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UK Fodorites, can you explain meaning of the phrase 'tuck-in'?

UK Fodorites, can you explain meaning of the phrase 'tuck-in'?

Sep 11th, 2007, 05:20 PM
  #1  
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UK Fodorites, can you explain meaning of the phrase 'tuck-in'?

Some friends of mine were recently in a restaurant and happened to run into Alan Rickman, the famous English actor. They didn't bug him for an autograph but obviously recognized him and smiled politely and nodded hello. When their food was being delivered, Mr. Rickman happened to be passing their table and he spoke briefly to them and said the expression, 'tuck in'. I loved the story because it sounded like he was a nice friendly guy, but I had never heard that expression before. I'm assuming that it is something akin to 'chow down' but I thought I'd ask those of you who have had experience with this phrase.
Dottee is offline  
Sep 11th, 2007, 05:26 PM
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I might be able to tell you if the two expressions are synonymous if I knew what "chow down" meant.
Padraig is online now  
Sep 11th, 2007, 05:32 PM
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"enjoy your meal".. but not quite as elegant!
lincasanova is offline  
Sep 11th, 2007, 05:43 PM
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Lol, Padreig! It means 'dig into your food' or perhaps, 'enjoy your meal'. I was just slightly confused when they told me that he had used that expression because I wasn't sure if they were saying that he wanted them to move closer to the table so he could pass...but then after thinking about it, I decided that he was probably expressing wishes for them to have an enjoyable meal.
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Sep 11th, 2007, 05:48 PM
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lincasanova, thanks for the explanation.
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Sep 11th, 2007, 05:55 PM
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'tuck in' means exactly the same as chow down... dig into you food.
highflyer is offline  
Sep 11th, 2007, 06:02 PM
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Hmmm - I don't quite know how to take this...
TuckH is offline  
Sep 11th, 2007, 07:24 PM
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I was just reading yk's report on her trip. I could probably smile politely and not bother both Brendan Fraser and Orlando Bloom (though both are pretty cute), but I would have to ask for an autograph from Alan Rickman. Might be because I'm 45...might be because I'm a HP fan and Snape is my favorite character--I can't read the books without picturing Alan Rickman as Snape. Don't know why exactly, but I would have to speak and express my appreciation if nothing else!
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Sep 11th, 2007, 08:14 PM
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Yes, Kellye, if you ever want to give me a birthday present, you'll never go wrong with Alan Rickman.

But you're much braver than me. I would freeze up and wouldn't be able to say a word. That's why I loved hearing from my friends about the lovely way that he treated them. And yes, they were completely charmed by him.
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Sep 12th, 2007, 12:51 AM
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I can't forget Alan Rickman as Obadiah Slope in the tv version of The Barchester Chronicles, and in the spoof sci-fi film Galaxy Quest, which we saw incompletely on three different flights in 2000.
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Sep 12th, 2007, 01:09 AM
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My explanation was only for "chow down" as i have NO idea what "tuck in" means.

lincasanova is offline  
Sep 12th, 2007, 01:18 AM
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'tuck in' means 'dig in, and enjoy your food'. A bit like saying 'bon appetit'. He was probably just trying to be friendly with you. Aw bless him
EnglishOne is offline  
Sep 12th, 2007, 02:57 AM
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'Tuck in' can mean; get close to the table, pull in your elbows and set to the meal. Tuck means to; pull in, take a tuck in a dress, tuck into bed. Mr. Rickman is using it as a metaphor.
GSteed is offline  
Sep 12th, 2007, 03:08 AM
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A tuck shop is a children's or schoolboys expression for a store selling sweets and other goodies. I'm sure Audere could tell us more!!!!
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Sep 12th, 2007, 03:25 AM
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It's often used in a friendly way to mean "start eating" - when someone politely hesitates at a dining table. In other words, a friendly way of saying get on with your meal and enjoy it. You can also "tuck into (or tuck away) a huge plate of food".
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Sep 12th, 2007, 03:31 AM
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"Tuck In" means eat up your meal and enjoy. In Australia Tucker means food.
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Sep 12th, 2007, 03:48 AM
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My Collins dictionary has definition 8 for "tuck" as (British informal) food, especially food and cakes, "tuck into" to eat heartily. "tuck shop", a shop, especially one near a school where cakes and sweets are sold.
Maria_H is offline  
Sep 12th, 2007, 03:50 AM
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...food and cakes, should have been sweets and cakes...

Just off to tuck into my lunch
Maria_H is offline  
Sep 12th, 2007, 04:13 AM
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I've heard that expression used in the US too, ever since I was a child.
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Sep 12th, 2007, 04:39 AM
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I'd also use it to mean making sure a shirt's tidily tucked in to one's trousers, or in making a bed. But it sounds odd as a suggestion to move closer to the table, in order to let someone pass - if that were meant, you'd start by saying "Would you mind...". In this context, definitely an encouragement to enjoy the meal.
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