Quad room in Paris

Old Jan 25th, 2012, 10:52 AM
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Quad room in Paris

Looking to rent a large room/suite for four nights in Paris in June for a family of four with two teenage girls. Tried Millésime on Rue Jacob but it's not available for the necessary dates. Any suggestions for something under 400euro per night? It's their first visit to Paris so location and front desk is important.
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Old Jan 25th, 2012, 11:02 AM
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Did you try a search here on 'Paris Quad hotel'?
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Old Jan 25th, 2012, 11:03 AM
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The Hôtel Duquesne has a quad room with a view of the Tour Eiffel.
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Old Jan 25th, 2012, 11:04 AM
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With 2 teen girls and 400 euros I would definitely go for 2 rooms instead. We always did that with our girls and it worked much better than squeezing everyone into 1 room - and 1 bath.
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Old Jan 25th, 2012, 11:05 AM
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Would they consider two rooms? I just looked at the Relais Bosquet and they could have two rooms for about that price. They should consider emailing any hotels they are interested in to see if they could get a further discount for two rooms if a quad room isn't available.

An extra bathroom would be a nice advantage with two teenagers!
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Old Jan 25th, 2012, 11:05 AM
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One of the most comprehensive lists of Quad rooms I have seen:

http://www.tripadvisor.com/ShowTopic...de_France.html
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Old Jan 25th, 2012, 11:49 AM
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Thanks for the suggestions. I did find the quad room thread before posting but it's over four years old so I wondered if anyone had any more recent experiences. I'd prefer nice space for four, instead of two rooms, since the girls are young teens and still like sitting around and talking to their parents. My sister would also rest easier if she had everyone in sight.
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Old Jan 25th, 2012, 11:55 AM
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The girls would not be allowed into the parents' room for talking? Does your sister rest easier when the girls are using the toilet or does she need to watch them?

I am feeling queasy about the family situation if the needs are that radical.
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Old Jan 25th, 2012, 11:57 AM
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The du Danube on Rue Jacob just down fro, the Millesime has quad rooms
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Old Jan 25th, 2012, 12:02 PM
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I don't think there is any need to insult the family, my parents were uncomfortable allowing me and my sister to have a room by ourselves when we were young, this isn't crazy. And it wasn't just because they were afraid we would sneak out, they worried about safety. We tended to stay in motels, however (on family road trips), which are less secure but still.. These are young teens, it isn't crazy to not want them staying in a hotel room by themself. And, while this isn't a safety issue, sometimes teens get out of control when left alone (with noise) and hotels don't want kids left alone in hotel rooms, either (some won't even allow it, I think).

However, what should be advised (and the OP may not have thought of) is that some hotels that may advertise "quads" really do have two rooms but they are connecting, so that would be ideal. I know one that does, I stayed there and liked it a lot, you should check it out -- the Hotel Trianon Rive Gauche, great location in the Latin Qtr/St Germain
http://www.paris-hotel-trianon.com/
They have 2 connecting rooms for 4 people for only 271 euro in June.

Very nice hotel, good front desk.
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Old Jan 25th, 2012, 12:36 PM
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I am not insulting the family. I am asking questions. If your parents were neurotic, Christina, that is your own family history. I am trying figure out the needs of this new family and the reasons for them.
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Old Jan 25th, 2012, 03:20 PM
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I don't think it is "neurotic" for parents to not leave young teens alone in a hotel room. I would hope it would be the norm. Nice of you to continue your insults with my family now, not just the OP.
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Old Jan 25th, 2012, 03:21 PM
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kerouac: << Does your sister rest easier when the girls are using the toilet or does she need to watch them?

I am feeling queasy about the family situation if the needs are that radical.>>

That's not an insult, huh?
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Old Jan 25th, 2012, 04:13 PM
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Moving past the digressions (for the moment, anyway), I'm not sure what you mean by "front desk" being important, since there's a variety of ways to interpret that!

We've found Room "A" at the Hotel Aiglon (aka L'Aiglon) in the Montparnasse area perfect. It has 2 bedrooms & 2 bathrooms, and when we're a group of 4, it's a good deal and we don't have to fight for the bathroom.

The Metro (Raspail) is directly across the street, next to the cemetery, and the BEST bus in Paris (Bus 68) traveling past the Musee d'Orsay, Saint-Germain des Près, the Seine, The Louvre, and the Opéra Garnier.

