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UK Fodorites, can you explain meaning of the phrase 'tuck-in'?

UK Fodorites, can you explain meaning of the phrase 'tuck-in'?

Sep 12th, 2007, 05:23 AM
  #21  
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jody, I wonder if it's a regional thing, then? I'm from Michigan originally and I've never heard it until last week. Just to be cute, I used it last night when I went out to dinner with six friends. They all looked at me with a puzzled expression. Of course they all think I'm sort of crazy anyway.
Dottee is offline  
Sep 12th, 2007, 05:29 AM
  #22  
 
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If "tuck" means something that requires exertion or using energy then that would explain the phrase "all tuckered out."
Dukey is offline  
Sep 12th, 2007, 05:42 AM
  #23  
 
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It's probably most famously used in the Philip Larkin poem This be The verse:

"They tuck you up, your mum and dad
They may not mean to but they do"
audere_est_facere is offline  
Sep 12th, 2007, 08:36 AM
  #24  
 
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Oh the good old days of popping down to the Tuck Shop to grab a Mars Bar or packet of Discos Better than smoking a *fag* (oohh errr Matron! Let the double entendres fly) behind the bike sheds anyway!
EnglishOne is offline  
Sep 12th, 2007, 09:17 AM
  #25  
 
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The British boarding school that I went to had a tuck shop. It was only opened during morning break (10.10 - 10.30am) and during lunch 12.00 - 2.00.
It sold all kinds of sweets and chocolates, pop (soda) and light snacks in a dazzling display, from a small counter in the doorway. Our favourite 'buys' as 8 year old kids were a packet of curried peas and an ice cream soda. Those were the days ! (the 70s)
Mathieu is offline  
Sep 12th, 2007, 09:24 AM
  #26  
 
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It's most commonly used in the U.S. in the context of, "Get into bed now! I'll be in soon to tuck you in!" Do they say this anywhere else?
Cimbrone is offline  
Sep 12th, 2007, 09:30 AM
  #27  
 
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English too. To tuck the kids into bed.

I had an aunt who used to specialise in tucking the sheets in so tight you couldn't move.
waring is offline  
Sep 12th, 2007, 09:31 AM
  #28  
 
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That's the only way I've heard it used in the US, also. I've never heard it used to mean start eating in the US, and I've lived in a variety of places throughout the US (Midwest, California, East Coast and Oklahoma).
Christina is offline  
Sep 12th, 2007, 09:35 AM
  #29  
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Yes, to 'tuck-in' where I grew up meant giving the little ones bedtime kisses, stories, and any other final comforts, but it had nothing to do with food.

Thanks for all the info, everyone. And since it is lunchtime, I think I'll go and tuck-in now. Cheerio!
Dottee is offline  
Sep 12th, 2007, 09:40 AM
  #30  
 
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Tucking is the action of pushing the sheets under the mattress, similarly as in to tuck your shirt in.

Again, your sheets, as well as your shirt, can be untucked.
waring is offline  
Sep 12th, 2007, 09:44 AM
  #31  
 
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Just don't eat so much that you end up being "tuckered out."
Dukey is offline  
Sep 12th, 2007, 09:51 AM
  #32  
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Thanks, Dukey! I'll try not to eat so much that I end up looking like Friar Tuck. (groan...and apologies)
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Sep 12th, 2007, 09:56 AM
  #33  
 
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>>a packet of curried peas and an ice cream soda<<

I hope teacher opened the window in the afternoon......
PatrickLondon is offline  
Sep 12th, 2007, 10:39 AM
  #34  
 
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Patrick, they were peas, not beans (deep fried until hard and crunchy, with salt and chili powder). Big gastro difference (to us anyway).
Mathieu is offline  
Sep 12th, 2007, 10:45 AM
  #35  
 
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I'm with you, jody. Although I've probably heard "dig in" used more often than "tuck in".
CAPH52 is offline  
Sep 12th, 2007, 11:04 AM
  #36  
 
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Might be that my family used tuck in meaning to eat because they are English and Irish.
jody is offline  
Sep 12th, 2007, 12:06 PM
  #37  
 
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audere... I think Larkin used a different spelling of 'tuck' in that poem.
highflyer is offline  
Sep 13th, 2007, 09:20 AM
  #38  
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That's funny, highflyer! Had to check back to the poem to see what you meant, though, she says blondly...

I also love the candy shop memories from our UK friends. Such a different world. The student store in our school carried the usual...Junior Mints and Whoppers and those plump little caramel things that stuck in your teeth. Nothing as exotic as curried peas!
Dottee is offline  

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