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New experience for me! 1 month Euro solo trip!

New experience for me! 1 month Euro solo trip!

Old Sep 22nd, 2022, 02:49 AM
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New experience for me! 1 month Euro solo trip!

Hello everyone from CANADA! I have travelled quite a bit, but it was always with family or friends. But soon, that is about to change.

I am a black 27 year old male embarking on a whole month solo trip in Europe. I will be visiting 4 countries: Munich Germany, Warsaw Poland, Copenhagen Denmark and Zagreb Croatia. I will be spending a week in each city, from October 24th-November 23rd.



Except for Copenhagen, I will be staying at an Airbnb (staying at the NH collection in Copenhagen).



My goal in this trip: Lots of walking, (I loove to walk), nightclub once or twice in each destination, and shopping (Germany or Copenhagen only, not both)

I have a few questions to help have a smooth trip!


  1. What should my budget be for each country? So far, I have CAD 2,500 saved. Do I need more or less?
  2. Speaking of what I have saved, itís all in my Mastercard. Do I need to use cash in any of these countries? All I have is my Mastercard, and my debit card (RBC and Tangerine).
  3. Any apps I should install immediately in any of these countries, whether it is from transportation, shopping, restaurants, etc?
  4. Is there an app **specifically** for grocery delivery? Does that even exist?
  5. Any restaurants I should DEFINITELY checkout for a nice solo breakfast/dinner?
  6. I love to powerlift and go to the gym. For those fitness people out there, any cheap and good gyms to check-out in any of these countries?
  7. Sightseeing: In all of these cities, I am staying in the downtown area. Are there any major tours I should keep my eyes out for?
  8. Dress code: What should I definitely bring with me in terms clothing, for casual day to day walking, changes in weather, as well as going out and meeting people? For example, are my winter Palladium/Timbs needed? Or my heavy Mackage coat?
  9. Any decent nightclubs to checkout?
  10. Vaccinations, packing, forms etc, anything I need to know about that?
yaseenel5083 is offline  
Old Sep 22nd, 2022, 12:11 PM
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3) Rome2Rio gives the broadest transport option overviews (bus, taxi, uber, walking, etc.) - - though if you pull up bus schedules they are not always accurate, so you need to go to the local transport agency. The very best thing is to download the local transport company app for each city - - not only do they provide the widest range of detailed transport choices, but they now tend to have "real time" listings of individual busses - - so if the bus is behind schedule, you'll see the schedules in 'real time'.

3 & 4) Google Maps (and just plain Google) is really the go-to for finding anything (and can also very much worth checking for bus/transport schedules/directions in addition to Rome2Rio). You can simply type in "grocery stores near me" and it will show you a map with options all over each city. You can try the same for "grocery delivery" - - just be aware that the first things you see will be paid/promoted sites, so you should scroll past anything listed as an ad so get to the more neutral search results.

7) Check out tourist busses (often double-deckers) that do specific routes in cities to give you a broad touristic overview; Google or go to Tripadvisor for walking tours (often on particular themes); Google 'self-directed walking tours'; go to Tripadvisor and check for tour options within each city.

8) Layers.
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Old Sep 22nd, 2022, 01:01 PM
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What does that money have to cover? Lodging? Food? Transportation (local and from country to country)?Tickets to museums, nightclubs, etc? Airfare? Have you checked that yet?
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Old Sep 22nd, 2022, 01:04 PM
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#4. I can only speak for myself, of course, but as a well-traveled often solo traveler for almost 60 years, I’d consider having groceries delivered a deprivation. My favorite stores to browse & get a bit of insight into the lives of the people whose home I’m visiting are grocery & hardware stores. Besides, how will you know what to order if you don’t visit the store to know what they have? So from my perspective you’ll give yourself a gift by going to grocery stores for nice long browsing to find what you know you’ll like and also to try things you’ve never seen before.



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Old Sep 22nd, 2022, 01:21 PM
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Sounds like a great trip.

