New Brunswick

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Stunning scenery, vast forests, and world-class attractions characterize New Brunswick. Topping the list is the Bay of Fundy, with the higest tides in the world, marine life that includes several species of whales, stretches of wilderness coastline, and charming harbor villages.

Add to this national and international historic sites, national parks teeming with wildlife, great beaches, vibrant towns and cities, and a thriving diversity of cultures, and you might wonder how the population can remain so utterly laid-back, but that’s just another facet of New Brunswick’s charm. The province is an old place in New World terms, and the remains of a turbulent past are still evident in some of its quiet nooks. Near Moncton, for instance, wild strawberries perfume the air of the grassy slopes of Fort Beauséjour, where, in 1755, one of the last battles for possession of Acadia took place, with the English finally overcoming the French. Other areas of the province were settled by the British; by Loyalists, American colonists who chose to live under British rule after the American Revolution; and by Irish immigrants, many seeking to avoid the famine in their home country. If you stay in both Acadian and Loyalist regions, a trip to New Brunswick can seem like two vacations in one.

For every gesture in the provincial landscape as grand as the giant rock formations carved by the Bay of Fundy tides at Hopewell Cape, there is one as subtle as the gifted touch of a sculptor in a studio. For every experience as colorful as the mountains of lobster served at Shediac’s annual Lobster Festival, there is another as low-key as the gentle waves of the Baie des Chaleurs. New Brunswick is the luxury of an inn with five stars and the tranquillity of camping under a million.

At the heart of New Brunswick is the forest, which covers 85% of the province—nearly all its interior. The forest contributes to the economy, defines the landscape, and delights hikers, anglers, campers, and bird-watchers, but New Brunswick's soul is the sea. The biggest of Canada's three Maritime provinces, New Brunswick is largely surrounded by coastline. The warm waters of the Baie des Chaleurs, Gulf of St. Lawrence, and Northumberland Strait lure swimmers to their sandy beaches, and the chilly Bay of Fundy, with its monumental tides, draws breaching whales, whale-watchers, and kayakers.

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Fredericton

The small inland city of Fredericton, on a broad point of land jutting into the St. John River, is a gracious and beautiful place that feels...

Saint John

Like any seaport worth its salt, Saint John is a welcoming place but, more than that, it is fast transforming into a sophisticated urban destination...

Moncton and Dieppe

Metro Moncton—the second-largest city in Atlantic Canada (after Halifax, Nova Scotia)—is an attractive, welcoming city, with several family...

St. Andrews by-the-Sea

A designated National Historic District on Passamaquoddy Bay, St. Andrews by-the-Sea is one of North America's prettiest resort towns. It has...

Cape Enrage, Hopewell Cape, and Nearby

Rocky Cape Enrage juts more than 7 km (4½ miles) out into the bay, with a 6-km (4-mile) driftwood-cluttered beach, a lighthouse, and spectacular...

Miramichi

Celebrated for salmon rivers that reach into some of the province's richest forests, and the ebullient nature of its residents (Scottish, English...

Shediac

Shediac is the self-proclaimed Lobster Capital of the World, and it has a giant lobster sculpture to prove it. Beautiful Parlee Beach also draws...

Fundy National Park

Preserving a unique wilderness on the shores of the Bay of Fundy, this national park is the province's top attraction, with areas of true wilderness...

Sackville

Sackville is an idyllic university town complete with a swan-filled pond. Its stately homes and ivy-clad university buildings are shaded by...

Caraquet

Perched on Caraquet Bay, along the beautiful Baie des Chaleurs, with Québec's Gaspé Peninsula beckoning across the inlet, Caraquet is rich in...

Woodstock

New Brunswick’s first incorporated town (in 1856), Woodstock still preserves many fine old buildings on its leafy streets. A focal point of...

Grand Falls

The St. John River rushes over a high cliff, squeezes through a narrow rocky gorge, and emerges as a wider river at the town of Grand Falls...

Village of Gagetown

The historic riverside Village of Gagetown—not to be confused with the Gagetown military base at Oromocto—bustles in summer, when artists welcome...

Edmundston

Edmundston, the unofficial capital of Madawaska County, has always depended on the wealth of the deep forest around it—the legend of Paul Bunyan...

