Go Back  Fodor's Forum > Destinations > Europe
Reload this Page > Sagrada Familia Dress Code & Photography
Notices

Sagrada Familia Dress Code & Photography

Reply

Sep 17th, 2016, 01:06 PM
  #1
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 86
Sagrada Familia Dress Code & Photography

Have our tickets for next week for Sagrada Familia. Looks like the temperature will still be in the mid 80s. We are taking a guided tour from Sagrada Familia and just wondered if Men can wear shorts into the various places of the tour? Capris seem like they will be okay for women, and a wrap to cover the shoulders if needed. Also, are you allowed to take pictures inside?
Thanks, Mary Ann
ReillyQ is offline  
Reply With Quote
Sep 17th, 2016, 01:46 PM
  #2
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 6,199
I was just there in March-- no issues with taking photos. Also, I THINK it actually hasn't been consecrated, or whatever the word is, so I don't think there are clothing restrictions.
elberko is online now  
Reply With Quote
Sep 17th, 2016, 01:48 PM
  #3
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 32,618
There is no dress police at any Catholic church I've ever been to in any country in Europe, including Spain. So yes, you can wear that in most of it, if you want to. I'm not sure what you plan to wear on top that you feel a wrap is necessary, but sounds good if you plan to wear very bare garments. The only place I've heard of such dress police is Italy (where I haven't been), particularly the Vatican. There are regulations at the Sagrada Familia for a part of it dedicated to prayer, though, (the Chapel of the Eucharist) which are no shorts, bare tops, swimsuits, plunging necklines, veyr short skirts, etc.

Take a look at the photo on the right on their own website, guys in shorts
http://www.sagradafamilia.org/en/benefits/

yes, you can take photos as long as they are personal, you aren't allowed to take ones for commercial purposes or use a tripod.

here are all the regulations if you want to read them
http://www.sagradafamilia.org/wp-con...CC%81lia-1.pdf
Christina is online now  
Reply With Quote
Sep 17th, 2016, 02:30 PM
  #4
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 564
If the Church has a problem with a perceived lack of modesty, why do they not bother cover all the half nude statues, including that of Jesus?

Jesus is always depicted shirtless. Why do we have to keep put shirt on?
Loacker is offline  
Reply With Quote
Sep 17th, 2016, 02:42 PM
  #5
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 86
Thank you Christina, the photo link was most helpful. I had been on their website, but after I read the code I was more concerned about my husband. If it turns out to be that warm, I was just going to wear a sleeveless top and planned to have a wrap handy if it was a problem for them.

It has been consecrated, I saw that somewhere, I think in 2013, but I know there is still a lot of construction.

Thanks again, now I can proceed with packing what I had planned.
Mary Ann
ReillyQ is offline  
Reply With Quote
Sep 17th, 2016, 03:27 PM
  #6
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 4,296
Sagrada Familia was consecrated by Pope Benedict XVI in 2010: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-11705036
Generally, Spanish churches are less restrictive about attire than Italy, and unless you are clearly inappropriately dressed, like in a bikini, you are unlikely to face restrictions. I have seen many Spaniards, esp younger people, in shorts attending Mass in Spain.
Alec is offline  
Reply With Quote
Sep 17th, 2016, 05:50 PM
  #7
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 57,640
C -

Sorry, there are a number of churches in Italy, including the Vatican, that have strict dress policies for modesty of adult visitors. They want knees and upper arms/bosoms covered for women. And the Swiss Guard will turn people away.
nytraveler is offline  
Reply With Quote
Sep 18th, 2016, 04:10 AM
  #8
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 10,168
Someone must have stirred the mud because Loacker is here again commenting on matters clerical, something about which she or he has neither knowledge nor understanding.

Loacker, to really ring your chimes, go to Ravenna where many of the very early mosaics show Jesus not only with a bare chest but with a penis, as well He should since Christians regard Him as both fully human and fully divine. We are a namby-pamby age; the 7th Century was more theologically correct.

Aggressive atheism and anti-clericalism were very popular in the late Victorian age among the literati and would-be literati, but I thought people had gotten over it. Maybe it is a reaction to fundamentalism, but leave it to others with more education and better brains to carry on the battle.
Ackislander is offline  
Reply With Quote
Sep 18th, 2016, 04:52 AM
  #9
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 564
Where did you see any aggression? I think I made a valid point.

Catholics impose a certain dress code on church visitors, while they adorns their basilicas and cathedrals with naked statues and frescoes. Kinda odd, dontcha think?
Loacker is offline  
Reply With Quote
 



Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 10:00 AM.