Pronunciation

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Apr 16th, 2014, 11:20 AM
  #1
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Pronunciation

Wow, two month from yesterday and we will be in Ireland. I am so ready.

On of the things I would appreciate knowing is how to pronounce some of the place names, so if you could help me with the following, I would be appreciative (my thoughts are in parenthesis):

Sligo (Slee-go)
Oughterard (Oo-ter-ard)
Mweelrea (Mm-well-ree-ah)
Croagh (Cro-ah)
Illaunonearaun (Ill-ow-non-eer-an)
Looscaunagh (Loos-can-aw)
Cashel (is it cash-el or ca-shel)

Thanks!
krejaton is offline  
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Apr 16th, 2014, 11:22 AM
  #2
 
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i can help you with one - it's Sli-go as in eye.

oh yes, and it's Ca-shel.

no idea about the rest.
annhig is offline  
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Apr 16th, 2014, 11:27 AM
  #3
 
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You could use a text to speech site. Here's one.

http://www.naturalreaders.com/index....FYc7Ogod92IA9w
adrienne is offline  
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Apr 16th, 2014, 11:35 AM
  #4
 
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So far the text to speech website mentioned has it wrong 50% of the time for Irish places. Must test more.
onetwo is offline  
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Apr 16th, 2014, 11:41 AM
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Make it 80% wrong. Don't use that one.
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Apr 16th, 2014, 11:43 AM
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Good to know. There are other sites.
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Apr 16th, 2014, 11:51 AM
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Och-ter-ard
Crow
I have only ever heard Cashel pronounced cash-el, emphasis on 1st syllable.
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Apr 16th, 2014, 12:52 PM
  #8
 
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To be perfectly honest just say it how you think.. The same place can be called half a dozen different similarities depending on the local accent of the Irish person talking..

Assuming you are staying in B&B/Guesthouse accommodation ask your host if you are saying it right.
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Apr 16th, 2014, 01:29 PM
  #9
 
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I know it shouldn't bother me, but it irks me a little when people mispronounce the simpler place-names. It's easier for me to be tolerant with some of the more difficult ones, like several in this list. I commend you, krejaton, for wanting to get things as right as possible. I hope this helps (stressed syllables in upper case):
- Sligo: SLY-go
- Oughterard: OOCH-ther-AWRD
- Mweelrea: MWEEL-ray
- Croagh: CROKE
- Illaunonearaun: ill-AWN-on-AIR-awn
- Looscaunagh: LOOS-cawn-och
- Cashel: CASH-el
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Apr 16th, 2014, 01:38 PM
  #10
 
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PS: The "ch" sound I had in mind is not as in "cheese"; it's more like a softened "k" sound. Think of a gentle clearing of the throat.
Padraig is offline  
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Apr 16th, 2014, 01:38 PM
  #11
 
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I agree with Tony2phones. It's pointless to try and get it right.

Take the well known Glasgow, Scotland for an example of what at first blush most people would say they know how to pronounce but how a Glaswegian from the Gorbals pronounces it is nothing like how someone from a more 'upmarket' area of the city would.

I grew up in Toronto, Canada. We pronounce it 'tronno'. If you pronounce it 'tore on toe' do you think I care? No one cares.

The funny thing about 'Tronno' is that the US Customs at the border know the difference. When we used to drive over to Buffalo, NY to drink beer at age 18 (was legal there but not in Ontario at that time), when they'd ask, 'where were you born?', Everyone who was born in Toronto would say 'Tronno' and those of use who were immigrant kids knew to say 'Tronno' as well. LOL

Answering 'Tor-on-to' told them you were lying about your birthplace.
dulciusexasperis is offline  
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Apr 16th, 2014, 02:14 PM
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Ur not a Chonnacht man then Padraig
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Apr 16th, 2014, 03:15 PM
  #13
 
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I speak Connacht Irish, Tony. In Munster, the "ch" is a less gentle clearing of the throat, and in Ulster the "ch" is almost like the English (or American) "h".
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Apr 17th, 2014, 02:29 AM
  #14
 
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The reason I didn't buy the land my grandfathers farm stood on just outside Spiddal was because they insisted on me speaking the Chonnacht Irish.. (Haven't done that since my father beat it out of me) I do know a couple of bars where folk sit in their separate groups because they don't understand what the others are talking about.. and no one around here understands my broad Yorkshire Irish
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Apr 17th, 2014, 06:48 AM
  #15
 
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Have a look at this video 'Californians on Ireland'. I like the part where they point to Ireland on a map of Europe.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0XWAuoGg4jY
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Apr 17th, 2014, 08:23 PM
  #16
 
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Where is it again? I just get on the plane and get off wherever it leaves me. : )
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