PayPal is danderous

Old Apr 20th, 2006, 09:56 AM
  #41  
esm
 
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PayPal is useless when you want to "dispute" a charge.

I bought an item on Ebay and it was clearly not as described. I contacted the seller and he/she agreed to refund my money. I sent the item back and never heard from the seller. I was lucky that I paid for this with a credit card. PayPal had a thousand different rules and a time limit. I gave up on them and contacted my credit card company. One phone call and one form to fill.

I also received many bogus emails and sent them to EBay and PayPal. They can't keep up with assorted crooks who use their logo to scam people.
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Old Apr 20th, 2006, 10:22 AM
  #42  
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esm, Robespierre's experience would seem to refute that idea. Clearly he sold something that the buyer (alright, a buyer's representative) was unhappy with and they went back and took the money back from him.

Incidentally, I always ignored those scam emails that looked like PayPal or Ebay asking for personal information. One day I get an email that I think really was from them telling me that they would never send an email without including my actual name. Sure enough, within a week I got a very official email seemingly from them that included my name. I called them and found that no this too was a bogus one. The crooks sure manage to keep up with how to improve their scams.
 
Old Apr 20th, 2006, 10:42 AM
  #43  
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Neo, I realize that they took money from Rob and it seems a third party was involved as well (he says they took money from his account and gave it to someone else). I don't know all the facts in his case.

I have never sold anything on EBay but continue to buy and now only pay with a credit card.

In my case, I had already bid and bought a second item from the seller. As soon as I received the first item and knew it was not what it was supposed to be, I emailed to let the seller know I was not satisfied and wanted to return it. He/she agreed and I returned the item. The seller then sent me an email saying he would be traveling and told me he'd send the second item (which was cheaper) and refund the rest. I had no choice (and no reason to suspect him) so I agreed and never heard back.

So I notified PayPal and EBay about the situation and they kept sending me emails urging me to resolve the matter with the seller. This was despite the fact that I explained the sequence of events and provided all the communication with the seller. I just got tired of all this. I think they only give you 2 weeks for reporting a dispute.

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Old Apr 20th, 2006, 01:57 PM
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Ebay and paypal just scare me sometimes; I usually look at people's comments like a hawk before I do a transaction with them--and I've only sold 2 maybe 3 things. But I am relieved (in a small way) to see that Robespierre's bad experience was related to a transaction he had made and Paypal isn't randomly taking money from people (though that doesn't mean they were in the right).

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Old Apr 20th, 2006, 02:39 PM
  #45  
 
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In practical terms, what's the difference?
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Old Apr 20th, 2006, 02:45 PM
  #46  
 
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Well.. I don't have to worry daily that paypal might just take my money out for no reason.

You seem to be at a greater risk if you sell items.. and I don't really do that much.. so I feel safer.
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Old Apr 20th, 2006, 02:48 PM
  #47  
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Robespierre, you can't see the difference in their taking money out of buyer or seller's account at random and taking back the money paid because of a buyer filing a complaint (even it was for another person who ended up buying the product from her)? I know personal experience can shade your perspective, but surely you can see the difference.
 
Old Apr 20th, 2006, 04:01 PM
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I said "in practical terms." That means that the circumstances don't matter if the end result is that you get screwed. Is English your native language?
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Old Apr 20th, 2006, 04:41 PM
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I want to have sympathy JandaO but there has been so much written about PHISHING over the last couple of years it would be impossible not to have noticed.

Would you give personal information over the phone if someone called you and said they were with PayPal or your bank? NO. You never give information to anyone unless you are the one initiating the phone call. Same thing with emails. It takes 2 seconds to "cut and paste" a logo from any bank or company into an email.
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Old Apr 20th, 2006, 05:03 PM
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Pay Pal and Ebay are great until you have a problem. It is next to impossible to talk to someone to solve the problem quickly.

Last year I spent 30 or 40 hours trying to save my $200. I will never do business with either again.

If someone steals $200 from my home I call 911 and I have help in five or ten minutes. With PayPal or Ebay you send e-mails for two or three months with no results. I then called my credit card company, e-mailed them all the information and they got the money out of PayPal for me. The people are not customer friendly when it comes to problems.
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Old Apr 20th, 2006, 05:17 PM
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"It takes 2 seconds to "cut and paste" a logo from any bank or company into an email."

True - but the truly <b>great</b> phishes take you to a web site that looks and acts like the real thing. They even contrive phony domain names like https://ebay.ef2.com that's actually in some scumbag's garage in Kiev.

And while we're on the subject, don't even click on links that look legitimate, such as http://www.ebay.com, because there could be literally <i>any</i> URL behind the clickable text. And once you send an HTTP request to a server by sending a request to it, anything can happen, and most of it not good.
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Old Apr 20th, 2006, 06:28 PM
  #52  
 
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I've never had a problem with PayPal, over many, many years - the problem is with PHISHING, which is not unique to PayPal - also AOL, ChaseBank, Ebay, and so on.

Each and every payment sort of website with which you sign up does warn against phony e-mails and tell you how to recognize same (your name is not included, for example).

For sure, they all look official...

All in all, NONE of these services EVER request that you provide personal information in response to any e-mail.

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Old Apr 20th, 2006, 06:46 PM
  #53  
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OK, I guess death at age 4 and death at age 90 are &quot;for all practical terms&quot; the same thing. And death from brain cancer is &quot;for all practical terms&quot; the same as shooting oneself. English is my native language but there are some things that put into those terms are still hard for me to grasp. They probably always will be.

Your statement followed someone's post that PayPal retracting money from a seller's account because of an unhappy customer was at least better than just taking money randomly from someone. Naturally I thought your statement was an attempt to refute that idea. Now I see it wasn't.
 
Old Apr 21st, 2006, 05:47 AM
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Neo, in all practical terms yes -- they are all dead. That's what he means, the end result is the same, no matter what the reason or timing of the matter is.
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Old Apr 21st, 2006, 06:08 AM
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Janda - I got them too and my husband luckily was around when I saw them. He was like, &quot;NO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!&quot; cause he had read about the scam.

The logo part is scary. There was a similiar phishing scam around MSN asking for info. MSN sent an email and said if the email had their logo, it was from them but they never would ask for info via email. Still, you cant trust anything i guess and its really aggravating to know there are so many creepy people out there
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Old Apr 21st, 2006, 06:50 AM
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&quot;MSN sent an email and said if the email had their logo, it was from them...&quot;

One begins to wonder what the total IQ at MSN might be. As pointed out above, <u>any</u>one can stick <u>any</u>thing in an email. Here's an MSN logo:

http://hp.msn.com/global/c/lg/msft94.gif
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Old Apr 21st, 2006, 02:51 PM
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Aggie phishing:

Dear sir or madame . . please write you bank account numbers and passwords on a note and leave it on the front porch . . I will drop by in the morning and collect it . .

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