I never even use a smartphone in Europe so don't think you would have to have apps at all, But I really don't know why you'd need one immediately. The only main ones I can think of you might need would be for the rail systems, though. Or maybe for your airline, but presumably you wouldn't need me to tell you that. But train apps are now used for a lot of things. So you could make sure to install that and that it's working.

Some people use Uber, I never do, but if you do, you already have that app.

I agree with MmePedu on the shopping. Why would you want to have groceries delivered ? I wouldn't book an Airbnb in a place that isn't near a grocery store, if that's your reasoning, that you couldn't possibly walk to one and carry stuff back as it would be too far. Consider the environment of the choice of having everything delivered for no reason. I could see it for someone quarantining, of course. If by some bad luck you get very sick and have to stay in, I'm sure the manager of where you are staying can tell you about that possibility and the name.

I would hope you are already vaccinated and up to date with your boosters. You should have proper documentation of that on your smartphone always, even at home. I do.

I think you have to check online for gyms near where you are staying. I don't know the names in those cities, but where I have stayed a long time, there was never one name used in the entire country as far as I know. And the best is the most convenient to where you are staying.

You can get local cash from a cash distributor machine using your debit card. If you don't already know, find out you bank's fees for that, if any. I don't know if you've traveled outside Canada before to know if it works ok. And I don't know those banks, maybe someone else will.
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Old Sep 22nd, 2022, 02:33 PM
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Just quickly on the topic of cash/debit cards etc, contact RBC and Tangerine and ask if they have any European banks they have agreements with - for example I bank with Scotiabank and they have an agreement with BNP Paribas in France and Italy so I don't pay any ATM fees when I take money out there. I'm sure at least RBC must have a similar arrangement.
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Old Sep 22nd, 2022, 06:19 PM
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Regarding budget, what must that amount cover - does it include costs of airfare, lodging, intercity transport? How will you travel between cities, and in what order? Copenhagen will likely be the most expensive city on your itinerary. For nights out, keep in mind that in European clubs alcoholic drinks tend to be quite expensive, beer and wine cheaper.

As for apps - your airline, uber, your bank, documentation of your COVID vaccination status (at least photo of vaccination cards if unable to find an app.) WhatsApp is popular everywhere and a good, inexpensive way to make calls/texts. You may want to also download a currency converter app.

Your MasterCard should be welcomed just about everywhere, but cash may be necessary for small purchases, vending machines, etc. You can always just get a bit of local currency from an ATM, but as suggested check with your bank about what fees apply and whether they have cooperative agreements with banks in your destinations. Do keep in mind that when using credit card you should ALWAYS decline to be charged in your home currency - the so-called dynamic currency conversion scheme - and insist on being charged in the local currency.

As previously recommended, your best bet is to plan on wearing layers that can be donned/doffed as needed. The trend of wearing all black all the time has passed, but keep it to a couple colors that mix and match well. Jeans are fine just about everywhere. Since you are likely to have to hit a laundromat while traveling, pack only easy to launder items.

Lastly, absolutely agree that hitting local supermarkets is a great way to get a sense of the local culture. If there are farmer's markets available, that's always great, too.

Bon voyage!!
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Old Sep 22nd, 2022, 07:03 PM
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Sounds delightful. Solo traveler for 60 years, female. Have been to all but Poland. I usually spend 5-7 days in a city but do close by excursions at least 1-2 days but I pack my days full.

Copenhagen: LOTS of bikes, so that might interest you in terms of getting around. Zagreb: relatively small city, getting around is easy and walkable, trams are great.

