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Is it worth the Brazil visa to see the Falls?

Old Jun 29th, 2016, 02:09 PM
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Is it worth the Brazil visa to see the Falls?

When I go to Iguazu to see the Falls, is it worth it for me, a US citizen who must have a visa, to go through the visa process. Apparently I have to go a consulate in person. That process would take me longer than I would expect to spend at the Brazilian side of the falls, plus the visa fee, which is $100+, I believe. I am just wondering if the "experience" on the Brazil side is worth this pre-trip aggravation.
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Old Jun 29th, 2016, 03:03 PM
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Just checked the website. The application process requires me to submit a bank statement! To demonstrate that I have enough money to support myself in Brazil - for four hours. That is outrageous. Think I just scratched the Brazil side of Iguazu from my itinerary.
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Old Jun 30th, 2016, 05:47 AM
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Your loss.
Most of the iconic photos of the falls that you have seen have been taken from the Brazilian side. What is presented from the Brazilian side is quite different from what is found on the Argentine side.
But if one has an arrogant attitude of entitlement, best to stay far from anywhere in Brazil, as it doesn't work well as a response to any of the bureaucratic frustration any tourist (or local) is likely to encounter there.

Note that the process for Brazilians to get a visa for the US is significantly more difficult, requiring several years of tax records to be submitted, among many other items, all only in person on an expensive visit to the US Consulate often thousands of miles away (in which one is left to wait hours in the hot sun on the street in a long line to get in to see someone, often lining up before dawn), and there is no guarantee of a visa (or even having your "case" heard before you are dismissed out of hand), despite paying the high fee and jumping through all the hoops the US sets up.
(I've been there several times accompanying Brazilian friends and can personally attest to all this. Even I was fed up by the end.)

Depending on when your trip takes place, there is a temporary visa waiver for a rather long period surrounding and including the Olympics/Para-Olympics.
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Old Jun 30th, 2016, 08:22 AM
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SambaChula--

I have the same question and same concern. Your answer makes it seem that the only reason not to apply for a Brasilian visa to visit the Falls is "an arrogant attitude of entitlement."

From my point of view, the dilemma is the time and trouble to apply for the visa, and the cost, versus the benefit of the visa. One day I hope to spend an entire vacation in Brasil. But now, I'd visit for only one day.

I hear you and sympathize about the trouble Brasilians have getting US visas, but that doesn't answer the question of whether it is reasonably practical for me and the OP to spend the equivalent of a day's lodging---and the time it takes to fill out a lengthy application-- just to see the Falls from another viewpoint.

Thanks for the info on the visa waiver program, but it expires before my visit in October. So unless something changes, I'll confine myself to the Argentine side.
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Old Jun 30th, 2016, 08:45 AM
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I find it best to ignore the ignorant replies of those such as Samba Chula who has no idea what sort of person and traveler I, or any other poster, is like. There are so many helpful people here. I have applied for visas elsewhere and found it always to be a reasonable process. On a few trips i acquired the visa when I landed at the airport. I have seen Niagara and I have seen Victoria. If i see Uguazu from only one side, I will be just fine. I am aware of the visa waiver time period, but unfortunately it doesnt mesh with my travel dates.
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Old Jun 30th, 2016, 09:54 AM
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@dwdvagamundo

I have the same question and same concern. Your answer makes it seem that the only reason not to apply for a Brasilian visa to visit the Falls is "an arrogant attitude of entitlement."
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No, dwdvagamundo, I found the aggrieved tone of the poster’s words, implying that he was too good to be “inconvenienced” by the process of applying for a visa—without even bothering to specify which Brazilian Consulate he uses (not all require bank statements and personal visits, and not all have a cumbersome process) to be arrogant.

