Voltage questions, Europe

Sep 27th, 2007, 12:23 PM
  #1  
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Voltage questions, Europe

We'll be in Italy next month and I need to take a curling iron. I use a 1-inch barrel. As I understand it, these are my options:

1) Take my 110 iron + converter + adapter. I'm not sure how safe or reliable this option is.

2) Buy an American dual voltage iron (about $35) + adapter. (Does Italy have the little two-prong plugs?).

Or 3) buy an iron over there. I wouldn't mind doing this, but the first couple of days we'll be in San Gim and Castellina. I don't imagine those cities have the kind of stores that sell curling irons...do they?

Thanks for any input...Jeanne
JeanneB is offline  
Sep 27th, 2007, 12:30 PM
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Hi JeanneB,

If you do a search here, there have been 2 or 3 questions like yours asked in the past week or so.
Michel_Paris is offline  
Sep 27th, 2007, 12:34 PM
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instead of buying a dual voltage one that really won't work as well - buy one there. You can probably even but one in your arrival airport
janisj is offline  
Sep 27th, 2007, 02:35 PM
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If there isn't a store in San Gim or Castellina that sells curling irons and other small electrical appliances (try hardware stores, appliance stores, and some tabbacchi), there is the COOP (?) supermarket in Poggibonsi a couple of minutes from the autostrada IIRC.

How are you getting to San Gim or Castellina? If you are flying into Pisa or Florence and then driving, you should go right through Poggibonsi en route to either.
tdyls is offline  
Sep 27th, 2007, 03:59 PM
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JeanneB,

Your understanding of the options is pretty good. Here is an opinion.

1) Uh uh.
2) Yes. (Yes, but Italians are round.) See below.
3) Don't know those towns but I know that every Italian woman wants to look good, and they succeed. Shopping will be a memorable experience, but paying the Italian price may be something you want to forget.

For 2) Go to Amazon and search. They have plenty of these things for $15 to $20 and they have plenty of buyers' reviews. Also get a plug converter for American two flats to Continental two rounds. Check to see if you need a grounded plug adapter. If you buy enough stuff at Amazon you qualify for free shipping, plus you probably won't have to pay sales tax. This matters if you are in a sales tax state.

hopscotch is offline  
Sep 27th, 2007, 04:30 PM
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Thanks. I'll check out Amazon right away.

(I did searches for "dual voltage", "voltage" and "dual voltage iron". Got nothing recent. I didn't specify Italy, though...would that have made a difference?
JeanneB is offline  
Sep 27th, 2007, 04:40 PM
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Check to see if you need a grounded plug adapter.

Sorry, but what am I to "check"? The specs on the iron? The hotel? (I'm not real smart about voltage...can ya tell?)
JeanneB is offline  
Sep 27th, 2007, 04:54 PM
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I personally would not buy a dual voltage one if you are happy w/ your current single voltage model.

The thing is - dual voltage hair dryers/curling irons do not work at their highest temps/power when used at the higher voltage. This is to protect both you and the appliance. But it still doesn't work all the time and will sometimes either melt the thing or blow the electricity in the entire B&B/hotel And the owners/other guests will not like you very much if that happens.

Just buy a single voltage Europen model when you are in Italy. It will work better and there is much less chance of it blowing up on you.
janisj is offline  
Sep 27th, 2007, 07:25 PM
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I did a search on Amazon.com for "travel curling iron" and got a bunch of possibles. I can't tell if these things require a grounded plug. You can tell when you get it if the plug is an American grounded version -- three prongs.

In light of your comments about your electrical capabilities you would be safer to go with the advice of janisj. It's a one-off expense so buy it over there.


hopscotch is offline  
Sep 28th, 2007, 12:41 PM
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After researching, I'm inclined toward buying over there. We land in Florence and will be driving to San Gim. I'll stop and check out the COOP at Poggibonsi. Thanks for the tip.

Does anyone know anything about Italian curling irons? Will choices be similar to here? I can't use smaller than 1" barrel.
JeanneB is offline  
Sep 28th, 2007, 01:06 PM
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Jeanne, I'll be in Italy next week and I am just going to buy one there. By the time you buy the converter and adapter, try to figure it out, and worrying if you'll fry your hair off or blow the electricity, it justs makes sense to buy it. You'll have it for your next trip too.
ljc4creb is offline  
Sep 28th, 2007, 01:37 PM
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I'm not leaving til Oct 31st. Would you write and let me know what kind of selection you found over there? I cannot use the little barrel...I'm using the iron to tame curly hair, not to curl it.

After you've looked, I sure would appreciate your letting me know if you don't see the 1" or 1 1/4" barrel. Depending on when you're coming back, there might still be time for me to buy a dual voltage iron here. Thanks.
jeannebab-AT--comcast-DOT-net
JeanneB is offline  

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