University Style/ France

Old Aug 7th, 2015, 08:15 AM
  #1  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 29
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
University Style/ France

I am moving to Orleans,France to study French for two semesters. I am a 25 year old American girl. Each day I catch myself wanting to buy more to prepare for France. Also, I don't want to be pinpointed as an American girl.
I know that the French wear neutrals and layers. What I mostly find on google is articles about Parisians, and I know that not all French dress "Parisian chic." So here are some questions:
What kind of coats do the students wear in France during winter?
What type of bag do the students carry? Backpack or shoulder bag? What colors?
Do French carry their text books around school? Or are there lockers available?
Any other advice is always appreciated!
Thank you all in advance!!
Jfgarner is offline  
Old Aug 7th, 2015, 08:39 AM
  #2  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 34,243
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
To be honest, wear what students would wear at home, presuming you don't live in Hawaii or something. Don't worry about colors at all, if I had to say anything about that, something dark (which is better for a bag, anyway, won't show dirt as much and is versatile). Don't overdo it, you can shop when you get there, if you want.

I've attended two universities in France and I certainly never saw any lockers around, but I'm afraid I don't know what you are talking about. Buidlings are spread out all over, of course, just like in the US. We never had lockers at any university I attended in the US, either (3). Except maybe in the gym.

Down coats are pretty popular all over the world, actually (I mean something like North Face, Patagonia, etc), the thinner kind, including Paris. But I'm thinking of the jackets. I don't know about the dead of winter and if you want something longer, though.

I haven't been in France in winter, but the rest of the year, and around students, and they dress casually, of course. HEre, this is a picture of Parisian students, probably in Fall, as they have jackets, see what they look like http://www.letudiant.fr/educpros/enq...quotidien.html
Christina is offline  
Old Aug 7th, 2015, 08:45 AM
  #3  
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 57,890
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Have never seen a university anywhere that has lockers - since typically your classes are spread out at various times in different buildings. If one needs to take books to a class (rare - doesn't one do the work back in your room or the library) you just carry them. Not like high school where classes are back to back in one small building.

Frankly I would not rush out and buy a lot of clothes in the US - but wait until you get to France and buy what you find you need there.
nytraveler is offline  
Old Aug 7th, 2015, 09:37 AM
  #4  
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 78,322
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Yes wait and see with cheap euro things are not so expensive as before. And IME with a son who went thru that age he wore exactly the same attire Americans his age did. Put angst to rest and wing it - buy things you need there.
PalenQ is offline  
Old Aug 7th, 2015, 09:39 AM
  #5  
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 22,773
Likes: 0
Received 6 Likes on 1 Post
Students look like students everywhere in the world: classic, quirky, alternative, invisible or whatever.

Frankly, I have never actually seen a French student carrying a textbook, but they do tend to have backpacks so just about anything could be in them.

I would tend to agree that if this is any concern at all of yours, bring as little clothing as possible with you and buy a couple of items from time to time as needed.
kerouac is offline  
Old Aug 7th, 2015, 11:37 AM
  #6  
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 10,169
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
When my son was a student in France he wore the same things he did in the US, jeans jeans jeans.

I will offer two cautions to the advice above:

(1) students seem to wear fewer bright colors, esp in winter, than in the US. Scarves are essential, big wooly ones in winter, silky ones in summer but pretty much universal on men and women.

(2) on a recent couple of weeks in a part of Paris with lots and lots of young people, we did not see one single woman on the street in athletic clothing except those who were actually exercising: no running tights except on runners, no jog bras as outer garments, no yoga pants on anyone. Literally, no one. This was strikingly different from Boston.

(3) the conversion to bicycles as a way of getting around town in the past five years has been amazing, but we hardly ever saw anyone wearing Tour de France/Italian racing spandex outfits, really really rare on the street. Women generally cycled in skirts or dresses., which, at least in summer, seemed more popular than in the US.
Ackislander is offline  
Old Aug 8th, 2015, 02:08 AM
  #7  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 8,156
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
http://www.univ-orleans.fr/vie
sheila is offline  
Old Dec 6th, 2015, 09:44 AM
  #8  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 29
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Thank you for all your responses! I am in France now and contrary to what I read before coming, they often wear colors, hoodies, tennis shoes, and jeans. Also I see most of them carry a shoulder bag with their books and not a backpack
Jfgarner is offline  
Old Dec 6th, 2015, 12:19 PM
  #9  
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 78,322
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
prety darn much just like American college kids - except for the big noses you'd think these were Americans!

Are you in La Source and living in Olivet - please elaborate if you can - I've lived there for several spells (Orleans - actually Saran just north of Orleans) and am curious about your impressions - what kind of living arrangement do you have - with locals or other students from abroad, etc.

Merci Au revoir!
PalenQ is offline  
Old Dec 6th, 2015, 10:43 PM
  #10  
 
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 6,079
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Curious to know where your read that students in France wouldn't wear hoodies, tennis shoes and jeans?
Tulips is offline  
Old Dec 6th, 2015, 11:27 PM
  #11  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 20,533
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Just out of curiosity I googled a bit and found this blog by a university student which includes some entries about her clothes and mentions some cheap to mid-price brands/shops (most of which will have their own websites, too):

http://www.lapetitepauline.com/
PatrickLondon is offline  
Old Dec 7th, 2015, 03:06 AM
  #12  
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 7,315
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Most of what's written by American "experts" about clothing in Europe is pure hogwash. I believe that when these experts are in Europe they see only things that confirm their preconceptions.
bvlenci is offline  
Old Dec 7th, 2015, 05:48 AM
  #13  
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 8,974
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Couldn't you google "orleans winter " , and gradually add additional words, to find IMAGES of what they wear?