2) need cash for incidentals, snacks, food truck food, daily markets, etc. You should figure out a budget as Croatia does not use the euro, so you would not want to change too much money for Zagreb.
8) I would do a parallel tracking of weather where I live and the places I am visiting. You can see if they are similar or much different that where you live. I would start now as depending on where you live in Canada could be much colder than Europe in Nov/Dec and you need your temps now for when it gets to that temp in Europe.
I travel in Europe in the month of November and to me it is lovely for a heavy sweater or light coat, light gloves (rarely). Rain--sure it rained on my trips in 60 years maybe 10 times, 6-7 times at night. I have been extremely lucky.
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Old Sep 23rd, 2022, 04:40 AM
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not just going to stores, but going to local market is a wonderful experience, you can often eat in markets and if your languages don't gel perfectly take your time and smile (but at lunch rush hour you might just be seen as a pest)
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Old Sep 23rd, 2022, 05:35 AM
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You will almost certainly need some cash, and you have managed to choose four countries with four different currencies so be careful you aren't left with a load of cash you can't spend.
What order are you visiting these countries which are pretty spread out, and how are you getting between them?
Does your budget have to cover that travel?
Go shopping! You don't need a delivery service, and anyway probably would find one that easily in most of those places, why spend extra on a delivery service when you are clearly on a tight budget?
Learn some basic food words in each language to help you shop, or use a translator app.
Does your phone service allow data usage in Europe without it costing you an arm and a leg?

Have you looked at the tourist information sites for these cities? You will get a lot of useful info from them, often including nightlife.
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Old Sep 26th, 2022, 07:36 AM
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We've just returned from Split. Croatia is joining the Ä on January 1 2023, and most places will already accept euros in payment. There is a fixed exchange rate, which leads to some odd prices in euros (Ä7.10, for instance.) Any euros left over from Germany can probably be spent in Zagreb. However, it's a good rule not to withdraw too much local currency, and try to use credit cards where possible.

I was surprised that many places accepted cash only. In Italy ( where I live) credit cards can't refused.
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Old Sep 28th, 2022, 05:37 AM
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At that time of year, be equipped to go outside with proper gear for your head and feet. Your hat should be warm and repel rain ( buy a nice scarf to go with the hat.) Your shoes should be water-repellant as well as warm. Wet cold feet can chill your day.
You have had lots of advice about money. Getting cash from an ATM operated by a bank is wise but why waste time searching for a particular bank to save a few dollars fee. And don't expect that debit card to be useful for over-the- counter purchases, as you might do back in Canada. Even if it is accepted, your bank back home will charge a foreign-exchange fee. Cash for small purchases, credit card for large.
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Old Sep 28th, 2022, 06:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Southam View Post
At that time of year, be equipped to go outside with proper gear for your head and feet. Your hat should be warm and repel rain ( buy a nice scarf to go with the hat.) Your shoes should be water-repellant as well as warm. Wet cold feet can chill your day.
You have had lots of advice about money. Getting cash from an ATM operated by a bank is wise but why waste time searching for a particular bank to save a few dollars fee. And don't expect that debit card to be useful for over-the- counter purchases, as you might do back in Canada. Even if it is accepted, your bank back home will charge a foreign-exchange fee. Cash for small purchases, credit card for large.
Actually it is worth investigating multiple currency cash carrying cards. I use Revolut so that I can hold Sterling, pay for stuff in Euros and Swiss Francs. A small amount is required to move sums from one currency to the next and it allows you to pay for AirBnb E100 and ferry crossings E1 on the same system. In my case I link it up to Google cash but I assume Apple has something similar
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Old Sep 29th, 2022, 08:31 AM
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Originally Posted by bilboburgler View Post
Actually it is worth investigating multiple currency cash carrying cards. I use Revolut so that I can hold Sterling, pay for stuff in Euros and Swiss Francs. A small amount is required to move sums from one currency to the next and it allows you to pay for AirBnb E100 and ferry crossings E1 on the same system. In my case I link it up to Google cash but I assume Apple has something similar
I don't understand the difference between that and a normal debit or credit card. I have a US bank account and an Italian account, and the cards from both can be used to buy things in every place I've been. I always choose to pay in the local currency, and let the banks do the conversion.
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