St. Trophime

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Apr 14th, 2018, 08:11 AM
  #1
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St. Trophime

Does anyone know more about St. Trophime, that first Archbishop of Arles?

We brought back the red rice from Arles and made it today. Very nutty and delicious. It bgan during the Marshall Plan, when local farmers were encouraged to grow local products. Arles is a pretty run down town but with many attractions. Sorry, I cannot recommend the restaurants where we ate. Not bad, just not memorable.
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Apr 16th, 2018, 03:56 AM
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Sorry, don't know anything about St Trophime, but I do know this great recipe for red rice;

https://ottolenghi.co.uk/camargue-re...istachios-shop
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Apr 16th, 2018, 06:07 AM
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Thanks Tulip. We took a consesus of recipes and it worked out relatively well.
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Apr 16th, 2018, 09:22 PM
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Our eating experience in Arles, from my trip report:

We had some good meals in Arles, including home-cooked ones. Le Criquet was very good, with traditional cooking (67€ for two, a bourride and one menu plus wine) https://plus.google.com/113601407559...ut?gl=us&hl=en . A side note: the nearby Hotel le Calendal offers free computer access for the price of a cup of coffee for non-residents. Less memorable was the meal at le Bistrot à côté for 88€ including a 5€ supplement to the 29€ menu for lobster that was so-so. The restaurant gets very mixed reviews on Trip Advisor.

We liked Arles and used it as a base to visit the Camargue and the Provence west of the the Rhone.
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Apr 17th, 2018, 12:44 AM
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we look for places that are substantially less money. We found two in Nimes that were very good for a fraction of those restaurants in Arles. Back in NY we live in a great reastaurant neighborhood, but there will always be high priced dogs and low price finds.

Last edited by IMDonehere; Apr 17th, 2018 at 12:47 AM.
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Apr 17th, 2018, 08:37 AM
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It began during the Marshall Plan, when local farmers were encouraged to grow local products.

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Riz_rouge_de_Camargue.

According to the above article, rice production has a long history in the Camargue, starting with the reign of Henri IV. But this may have been only white rice. The museum in the Camargue explained that rice was used to lower the salinity of the fields, so that in the subsequent year, wheat could be grown in the same fields. Flooding the fields for growing rice pushed down the salinity in ground water. I don't recall if it was two years of wheat and one year of rice or vice versa.
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Apr 17th, 2018, 08:54 AM
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The red rice variety started under the Mstshall Plan and is grown by very few farmers.
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Apr 17th, 2018, 12:04 PM
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I don't know that he was an archbishop, but was a bishop.

It is thought he was a disciple of St Paul's who is mentioned in the Bible in the Acts of the Apostles who came to Provence to evangelise at the request of Peter and Paul.

https://nominis.cef.fr/contenus/sain...-Trophime.html
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Apr 17th, 2018, 01:52 PM
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Thank you Christina it is appreciated.
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