Travel To See An Ex - Do You?

Old Jul 29th, 2002, 11:26 AM
  #1  
X
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Travel To See An Ex - Do You?

You might deny this, but studies show exs who couldn't stand each other when married still travel some distances to meet and socialize on a regular basis, some for years. Do you? Willing to discuss it? This IS a travel question, so no flamming. I'm considering it, wanted some perspective.
 
Old Jul 29th, 2002, 11:31 AM
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ttt
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No comments out there? Not silly enough for a response? What if I threw in "monkey" - ?
 
Old Jul 29th, 2002, 12:36 PM
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Sure
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Why not? There was probably something there at one time, and absence does make the heart grow fonder...blah blah blah. Living with that person may just be awful, but having a quick visit a whole other thing!
 
Old Jul 29th, 2002, 01:11 PM
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Psy
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When you think about it, all (or most) of the reasons for hating each other are removed when two people are no longer living together. It makes sense then that the initial attraction would come back after separation.

In my case, it took me a long time to get over the separation and then I began to evolve in ways that made me a much different person. So, I wouldn't travel to see my ex, but I can understand why some people might. My mother always claimed she got along better with my father after they divorced. She said she just "couldn't stand to live with him".
 
Old Jul 29th, 2002, 01:26 PM
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x
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You waited exactly 5 minutes before asking "what? no reponses?" Jesus. Give us some time.
 
Old Jul 29th, 2002, 02:45 PM
  #6  
xxx
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To me "ex" means, "been there, done that" and personally, I'd rather go on for bigger and better things.
 
Old Jul 29th, 2002, 03:05 PM
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DB
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A man will keep a "sure thing" waiting in the wings, even if he can't stand her. Protection against draughts.
 
Old Jul 29th, 2002, 07:05 PM
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yyy
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Er, DB, why would a man need protection against "draughts" unless he's allergic to beer? Unless, of course, you meant "drought." But that would mean you're illiterate, no?
 
Old Jul 29th, 2002, 07:11 PM
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xxx
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yyy
draught- a current of air(The Concise English Dictionary)
a word CAN have more than one meaning!
What was that about being illiterate?
 
Old Jul 29th, 2002, 07:29 PM
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yyy
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To xxx:

I appreciate your attempt to impress us with your ability to use the dictionary, but there are two problems with your post:

1. The commonly accepted American spelling of the word used to describe breezes and winds is "draft."

2. In any event, even if you were correct that "draught" has two commonly accepted meanings, a contextual reading of DB's post indicates that he was not trying to describe a "current of air." It makes more sense that a man will keep a sure thing waiting in the wings as protection against a dry spell/drought as opposed to a current of air/draft/draught.

Please submit your registration for Session Two of Summer School, as it appears you have failed Session One. In addition, please remember that your mommy will need to sign your report card.
 
Old Jul 29th, 2002, 07:38 PM
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ddd
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yyy
have you just escaped from the Europe forum?
 
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