USA vs Western Europe Prices

Sep 9th, 2006, 05:37 AM
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USA vs Western Europe Prices

What costs more in the USA than in Europe?
What costs more in W. Europe than in the USA?
GSteed is offline  
Sep 9th, 2006, 05:40 AM
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Wouldn't it depend on where in the US you were talking about as well as where in Europe?
Carrybean is offline  
Sep 9th, 2006, 05:53 AM
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yes, prices vary drastically across Western Europe, not only by country but by size of city, of course. It's the same in the US -- I can have prices vary on a loaf of bread just by going to different stores within 25 miles of where I live. Gasoline varies about 25 cents a gallon right now depending on the station's location in the city.

So, in very very general terms I couldn't even answer this except the only thing that comes to mind as consistently cheaper in Europe than the US (in France, the only place I know local stuff a lot) is bread. I believe the reason (at least one) is that the price is subsidized by the govt. I don't really know what a loaf of bread costs in other countries in grocery stores, though, as I've never paid attention since I wasn't shopping for groceries there.
Christina is offline  
Sep 9th, 2006, 05:53 AM
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It depends also on either visiting on living there
norween is offline  
Sep 9th, 2006, 05:55 AM
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@Christina :
No the bread is not subsidized by the government (and the bread price is very similar in the adjacent countries like Belgium, Luxemburg, ...)
norween is offline  
Sep 9th, 2006, 06:01 AM
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The production of Milk, Butter and Cheese and many other things are subsidized. But most of the money goes to the big companies like Nestlé!
logos999 is offline  
Sep 9th, 2006, 06:04 AM
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The only systematic common points a can think about, but that's from the 'leaving there' point of view :
Cheaper in USA : energy (gas, electricity), and energy using things (cars, electric appliances, ..), clothes
Cheaper in Europe : public transports, health care, education
For the rest, it depends a lot on where as mentionned before
norween is offline  
Sep 9th, 2006, 06:37 AM
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Norween, you're right I would add to your list of things cheaper in the US ...water. But I think that's not as general, I don't think it is as expensive in northern europe countries as it is here in Spain.
kenderina is offline  
Sep 9th, 2006, 06:44 AM
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Good point Kenderina, tap water is expensive (and i just looked, Spain is among the cheapest EU countries for water, the cheapest being Italy, the most expensive was a surprise to me : Denemark !)
norween is offline  
Sep 9th, 2006, 06:51 AM
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Sure , norween ? I mean, I'm not talking about the water you ask for in a restaurant..but the bill you pay each month for the tap water you have at home (in the kitchen, in the bathroom)..I don't remember where I've read they say Spain and Italy have the highest bills in Europe.
kenderina is offline  
Sep 9th, 2006, 07:16 AM
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Wine is usually much cheaper in Europe, esp. when ordering by the glass in a restaurant. It's very easy to get a quite nice glass of wine for 3€ at cafes and restaurants in Belgium, France, Germany, etc. (Scandinavia is a different story, I know alcohol in general is expensive there). In the U.S., most places charge at least $5 for a glass of wine, and that's for the most mass-produced, ordinary stuff. Glass prices for good wines (if they are available by the glass at all) in the U.S. are much higher.
BTilke is offline  
Sep 9th, 2006, 07:21 AM
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What i found was a two year old survey (from the french "agence de l'eau") and the prices mentionned were / per cubic meter :
Italy : 0.78 Euro, Spain : 1.42 Euro, France : 2.76 Euros, Denemark : 4.98
Those were indicated as national average (and, at least in France, there are tremendous differences from city to city)
norween is offline  
Sep 9th, 2006, 07:29 AM
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The cost of a glass of wine is what came to mind for me also. I have always found wine (by the glass or the bottle) in Italy is so less expensive than the cost here along the westcoast of the US..taking into consideration comprable quality of wine of course.
LoveItaly is offline  
Sep 9th, 2006, 07:35 AM
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Munich: 2.85€/m2.
logos999 is offline  
Sep 9th, 2006, 07:37 AM
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m3 that is
logos999 is offline  
Sep 9th, 2006, 07:48 AM
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Doesn't taxation enter into some of this. Doesn't a lot Europe and the U.K. look to VAT/sales taxes for national revenue, whereas the US looks to income tax for revenue. Aren't the shelf prices in Europe after taxes. In the US shelf prices are pre sales tax.

Wine in the US is priced after addition of the state applied 'sin' tax but before the addition of state and local sales tax. I don't the Europeans apply a 'sin' tax to wine.

Just a thought.
Big_Red is offline  
Sep 9th, 2006, 07:49 AM
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Oh, yes, I understand. There are big differences here too as in France but the info is right as an average. Here is going up though, due to the lack of rain. Denmark price is what amazes me, I suppose it is because is a small country.
And yes, wine is probably cheaper..but I don't drink !! LOL
kenderina is offline  
Sep 9th, 2006, 07:52 AM
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A "sin" tax ? That's funny
kenderina is offline  
Sep 9th, 2006, 07:54 AM
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The shelf prices are 'taxes included' indeed (what you see is what you pay)
and for the "don't the Europeans apply a 'sin' tax to wine.?" Somehow, yes : in France taxes on wines and tobaccos go direct to the Securite Sociale (the national health insurance) fund
norween is offline  
Sep 9th, 2006, 07:59 AM
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Here too, as in France, but ..."sin" ? no, just a deluxe item
kenderina is offline  

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