FWIW, Orleans was a traffic nightmare two years ago when we errantly stopped there to find a hotel.
tomboy is offline  
Old Dec 7th, 2015, 08:17 AM
  #14  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 29
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
PalenQ I am living in Olivet with a host family. They provide me with breakfast/dinner during the week, lunch on weekends. I am close to the Loiret. I really enjoy the center of Orleans, not so much La Source. And yes it seems that the French students are a lot like American students. Since I'm studying French at IDF with other foreigners, I haven't made any actual french friends. It's my third month here and I still cannot hardly understand french. It's a little discouraging. I'm also leaving this month since I have enough French credits after this semester to have a BA in French. I adore France, but CAF,OFII, and the banks are kinda a nightmare for foreigners.
Tulips, I read tons of articles on french fashion. I read that the french only wear neutral colors, rarely wear jeans, wear ballerina flats and never tennis shoes (also supposedly this screams american tourist), very light makeup (many wear a lot of makeup), and the list goes on. One thing that's true is the trench is still very much worn!
bvlenci I agree with you haha!
Tomboy, I tried to google things like that. It's mostly models wearing neutral colors! Also yes I wouldn't attempt to drive here. I take the bus and tram. The public transportation is great!
Jfgarner is offline  
Old Dec 7th, 2015, 08:28 AM
  #15  
 
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 6,079
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Those were most likely not European articles. As you found out yourself, everyone wears jeans and sports shoes!

There was a post recently from someone who thought that her young teenage daughters could not wear shorts in the summer in Italy. And the 'no trainers' thing comes up a lot.

Enjoy your remaining time in Orleans, Jfgarner - a pity you did not meet more young French people. My daughter is in Paris studying French, and she said the same thing.
Tulips is offline  
Old Dec 7th, 2015, 08:36 AM
  #16  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 49,553
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
You've been there for 3 months and care barely speak French?? Something is wrong. Do you get out into town and force yourself to converse with people? You can't learn another language in a vacuum.

And you'll get a BA in French without being able to read, write, and converse fluently? That's a bit appalling.

Seems like the dress code is the least of your problems. I don't know where you got all these silly ideas that French kids wear neutral-colored clothing and no sneakers and no hoodies. That hasn't been the case for decades.

Personally, I would forget about what to wear and make sure you leave France with a good knowledge of the language - otherwise, it's been a waste of time IMO. French isn't that hard a language, and you should be immersed in it given where you are. Not sure what the problem is, but I wouldn't let this experience go to waste. It doesn't matter what you wear while you're learning how to conjugate.
StCirq is offline  
Old Dec 7th, 2015, 09:13 AM
  #17  
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 17,802
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Saints preserve us, someone touched a nerve!

sandralist gives good advice and stands her ground. St Cirq provides humblebrags and rudeness. Anyone who doesn't venerate her for her life choices gets paragraphs of abuse, because it is of paramount importance to her to be seen as the reigning queen of France on this board.

<And you'll get a BA in French without being able to read, write, and converse fluently? That's a bit appalling.>
Offensive.
<Seems like the dress code is the least of your problems.>
Offensive.
< I don't know where you got all these silly ideas>
Offensive.

And the tone of your entire last paragraph is offensive. As is your attack on sandralist.
NewbE is offline  
Old Dec 7th, 2015, 09:24 AM
  #18  
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 1,668
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
jfgarner, I know how frustrating it can be to try to learn another language. (I took a short course in Italy.)

Our classes included many Europeans. I found that many of them, whether Dutch, German or Swiss-French, could converse in English when we were socializing. This was nice sometimes, but ultimately I realized that it was not helping me with my Italian. Try to seek out other serious students who are willing to practice with you in French without resorting to English.

You have such a wonderful opportunity--make the most of it and enjoy.
mama_mia is online now  
Old Dec 7th, 2015, 10:25 AM
  #19  
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 78,322
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
And you'll get a BA in French without being able to read, write, and converse fluently? That's a bit appalling.>

where in the heck do you see that she/he can't read or write French? I studied 3 years of French in college and could read and write quite well but when I went to France the first time they were just speaking too fast and too colloquially for me to understand much at all. Probably the case with the OP that St-Cirq so visciously attacked for not reading or writing any French even though St-cirq had absolutely no reason to say that - OP did not say it and since she got a BA in French I assume she writes and reads well as many French students do in American colleges but the emphasis is rarely on spoken French (so says my French son who tutors local French college students)- I think St-Cirq was downright rude and clueless and should apologize for jumping to conclusions.
PalenQ is offline  
Old Dec 7th, 2015, 10:27 AM
  #20  
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 78,322
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I didn't post one thing that was offensive.>

rather autistic too!
PalenQ is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Do Not Sell My Personal Information


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 12:59 AM.