St. Martins

The fishing village of St. Martins has a rich shipbuilding heritage, whispering caves, miles of lovely beaches, spectacular tides, and a cluster...

Grand Manan Island

Grand Manan, the largest of the three Fundy Islands, is also the farthest from the mainland. You might see whales, seals, or the occasional...

Campobello Island

Neatly manicured, preening itself in the bay, Campobello Island has always had a special appeal for the wealthy and the famous. ...

Florenceville-Bristol

The title "French Fry Capitol of the World" does nothing to convey how pretty Florenceville is, with its Main Street running right along the...

Bouctouche

This idyllic, bustling town on the sandy shores of Bouctouche Bay is famous for pristine beauty and for Le Pays de la Sagouine, a theme park...

Deer Island

One of the pleasures of Deer Island is walking around the fishing wharves like those at Chocolate Cove. Exploring the island takes only a few...

Shippagan

Shippagan is an important fishing and marine education center as well as a bustling town with lots of amenities and the gateway to the idyllic...

Hartland

Hartland is best known for having the longest covered bridge in the world, still carrying traffic across the wide St. John River. A sleepy little...

St. Stephen

...

Kouchibouguac National Park

On the warm east coast, you'll enter through old-growth forest laced with trails before emerging on glorious golden sands, with dunes and lagoons...

Mactaquac Provincial Park

Just a short drive from the provincial capital, this 525-hectare (1,300-acre) park alongside the St. John River is geared up for all kinds of...

Kings Landing Historical Settlement

New Brunswick became home to many Loyalists who headed north across the border after the American Revolution, and this living-history site charmingly...

Fredericton

The small inland city of Fredericton, on a broad point of land jutting into the St. John River, is a gracious and beautiful place that feels...

Saint John

Like any seaport worth its salt, Saint John is a welcoming place but, more than that, it is fast transforming into a sophisticated urban destination...

Moncton and Dieppe

Metro Moncton—the second-largest city in Atlantic Canada (after Halifax, Nova Scotia)—is an attractive, welcoming city, with several family...

St. Andrews by-the-Sea

A designated National Historic District on Passamaquoddy Bay, St. Andrews by-the-Sea is one of North America's prettiest resort towns. It has...

Cape Enrage, Hopewell Cape, and Nearby

Rocky Cape Enrage juts more than 7 km (4½ miles) out into the bay, with a 6-km (4-mile) driftwood-cluttered beach, a lighthouse, and spectacular...

Miramichi

Celebrated for salmon rivers that reach into some of the province's richest forests, and the ebullient nature of its residents (Scottish, English...

Shediac

Shediac is the self-proclaimed Lobster Capital of the World, and it has a giant lobster sculpture to prove it. Beautiful Parlee Beach also draws...

Sackville

Sackville is an idyllic university town complete with a swan-filled pond. Its stately homes and ivy-clad university buildings are shaded by...

Woodstock

New Brunswick’s first incorporated town (in 1856), Woodstock still preserves many fine old buildings on its leafy streets. A focal point of...

Caraquet

Perched on Caraquet Bay, along the beautiful Baie des Chaleurs, with Québec's Gaspé Peninsula beckoning across the inlet, Caraquet is rich in...

St. Martins

The fishing village of St. Martins has a rich shipbuilding heritage, whispering caves, miles of lovely beaches, spectacular tides, and a cluster...

Grand Falls

The St. John River rushes over a high cliff, squeezes through a narrow rocky gorge, and emerges as a wider river at the town of Grand Falls...

Edmundston

Edmundston, the unofficial capital of Madawaska County, has always depended on the wealth of the deep forest around it—the legend of Paul Bunyan...

Village of Gagetown

The historic riverside Village of Gagetown—not to be confused with the Gagetown military base at Oromocto—bustles in summer, when artists welcome...

Florenceville-Bristol

The title "French Fry Capitol of the World" does nothing to convey how pretty Florenceville is, with its Main Street running right along the...

Bouctouche

This idyllic, bustling town on the sandy shores of Bouctouche Bay is famous for pristine beauty and for Le Pays de la Sagouine, a theme park...

Shippagan

Shippagan is an important fishing and marine education center as well as a bustling town with lots of amenities and the gateway to the idyllic...

Hartland

Hartland is best known for having the longest covered bridge in the world, still carrying traffic across the wide St. John River. A sleepy little...

St. Stephen

...

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