Train Prices

Sep 21st, 2009, 04:35 AM
  #1  
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Train Prices

I'm trying to get some idea of the difference between making two day trips to adjacent destinations or just stay the night (keeping our base hotel).

When I try to check train prices on Trenitalia, I only see prices for IC or ES trains but not for R trains.

Any idea how to find them?
Myer is offline  
Sep 21st, 2009, 05:21 AM
  #2  
 
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That's odd. I get prices for all types of trains, including regional trains. I had to press the "Next" button a few times to find a regional train between some cities.
colduphere is offline  
Sep 21st, 2009, 05:40 AM
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You have to enter a date within 7 days to get prices for all trains.
kybourbon is online now  
Sep 21st, 2009, 09:33 AM
  #4  
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kybourbon,
Thanks. That's the answer. Within 7 days.

And why are Raileurope prices so much more than those qioted on Trenitalia?

Profit?
Myer is offline  
Sep 21st, 2009, 09:45 AM
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And why are Raileurope prices so much more than those qioted on Trenitalia> exactly what are the prices on RE vs Trenitalia you've found - i have looked at several where RE was actually about the same as Trenitalia

Now if you are talking about Regional trains then i think there is a much bigger discrepancy because RE tacks on a service fee for each ticket - regardless of how much that ticket cost - thus for dirt-cheap regional trains it may be more skewed. But for ES trains i've seen it's not that much difference. Anyway for regional trains there is NO reason to buy your tickets in advance - tickets are good for any regional train and unlike ES type trains they are strictly based on the number of kilometers traveled i believe - and since they are dirt cheap i would not worry about finding the price if you cannot do it easily.
Palenque is offline  
Sep 21st, 2009, 09:48 AM
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RailEurope is a reseller selling the tickets of many different train companies. They tack on fees to provide this convenience to you and make money.

Trenitalia is the actual train company in Italy selling its own tickets.
ellenem is offline  
Sep 21st, 2009, 10:19 AM
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Profit. Some tickets they mark up almost double while others they only offer the more expensive flexible rate ones instead of the cheaper basic rate. They also tack on a hefty mailing fee, usually $15-$18. If you purchase directly from Trenitlia online, there is no mailing fee. You are issued a code you print out yourself.
kybourbon is online now  
Sep 21st, 2009, 10:56 AM
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If you purchase directly from Trenitlia online, there is no mailing fee.>

yes but untold furstrations if legions of fodorites complaining about Trenitalia.com are to be believed - like putting your credit card in and the transaction seemingly going thru and then no word for days, etc. Kybourbon, however is one of the very helpful Fodorites IME who will gladly help you thru the maze if you have problems - as she, and others, have helped untold dozens save money by nabbing the cheaper fares basically only available on Trenitalia.com - but for short distances and regional trains i would just wait until you got there rather than going thru a nightmare on Trenitalia.com. Again kybourbon and others will help you however IME if you have problems. The beauty of Fodor's IMO. In any case no need to go thru Raileurope for Italy tickets as whatever they are charging (plus S&H) you can easily buy once in Italy IME - the only reason to buy ahead IMO is to get the cheaper fares sold in restricted numbers first come first served. For regular fares and even AMICA i guess you can pick up in Italy at same prices. And there is absolutely no problem of getting on trains, etc. IME
Palenque is offline  
Sep 21st, 2009, 11:37 AM
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Actually, all of Trenitalia's regular online prices are supposed to be a 5% discount over walkup prices. Other Trenitalia discounts (as much as 60%)are limited first-come,first-serve. There have been recent threads about purchasing from Trenitalia using Paypal's virtual one-time use credit card.

http://www.fodors.com/community/euro...ir-website.cfm
kybourbon is online now  
Sep 21st, 2009, 11:39 AM
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Correction - The 5% discount online is just for faster trains.

Buying tickets and Travelcards online to travel on AV, AV Fast, ES*, ES* Fast and ES* City is cheaper!
The price of the high-band tickets is reduced by 5%* for tickets bought on-line, the Call Center (fee pay number) or at from travel agencies with the ticketless procedure.
kybourbon is online now  
Sep 22nd, 2009, 08:45 AM
  #11  
 
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kyboorbon - Travelcards? What are these, thanks again for your continued help deciphering the Byzantine Trenitalia system.

Myer says "And why are Raileurope prices so much more than those qioted on Trenitalia?

Profit?"

Yup Raileurope is a for-profit corporation and Trenitalia is bascially a perennial red-ink operation running huge defeceits i understand - whenever there is even a hint of a price increase in what are already Europe's cheapest rail fares IME there is a national uproar and politicians get involved. Yup Trenitalia can stay in business as a public utility that needs not apparently make any return on their operations profit wise but RailEurope cannot. (Not sure about recent years and Trenitalia profits but for decades was a perennial money loser, in part because of padding staff - the old men, no doubt relatives of someone in Trenitalia, that once traipsed thru train cars picking up bits of liter are long gone and perhaps a leaner operation means a better bottom line?
Palenque is offline  
Sep 22nd, 2009, 11:01 AM
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PQ - That was a copy/paste from Trenitlia's website. The Travelcards mentioned are for Italy residents, not Americans, but the 5% discount for purchasing is for anyone buying on their website.
kybourbon is online now  
Sep 22nd, 2009, 12:29 PM
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interesting you note only for Italians - i have heard reliable it seems reports that Trenitalia is thinking of making some of the discounts online for Italian residents only, under the same theory as the TravelCards only - why subsidize foreign travelers who will pay regular price? Hope it does not change but could i guess.
Palenque is offline  
Sep 22nd, 2009, 12:36 PM
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There have always been discounts for Italians only.
kybourbon is online now  
Sep 22nd, 2009, 12:55 PM
  #15  
 
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In Italy, the regionale trains are much much cheaper and more convenient. There is never a discount but so what? Buy the ticket at any station in the blue machine (use the English flag option). The prices on the trenitalia site seem to disappear for the regionales on the English version but never on the Italian one. There is not much difference except you use the Italian names of cities on the Italian site. You can't use the Trenitalia site to buy the ticket without an Italian tax code - you won't have your credit card accepted. If you buy IC or Eurostar tickets there are discounts available ahead of the day of the trip - and those discounts are at the window or the machine as well as the web site. Raileurope is not worth it unless they have access to a sale - so check it out. But the regionale is almost always still cheaper and usually more frequent and certainly is comfortable. The regionales vary in style but they are air conditioned and have lots of space - and much more luggage room- and you can take any seat. Just by a ticket that states the start and end. And then when you use it - STAMP IT in the yellow machine BEFORE YOU GET ON THE TRAIN. The conductors check this like hawks. If you buy reserved seats on the fancier trains, you have no chance to change it and you don't have to stamp it. But if the IC is three hours late (which can happen), you can't take a regionale instead. If the regionale is late, just take the next one. FWIW the regionales I saw were of two types: semi-express between two large cities, skipping many stops but making many with a short duration and ultra-locals that served the suburbs of cities. The semi-expresses were former long-distance coaches that had been completely renovated and air conditioned and were coverd with graffiti on the outside and had cracked paint. The local locals were new, low level trains that were specific commuter cars and were new and shiny.
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