The literary restaurants -- Le Dome, La Rotonde, Le Select and La Coupole are within walking distance, as are the wonderful little Breton creperies on rue de Montparnasse (not to be confused with the boulevard of the same name.

And thank you for reminding me -- I just booked it for our trip this summer!

Now, going back to the subject of two rooms, there are some hotels and some cities in which there is a maximum of 2 persons to a room, making it a little difficult when you have kids in tow. In Copenhagen that was the rule, so our (then) 12 year old son had his own room with an adjoining door. Many of the hotels have this feature where the maximum is 2.

I do understand the comfort level issue, and it's a personal issue, as well as a personal decision. It can also be a legal issue -- there are some places and some hotels where there MUST be at least one adult in a room. Some young teens one wouldn't hesitate to allow the independence of a separate room if allowed; others, not such a great idea. The parent hopefully knows best. If a family is going with young people to a foreign country where they don't speak the language and its the first time where they are unsure of the general safety of the area or the hotel, that plays into the comfort level issue.
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Old Jan 25th, 2012, 06:02 PM
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My goodness this forum can get opinionated. I only suggested two rooms as they are sometimes easier to find. However, I totally understand the preference for a quad room and hope the OP can find a good one.
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Old Jan 26th, 2012, 01:27 AM
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Someone questioned the OP's wanting a good front desk, and I hadn't seen an explanation forthcoming.

For a first time visit to a foreign country I find the services that a good concierge provide most helpful. One tends to forget all the unforeseen questions, concerns and insecurities a first time visit can produce. People react to being in a foreign environment differently and sometimes in unexpected ways. Having a front desk that speaks your language and is willing to help you can make a huge difference in how enjoyable your stay is, not only at the hotel but in that city.

As to quads...the hotel we use for quads is below your expectations and budget. The Hotel St. André des Arts in the 6th has at least 3 quad rooms, but no elevator or extra services. Quads go for around 120 euros (haven't looked recently) and we prefer the one with shower vs. bath tub, but it's one floor higher walk. The location is great but the rooms are on the street side, so will be noisier, especially on weekends. Breakfast is inlcuded in the price but is quite simple. Front desk is helpful but isn't that warm-gushy style that some, especially Americans, equate with good service. Inexpensive Bohemian style hotel with great metro access. Not for those who expect pristeen modernity or lavish surroundings. Works for us.

We've also stayed at a Holiday Inn in Paris that had, as others suggested, 2 double rooms behind one entrydoor. You could lock the main door and then leave the doors to the 2 rooms open all the time if you wanted (like if you had small children) It was in the Bibliotheque Nationale area, but that wouldn't be my preference for a first time visit.
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Old Jan 26th, 2012, 03:55 AM
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Aside from the "front desk" issue, why are't you considering an apartment? Most apartments want a weekly rental but you can find some that have a 3/4 night minimum stay. Then everyone can be in the same place with a lot more space to move about, living room, two bathrooms, kitchen etc. Generally an apartment will be less expensive than two rooms in a hotel. Your apartment owner will be able to answer your questions or let you know where to go with questions once in Paris. We find an apartment much more comfortable than a hotel room.
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Old Jan 26th, 2012, 05:13 AM
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I think two adjoining rooms would work better, although I can understand the parents' viewpoint too. So why not get two adjoining rooms with a connecting door and simply keep the connecting door open? The family gets the benefits of extra space and two bathrooms and the parents can still see what their daughters are up to.
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Old Jan 26th, 2012, 06:26 AM
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Again, thanks for the suggestions. We stay in apartments but I think a hotel is simpler for a short first stay for novice travelers. There are fewer things that can go wrong and they'll enjoy having someone else making the beds. Adjoining rooms is a great idea. I hadn't thought of that as a distinct room type.

Dearest kerouac, I <i>so</i> appreciate your queasy concern. Rest easy. I'm off to call the girls to tell them that, based upon your remarkable insight, their dream trip to Paris and Rome has morphed into a summer of extensive family therapy sessions.
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Old Jan 26th, 2012, 06:47 AM
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klondike2 -- thanks for the front desk response. That makes a lot of sense. I was unsure if it meant there was a front desk (some places don't have them), if it was open all night, or if someone spoke English, or if it meant assisting like a concierge.
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