weather in asheville

Old Jul 17th, 2002, 02:02 PM
  #1  
k
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weather in asheville

we are thinking of moving to asheville, north carolina. i hear the weather there is cooler than the rest of the state. any comments about what it is like to live there? also, what section would be the best area to buy a house in that is reasonable? thanks for the comments...
 
Old Jul 17th, 2002, 02:32 PM
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ramjet
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k; Asheville is a mountain city located between Great Smoky Mountains and Blue Ridge Mountains at an elevation of about 2100'.The weather in summer is cooler with average high in low 80's and low 60's at night. Winter is average high in upper 40's and mid 20's night. Asheville is former all-america city, one of best places to retire, has great arts, and is home to Biltmore Estate. Population is around 220,000 (including county) and has wonderful scenery and outdoor activities. If your looking for a home it depends on whether your looking for a subdivision or wish to be in a mountain home with privacy and views; there is much to offer in the real estate market. In all Asheville is a very desirable place to live and I'm sure you will discover that if you decide to reside there.
 
Old Jul 17th, 2002, 03:12 PM
  #3  
AM
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k

Where are you moving from? What exactly would you like to know about the area? Define reasonable in terms of buying a house (cost? location?). I currently live in asheville and will be happy to answer any questions you have. Just drop me an email. Also, if you haven't already, check out the Chamber of Commerce website: http://ashevillechamber.org/
 
Old Jul 18th, 2002, 04:26 AM
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Danna
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I ride my mountain bike in the forests around Asheville almost every Saturday of the year. Maybe twice a year there is sleet or snow that stops me. So, unless you are moving from FL or AZ, I think you will find the climate mild in the winter. In the summer, you will be happy that Asheville is about 10 degrees cooler than surrounding areas.

As another point of reference, Greenville SC is only 1 hour south, but two garden-climate zones warmer. It's the altitude.

"Altitude affects attitude" I really like Asheville.
 
Old Jul 18th, 2002, 07:33 AM
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Austin
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Actually, Boone, a couple of counties north of Asheville is considered the coolest place to be in NC. It's summer temps average in the 70's, but as with all the popular places in the WNC mountains (Highlands, Hendersonville and Laurel Park, Asheville, Blowing Rock, etc...) the housing prices are astronomical -- at least by our standards, since most locals are employed by service industries that cater to tourists and don't pay worth anything.

However, the living here is very good, and that's why people put up with high housing costs, suffocating air pollution, and rampant sprawl -- which you should be prepared for if you're honestly thinking of moving here. Those are really the only drawbacks I can think of to living here. In return for enduring the drawbacks, you get unparalleled arts and culture, great nightlife and shopping, beautiful architecture, and even more beautiful scenery (at least, what the developers haven't sunk their claws into yet).

Best areas to find reasonably priced housing are in revitalizing neighborhoods like Clingman Avenue and parts of West Asheville, if you want to live in the city itself, otherwise you'd do well to look for something in the outer fringes of whatever county you're looking to settle in, because the closer you get to town the more the land costs. Unless, of course, you'd want to live in a manufactured home development, of which there are many, and where most of the locals live because we can't afford real houses -- not that that's a put down of manufactured housing. A lot of those developments are every bit as nice as "real" subdivisions, and some even have community amenities like "real" subdivisions... Just do your research first.
 
Old Jul 18th, 2002, 05:58 PM
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PT
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Asheville's weather is cooler than just about anywhere else in the south--it's one of the only places with a true four season climate. It gets warm during the summer, but rarely over 90 during the day, and the weather always cools off at night.

As for some of the other comments about Asheville, it's all relative and depends upon what you are accustomed to. Having lived in a lot of other cities during my life, I can tell you that there is no "rampant sprawl" (particularly in Asheville, where topography limits urban sprawl), no "suffocating air pollution" relative to many other cities. Housing costs are high relative to the rest of the south. The economy is not entirely dependent upon tourism--more people are still employed in manufacturing in the area, and medicine is probably the number two employer. There are also a large number of small businesses and self-employed people.
 
Old Jul 18th, 2002, 08:57 PM
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Austin
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Hi, PT... I can't help myself here.

Yes, air pollution levels may be relative, but these code orange and red ozone alerts nearly every day indicate bad air. Period.

