Living in Brasil

Old Feb 17th, 1999, 07:06 AM
  #1  
Daniel Lee
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Living in Brasil

Just curious--

Does anybody here know anything about getting a job and relocating to Brasil? (specifically Recife)

I would love to know what kind of American companies need people out in Brasil and if not, what one could do out there (like teaching English, nature conservation, etc.)

Thanks for any input!

Daniel Lee
 
Old Mar 13th, 1999, 04:27 PM
  #2  
Austin Staunch
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I'm in Rio and English schools are a dime a dozen. There are tons to teach in. Some of the best are probably Brasas, Ace, Whizard. You don't have to have much experience, just tell them that your willing to learn. Don't count on as much work for teaching in Recifé, or rather don't plan on making much money. São Paulo and Rio are the biggest cities and have more people who need to learn English. If you were privately tutoring, don't plan on near as many students outside of these cities. This is what I've heard from teachers here. If your going to teach, you would be better off doing it in one of these two cities. Also check the South American Explorers sight and look in the travelers bullentin board. In the Brazil section I saw an inquiry about a company who was looking for someone to handle Brazilian sales. It may have even been in the Northeast. It was posted awhile back, but it's still there. Good luck! -A-
 
Old Apr 2nd, 1999, 04:42 AM
  #3  
dion ross
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Ho. Don't worry about getting a job as an english teacher. Jesus, there are just as many oppotunities as you can expect. Better putting an ad in the town whre you plan on living and people
will call you up. Remember that the price for english teachers isn't much. But you'll meet nice people and get by.
It is very hard to work for american or other companies, because you must have a work book and it is called CTPS. Brazil is a burocratic country, so you'll have to put up with a lot to get working paper, while anyone that wants to teach english does it on the qt, receives in cash. Charge as you go, because if not you will never receive. Cordially drk
 
Old Apr 2nd, 1999, 07:46 AM
  #4  
Daniel
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Hey Austin and Dion:

Thank you both very much for your responses. It pretty much confirms what I've thought about teaching English in Brasil--that Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro are the only places to consider for serious work.

So as far as working there on the QT, I still wouldn't be able to avoid the issue of living/working there a long time (I'm talking years).

So what are the steps I would need to take to start this process going? How can I get a VISA or some kind of green card for an extended stay?

So you also think that posting my service in a newspaper out there would be my best bet? What about somewhere on the internet?

Also, do you have any experience actually doing this?

Thank you and looking forward to your reply,

Daniel
 
Old Apr 2nd, 1999, 09:23 AM
  #5  
daniel lee
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It is also a shame that more people don't share their input here on Brasil. It is such a marvelous country and it deserves more education and understanding about it. People need to be exposed to everything this land has to offer with its riches of music, rythym, arts, food, and natural beauty such as Iguacu Falls, the Pantanal, and of course the Amazon.
The France/Europe forums are teeming with messages and I just wish that this site here could have the same kind of intellectual stimulus.

Daniel
 
Old May 7th, 1999, 12:29 AM
  #6  
jt
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There are so many english schools all over Brasil. More then then just Rio or Sao Paulo. The demand for English is such that even in the small cities there is a big demand. I have friends(Americans) who began teaching on the side for $10 an hour per student once a week. With usually about 10-15 students per class. So with 5 classes a week thats $3000 per month. Even some Brasilians do it. By the way I"m Brasilian and thats one way I'll be earning my money in Brasil. most tourists know about the big attractions
Rio, Sa Paulo, Recife, Angra dos Reis, Foz De iguacu and etc...and all those places are beautifull, especially Rio my hometown. But life is very intersting in the smaller towns as well. Anyway Good Luck.
 
