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Osteria vs Trattoria?

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Jan 29th, 2004, 05:13 AM
  #1
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Osteria vs Trattoria?

Hello

Can anyone give guidance on the difference between food, ambiance, cost etc of a Venetian osteria in comparison to a trattoria?

Thank you.
SallyB is offline  
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Jan 29th, 2004, 05:52 AM
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I think a trattoria is a casual place for lunch and dinner? I know a osteria is more like a bar that serves wine and beer. We happened upon a osteria in Venice and ran in (w/kids) for a before dinner drink and we were able to get light appetizers-in this place served as bite size servings. It was a great little place very casual with many locals.
vino is offline  
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Jan 29th, 2004, 05:58 AM
  #3
ira
 
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Hi sally,

Excellent question

"Definition of Trattoria - family owned, casual, rustic neighborhood restaurants found throughout all of Italy that serve fresh, unassuming, conventional local fare".

I think that an osteria is a trattoria with tablecloths (or maybe it is the reverse).

I think that both can be considered bistros.
ira is online now  
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Jan 29th, 2004, 06:25 AM
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Osterie are wine bars that have evolved to serve simple meals. Traditionally, they are even simpler than trattorie and usually have no menu. The offering changes daily, according to the market and two or three courses are offered for a fixed price, including wine. Sometimes there will be a choice or two for each course. These distinctions don't mean a lot in Italy anymore as many trattorie and even restaurants call themselves "osteria" or "hosteria" and vice versa.
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Jan 29th, 2004, 06:34 AM
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I agree with Grinisa. Those old definitions of the terms don't stand up any more. In fact I've seen places put out a sign that says "Ristorante" which should mean full service restaurant, and found that they were nothing more than a sort of cafeteria style wine bar.

Remember when Cafe or Tavern meant casual small meals in the US? Now look what we have -- Grammercy Tavern and Union Square Cafe are two great examples of what ISN'T in a name.
Patrick is offline  
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Jan 29th, 2004, 06:40 AM
  #6
ira
 
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>Osterie are wine bars that have evolved to serve simple meals.<

OK.

So, what is the difference between and osteria and an enoteca?
ira is online now  
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Jan 29th, 2004, 06:47 AM
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Traditionally, enoteca served no food; they were just a place to go and drink wine. Italians on the whole are not big drinkers, so it is, or was, rare to find a "bar" or "tavern" that we here in the USA are used to seeing. People would stop into an enoteca for a glass of wine on the way to another spot for a full meal. Now, most enoteca serve light appetizers too and some, Cul de Sac comes to mind, serve full meals. Just another example how these distinctions have become blurred.
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Jan 29th, 2004, 07:11 AM
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Nice work, Grinisa.

Yes, the titles have little meaning these days and some of the business names have lasted through generations. But, leave it to Grinisa to know her history.

Ira, have you ever been to Italy?
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