Regarding sprawl, have you seen Patton Avenue lately? Or that ghastly townhouse project clinging to the mountainside over Sweeten Creek Road by the very tips of its toenails? In a perfect world topography would limit sprawl, but developers are a crafty bunch, indeed. I don't know about the figures for Buncombe, but last I checked, 3 people per day were moving into Henderson County, on average. Believe me, they aren't all moving downtown either. Henderson County has been losing roughly 1,000 acres of land a year to development for more than a decade -- and that sounds pretty rampant to me.
 
Old Jul 19th, 2002, 06:30 AM
  #8  
The Swami
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Unfortunately, Asheville has been ruined by Northerners and Cali New Agers who heard that The Land of Sky was a cheap alternative to San Francisco. But at least there are now multiple crystal healers and bikram yoga studios from which to choose. Thanks!
 
Old Jul 19th, 2002, 08:18 AM
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Danna
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I have to chime in too, Austin

I think you are confusing sprawl with growth. Come take a look at the Greenville Spartanburg area and learn what sprawl looks like.

I'm no scientist , but I don't think the ozone levels are necessarily tied to air pollution.

And...I think "most" of the locals live in trailers is serious hyperbole.

 
Old Jul 19th, 2002, 09:10 AM
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Austin
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Danna,

Ground-level ozone IS air pollution -- it's not all black smoke belched from factories. Respiratory illness rates are abnormally high throughout WNC because of ozone and smog. When you visit the mountains and notice distant peaks and buildings dim behind haze, it's not the natural humidity and moisture that gave the Blue Ridge Mountains and Smokey Mountains their names -- that haze is blue, while the haze that now engulfs the region is gray. Not a good sign.

And believe me, I know Greenville. I moved down there for a short period and I've never been right since. Downtown Greenville is beautiful but the rest of the city... the horror... the horror...

Yes, I'll admit that "most" locals living in trailers is hyperbole, but the fact that trailers and manufactured homes are about the only affordable housing to be found in Henderson County, unfortunately, is not. Interestly enough though, according to a co-worker of mine who sells real estate on the side has informed me that housing prices and rents in Hendersonville and Asheville have just about reached their peak. Maybe it's the economy, but I've even noticed that this summer there are a lot of what I'd consider affordable apartments for rent in the paper.

Things are getting better I think, but WNC is still bedeviled by low wages, dirty air, and high housing costs.
 
Old Jul 22nd, 2002, 11:35 AM
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Danna
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Hello again Austin - My apologies for Greenville, I hope you get over it eventually.

Well, you've depressed me now about the air pollution. i did indeed think the haze was the natural "Smokey" mountain thing. I was just reading yesterday about the effects of ozone on asthmatics. Fortunately, my own allergies are brought on by weeds like goldenrod, so I can get relief by going up to Asheville/Pisgah where there has not been such rampant clear cutting. At least, that's my theory.

I hope you're right about housing costs leveling off. We hope to retire to Asheville . (Although I see the DOW has dropped below 8000 today, so I may just work for another 50 years and retire directly to a Medicade-funded nursing home!)
 
Old Jul 22nd, 2002, 12:15 PM
  #12  
Rich
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Is there anyplace in the Southeast with more than about 50,000 residents that doesn't have several ozone action days per week? I wouldn't call Asheville's air any more polluted than most other places. I go there several times per year and have never felt like I was suffering ill effects from air pollution.

Asheville's summers are definitely cooler than most other places in the state, which is why everybody from Raleigh, Charlotte, and Greensboro wants to go there when it's 95 degrees and oppressively humid everywhere else in NC.

I love Asheville. Keep in mind, though, that it's a small city (not a small town, but not a big city, either) and therefore you may feel it has less to offer than where you're moving from. If you're moving from NYC or somewhere, you might find there isn't a lot going on (but then again, you could find that a positive thing...Asheville is pretty laid-back and low-key). I think that Asheville probably DOES have more going on culturally than most other small cities of a similar size.

If you've never been, you should definitely go visit a couple of times before you make the decision to uproot everything and go live there. I would say that about ANY move to another city, though, not just Asheville in particular. I can't imagine moving someplace I'd never been before.
 
Old Jul 24th, 2002, 05:33 PM
  #13  
wncang
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I live in Brevard, about a 40 minute drive from Asheville. We hike on trails to beautiful waterfalls, swim in ice cold lakes, and enjoy 4 wonderful seasons. However, there is a tradeoff to living here. To afford living in such an idyllic place, we have a 30 year old house that needs renovating. Housing is very expensive, compared to the pay scale of local jobs. The only reason we could afford our house is because we moved here from another area, with secure jobs and a little money in the bank.
 
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