Old May 7th, 1999, 01:49 PM
  #7  
daniel lee
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ok guys:

thank you very much for your input. i am very excited at the idea of teaching english in brasil. i love that country and it's comforting to know that i have something to fall back on (in teaching english).

so to prepare for this, i need to know details from anybody that's done this. what are the first steps? do i need to print out my own worksheets and books i assume? and i am still needing info on working in brasil for a period of years. will i need a work visa, green card, etc.?

daniel
 
Old May 7th, 1999, 01:53 PM
  #8  
daniel
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hey guys,

thank you very much for your input.

so now that i am excited about this, i need all the info i can get to make sure i do this right.

any of you with experience, can you tell me what are the first steps i will need to follow, such as getting a working visa/permit/green card, or putting in the ad in a paper?

thank you,

daniel
 
Old Jul 8th, 1999, 01:30 AM
  #9  
Vanessa
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Hello all - I am a high school student who is moving to Brasil in February to be sort of an exchange student for two years. I have been given the choice of which city to live in, and I am a bit confused about which cities might give me the "whole Brazilian" experience I am looking for. I am of course looking at Sao Paulo, Rio De Janeiro, and a few others. Can anyone out there offer information on other cities, as well as these? Where would be the best place to spend two years? Thanks for your help.

-Vanessa

(Also, do many people in Brasil speak English or is it necessary to know Portuguese to survive? I know some and I am sure I will learn quickly once I am there but I am nervous about how I will communicate in the beginning. And, are Brazilian people "easy" on foreigners? (i.e. - do they make fun of them for not knowing the language, etc...or are they generally helpful?)Thanks again!
 
Old Jul 12th, 1999, 07:24 PM
  #10  
adriana
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Daniel and Vanessa:

Daniel, why don't you try to find a big company that could send you ever here? I work for GM here in Brasil and there are lots of americans working here and earning well.

Vanessa, you won't have any problems to speak with us. Brazilans simply love foreign people, maily Americans. When deciding the city consider that Sao Paulo is bigger and for a student it has more options and also if you like beaches in 1or 2 hours by car you can reach Sao Paulo's beaches - there are lots of beaches and they are very beautiful. Rio is not what it used to be. It is dirty and dangerous but it is without any doubt a beatiful city.
 
Old Jul 12th, 1999, 07:25 PM
  #11  
adriana
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Daniel and Vanessa:

Daniel, why don't you try to find a big company that could send you ever here? I work for GM here in Brasil and there are lots of americans working here and earning well.

Vanessa, you won't have any problems to speak with us. Brazilans simply love foreign people, maily Americans. When deciding the city consider that Sao Paulo is bigger and for a student it has more options and also if you like beaches in 1or 2 hours by car you can reach Sao Paulo's beaches - there are lots of beaches and they are very beautiful. Rio is not what it used to be. It is dirty and dangerous but it is without any doubt a beatiful city.
 
Old Jul 20th, 1999, 12:26 PM
  #12  
joel
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It is currently illegal to spend more than 180 days of any year in Brasil, but then the laws do change. If you want to stay for years, the easiest thing to do is to marry a Brasilian. If you want to work there, you will need a Brasilian company to sponsor your work visa. You will need a CV translated into Portuguese, a letter from the company explaining why they must hire you and that there are NO Brasilians in the country that can do the work. Then you need your diploma translated into Portuguese and "regularized" by the consulate nearest the school or university. Then you need the forms filled out and the fees, plus a document from the police department of the city where you live in America. There are people in Brasil called despachantes who can file the paperwork for you. They usually charge between $1500-2000 depending on your bargaining skills. After your application is approved and printed in their Federal register, then you have to leave the country and get the work pass stamped in your passport.

You can stay there and do illegal work, but if they find you, you will have big problems. If you overstay your visa, there will be fines when you leave, and big fines if they think you have been working. It may seem quite chaotic, but their immigration service is computerized and they do know who comes and goes and when. Perhaps if you come and go from some remote border outpost at a time when the computer is down, you could get out without paying. There are lots of different police in Brasil, but the Federal Police are not ones to mess around with. You will need to find a despachante who will know who, when and how much to pay. Boa Sorte.
 

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