Cilantro/Coriander in Mexico

Old Oct 28th, 2016, 08:35 AM
  #1  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 90
Cilantro/Coriander in Mexico

Hi all,

So this might sound like a weird question, but we're planning a trip to Mexico (Caribbean side) early next year and one of us is hypersensitive to coriander. Normally this wouldn't be an issue, except that from what I'm hearing, it's nearly impossible to eat food that does not contain coriander in Mexico.

Can anyone please confirm that?

Thanks again,
Daniel
Danielm is offline  
Old Oct 28th, 2016, 09:17 AM
  #2  
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 524
Cilantro, is a prime ingredient in many meals especially sauces.
You will need to ask beforehand and even then, there is always a possibility that it will find it's way in your sandwich or soup or meal...
Rohelio is online now  
Old Oct 28th, 2016, 09:42 AM
  #3  
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 9,298
As Rohelio suggests, I also doubt you'll get the real story all the time. And I don't think it's just true of Mexico but in many places where they aim to please and will say what a customer wants to hear, having little or no experience with food allergies. If the consequences could be dire, maybe choose a more 1st world destination.
MmePerdu is online now  
Old Oct 28th, 2016, 09:49 AM
  #4  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 93,334
<<I'm hearing, it's nearly impossible to eat food that does not contain coriander in Mexico.>>

That is not my experience at all. But my travels are only on the west coast side.

I've never seen cilantro on a piece of fresh broiled fish or roasted chicken, for example. Where I would expect it to 'sneak' in would be things like salsa, ceviche, traditional Mexican dishes.
suze is offline  
Old Oct 28th, 2016, 04:14 PM
  #5  
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 18,437
I assume you just don't like the flavor not that it makes you sick.

Yes chopped onion and cilantro is almost like parsley is here, it get sprinkled all over many dishes. But you'll be able to see it. I would avoid anything with a salsa verde which probably has handfulls blended in.

YOu will just have to say "por favor no cilantro" when you order.

Or you can order American style food (burgers and pizza) at gringo-oriented restaurants and then, like suze, you will not see it much.
mlgb is offline  
Old Oct 28th, 2016, 07:45 PM
  #6  
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 524
Exactly... well said, if you eat lots of junk fast food such as pizzas, burgers, fish sandwiches and take out, then your chances of eating any cilantro is reduced drastically. Unfortunately, your chances of experiencing excellent mexican dishes will de completely erased.
Rohelio is online now  
Old Oct 28th, 2016, 11:21 PM
  #7  
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 7,952
Daniel, if going to an AI most of them are very good about those with allergies.

And.. as noted.. if they eat American food they will likely not find coriander in it.
justineparis is offline  
Old Oct 29th, 2016, 08:36 AM
  #8  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 93,334
<at gringo-oriented restaurants>

Hate to break the news to you two, but Mexican people eat hamburgers and pizzas too. Domino's Pizza and McD's are extremely popular in PV and it's not the tourists who are in there.
suze is offline  
Old Oct 29th, 2016, 10:48 AM
  #9  
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 20,145
There are all sorts of places to eat on the Carib side. We enjoy some of the best Italian, fish, mid eastern, etc etc food here. You can also find non chain restaurants that serve all sorts of burgers, ribs, Argentinian steaks, vegan, etc etc. Also, the Yucatecan/Mayan food is different than reg Tex Mex. they don't use as much cilantro.

I can't stand the taste of cilantro in the states but like the local grown cilantro. The one in the US also gives me ageda (heart burn). Not so much here. Different variety, I guess.
cybor is offline  
Old Oct 29th, 2016, 01:43 PM
  #10  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 93,334
I never eat "junk fast food" but I do eat things other than "Mexican" dishes in Mexico.

You can make fun of the suggestion, but the easiest and most helpful advice we can give the OP is, the best way to avoid cilantro would be to eat things other than "Mexican" cuisine.
suze is offline  
Old Oct 31st, 2016, 11:51 AM
  #11  
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 3,022
Rohelio, thanks for trying to get the topic back on track.
OP, you will find cilantro in ceviche, so pick it out unless supersensitive.
jamie99 is offline  
Old Oct 31st, 2016, 01:12 PM
  #12  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 93,334
suze is offline  
Old Oct 31st, 2016, 07:22 PM
  #13  
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 9,540
I used to detest cilantro. Then, after several trips to Mexico and experiencing great food with cilantro, I love it. Unless you have an allergy, perhaps try it when you visit.
MichelleY is offline  
Old Oct 31st, 2016, 07:49 PM
  #14  
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 9,298
I agree that cilantro can be an acquired taste. I still remember the first time I tasted it, in the '70s in a Chinese chicken salad in Los Altos CA (how's that for total cilantro recall). My first thought, it tasted like soap. But I've long since come around and it's now often in my fridge to add to all kind of things.
MmePerdu is online now  
Old Nov 1st, 2016, 07:08 AM
  #15  
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 30,575
What do you mean when you say you are both "hypersensitive" to coriander? Does that mean you both have a reaction to it or just don't like the taste? Like MichelleY, I too used to hate cilantro but after several trips to Mexico and having it in a number of recipes, I don't hate it anymore (not to say I love it). I still am not a fan of it sprinkled on top of food but when cooked in a recipe, it often works quite well. I think you will be somewhat limited if you want to experience Mexican food but without cilantro. I'm sure it can be done but in my experience, cilantro is used quite often in Mexican cuisine.
tom42 is offline  
Old Nov 1st, 2016, 08:21 AM
  #16  
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 18,437
Mexicans eat Chinese food, does that make it Mexican? If are going to an AI or to Cancun (assuming thats what you mean by Caribbean side?), I don't think you'll have trouble finding food that isn't Mexican cuisine (modern or traditional). Many Americans are not fond of new flavors or things they don't grow up eating. Hence the need for a plethora of hamburger, pizza and Italian restaurants in tourist havens around the world. Can't let the tourists starve after all. It is also possible that if you keep trying cilantro you might grow to accept or even like it.
mlgb is offline  
Old Nov 1st, 2016, 02:57 PM
  #17  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 90
Thanks everyone for the responses. I am not allergic at all, and hypersensitive just means I really hate the taste of it (can't stand it, would be more correct), but having said that, I'll take your advice and go along with it, worst thing I'll just try to take it out with every local authentic Mexican meal that has it.

Danielm is offline  
Old Nov 1st, 2016, 03:35 PM
  #18  
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 9,540
Daniel - I found the salsas and guacamole were the best way to ease into it!
MichelleY is offline  
Old Nov 1st, 2016, 05:18 PM
  #19  
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 7,584
Some people really can't stand the flavor -- it's like soap to them. Ina Garten, the famed cookbook author, is one of them. Happily I am not, but I get that a segment of the population cannot enjoy it. I don't think it's a question of getting used to it.
Fra_Diavolo is online now  
Old Nov 1st, 2016, 05:58 PM
  #20  
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 20,145
Fra, I used to be one of those people who couldn't stand it but now like it. Two things happened - one is that I think the cilantro varieties down here in Mexico may be different than the ones I was used to in the US. The other is that most of the Mexican foods in the Yucatan are from a Mayan regional influence. Unlike the Mexican foods that most people are used to, Yucatecan food uses either no cilantro or a smaller amount. I was able to get used to it slowly.
cybor is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

FODOR'S VIDEO