of the two addresses i sent a mail too-it failed and bounced back ([email protected])
could someone post the addresses that were used and worked?
Thanks, David
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Old Aug 3rd, 2008, 12:45 PM
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NAMBIA - the worst african nation when it comes to trophy hunting!

would never return to that destination!

it's a shame!

div
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Old Aug 3rd, 2008, 12:47 PM
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thx matt for the link!

despite the namibian government is simply resistant to any petition and ignoring ANY outcry i of course will sign.

div
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Old Aug 3rd, 2008, 12:52 PM
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@ matt
it's not a petion as i found ouzt - but send an email.

skimmer
i mad that cristal clear here a long time ago that namibia allows cheetah hunting without permission or restrictions!

ANYBODY who has got cheetahs on their land can hunt that cat down. the average pricetag for a cheetah is 1200€!

based on the vital fact that 90% of the namibian surface is farmer's land and taken into consideration that the estimated 5000 cheetahs in namibia live mostly on these 90% of land you can imagine yourselves how quick their number decrease!

there is no license in nambia for cheetah hunting! they just put it on the menue for these hunting indiots and kill them.
no body cares obviously!

div
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Old Aug 3rd, 2008, 12:54 PM
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I am so pleased to see the reaction to ths. It shows that in spite of some of our silliness inn the past we are all together in condemning this madness!
 
Old Aug 3rd, 2008, 01:03 PM
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from this link posted: www.met.gov.na/contactus.htm I sent email to every address. so far only the last one bounced back.
Thanks, David
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Old Aug 3rd, 2008, 01:40 PM
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OK so Namibia is according to some "the worst for trophy hunting", most of the hunters come from 2 countries USA and Germany, surprise surprise.

It is not the country allowing the hunting that is to blame it is the country that breeds the hunters!

They are the sick people!

If idiots wish to pay this sort of money and you are poor what would you do?

Get your government to ban these people from doing this! Do not blame the poor people from taking the money!

WE ARE ALL GUILTY!

Stand up and be counted!!!!!!
 

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