It is what it is.
----
From my point of view, the dilemma is the time and trouble to apply for the visa, and the cost, versus the benefit of the visa. One day I hope to spend an entire vacation in Brasil. But now, I'd visit for only one day.
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The visa is good for ten years. Personally, I think the Brazilian side of the park, the Bird Park and the access to the spectacular helicopter ride over the falls, is well worth “the time and trouble”, if there is indeed such, of applying for a visa.
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I hear you and sympathize about the trouble Brasilians have getting US visas, but that doesn't answer the question of whether it is reasonably practical for me and the OP to spend the equivalent of a day's lodging---and the time it takes to fill out a lengthy application-- just to see the Falls from another viewpoint.
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The application is not IMO lengthy. And the cost, in the overall view of a major trip like yours, is not large.
If you choose not to get a visa, do not waste your time griping about the trivial reasons you have used to justify not doing so.
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Thanks for the info on the visa waiver program, but it expires before my visit in October. So unless something changes, I'll confine myself to the Argentine side.
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As I said to the other poster, Your Loss.
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@MyBaggage

I find it best to ignore the ignorant replies of those such as Samba Chula who has no idea what sort of person and traveler I, or any other poster, is like. There are so many helpful people here. I have applied for visas elsewhere and found it always to be a reasonable process. On a few trips i acquired the visa when I landed at the airport. I have seen Niagara and I have seen Victoria. If i see Uguazu from only one side, I will be just fine. I am aware of the visa waiver time period, but unfortunately it doesnt mesh with my travel dates.
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Again…. The visa process is what it is.
I personally have found the visa process quite simple and reasonable (from the first time to the latest) and not at all time consuming, at my home Brazilian Consulate.
I have also seen Victoria, Niagara and Angel, but the views from the Brazilian side of Iguacu are unparalled. As are the photos.
I do not, however, think I have the right to go wherever I choose to travel, though, because I live in a powerful nation, and wish to ignore the way of thinking of another sovereign nation because it is not convenient for me.
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Old Jun 30th, 2016, 12:27 PM
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SambaChula said: "I do not, however, think I have the right to go wherever I choose to travel, though, because I live in a powerful nation, and wish to ignore the way of thinking of another sovereign nation because it is not convenient for me."

I didn't get that sense from MyBaggage's OP and response, and I hope that you didn't get that from mine. There are plenty of places I as a US citizen would like to go to but cannot; Brazil is not one of them, as I can go there if I'm willing to follow the rules and I accept that.

Same for you as a citizen of the relatively rich and powerful country of Brazil.

Again, our only concern is whether it is worth the cost in time and money of a Brazilian visa at this time for the few days we would need it to see the Falls. I've decided it is not and, as you say, it is my loss. But it is also the loss of the hotels, restaurants, tour companies, etc., who will not get the some of the money I'll spend in Argentina.

Argentina and the US have recently called off their mutual "visa war" and I hope the same will happen with Brazil before I go. If it does, I'd be glad to pay a modest amount to see the Brazilian side of the Falls.

BTW-hope your country's political problems work out for the best and that you all host a great Olympic Games.
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Old Jun 30th, 2016, 04:50 PM
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Dwdvagamundo, ditto.

I think we are done here, no?
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Old Jun 30th, 2016, 05:28 PM
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Thanks. I hope my country's political problems work out for the best as well. That Mr. T is a pretty scary guy but maybe the Bern will come through after all. My city decided not long ago not to bid on the Olympic Games so who knows when "we" might host.

Btw you don't need a tour company for the falls, food is cheap and 4 nights in a good BnB is less than a visa. And...Isn't it logical that the only country who the BrazilianConsulate's site admonishes about rudeness being
grounds for denying a visa is a country whose minimal dollars they might not miss in the least?

Have a lovely half trip.
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Old Jul 1st, 2016, 03:03 PM
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Thanks. I hope my country's political problems work out for the best as well. That Mr. T is a pretty scary guy but maybe the Bern will come through after all. My city decided not long ago not to bid on the Olympic Games so who knows when "we" might host.

Btw you don't need a tour company for the falls, food is cheap and 4 nights in a good BnB is less than a visa. And...Isn't it logical that the only country who the BrazilianConsulate's site admonishes about rudeness being
grounds for denying a visa is a country whose minimal dollars they might not miss in the least?

Have a lovely half trip.
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