En Suite & B&B

Apr 26th, 2007, 04:06 AM
  #1  
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En Suite & B&B

I am a bit curious, I have been trying to find locations to stay on my trip to Ireland. I searched on Fodor's and my travel book, but I can't seem to understand what en-suite room means in a B&B. (I know I will feel stupid once someone gives me the answer.) Please let me know. I have never stayed at a B&B and I have a feeling I have a wrong impression about them and would love to try a B&B on our Ireland trip.

I apologize in advance for being naive in this subject. Thanks again.
Nuttela is offline  
Apr 26th, 2007, 04:10 AM
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It's one of those funny British / Irish sayings. It means the bathroom / toilet is attached to the room. You don't have to go down the hall and share with others.
beaupeep is offline  
Apr 26th, 2007, 04:12 AM
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Assuming you are both American - what do Americans call this arrangement, out of interest ?
caroline_edinburgh is offline  
Apr 26th, 2007, 04:13 AM
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It means that there is a bathroom attached to your room.

In the past, B & Bs would have shared bathrooms or possibly a private bath down the corridor.
Nowadays many owners have converted their houses to provide en suite. It's what people want and they have moved with the times.
MissPrism is offline  
Apr 26th, 2007, 04:22 AM
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We (Americans) say "attached bath." If it is down the hall, it's "shared bath."

(Funny that I've seen "en suite" mostly in the U.K. and yet it is of course French!)
hausfrau is offline  
Apr 26th, 2007, 04:38 AM
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Or the website will say in a flowery way, "All of our beautifully and tastefully decorated rooms have private bath." Americans are not allowed to use the word toilet whatsoever, except when referring to toilet water aka perfume light!
beaupeep is offline  
Apr 26th, 2007, 05:25 AM
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I'm British and the term "en suite" always irritates me. It always means an en-suite bathroom, generally with a shower and wc. By itself, it is meaningless: it could be an en-suite broom cupboard. Why don't they just say "bathroom", "shower and toilet" or whatever is actually en-suite?
GeoffHamer is offline  
Apr 26th, 2007, 05:35 AM
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In the States it would be called a private bath. That is where a lot of Americans get fouled up booking B&B's in Ireland/GB. Ensuite is just like a US private bath. But in the UK "private bath" means a personal/private bathroom down the hall. It is different than a shared bath and fairly common.

I tell the folks in my travel talks that if they book a "private bath" they should take something they can wear to go down the hall in the middle of the night . . . . . cuz it won't be in the room like back home.
janisj is online now  
Apr 26th, 2007, 06:01 AM
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<(Funny that I've seen "en suite" mostly in the U.K. and yet it is of course French!)>

Brits often it seems use French terms that are not even used in France:

Bureau de Change (France - simply Change)
on trains - Buffet car (France snack bar)
Etc. Weird
PalenQ is offline  
Apr 26th, 2007, 07:10 AM
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They may well have been used there once, crossed the Channel, stayed here but been abandoned there. Just recently I read of an Englishman's account of the Siege of Paris in 1870, which refers to the food shortages having led to the development of something known in French as "la queue" - and he was quite pleased to note that there was no such institution in England.
PatrickLondon is offline  
Apr 27th, 2007, 03:25 AM
  #11  
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I want to thank everyone for answering. It definitly straightened out the en-suite confusion and I also learned a few things too. Thanks again, I appreciate it greatly.

Nuttela is offline  
Apr 27th, 2007, 06:34 AM
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If there is ever a time to try a B&B, the UK is definitely the place. My husband and I ALWAYS stays in B&B's wherever we travel. We would not have it any other way!
travel2live is offline  
Apr 27th, 2007, 09:41 AM
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American are allowed to refer to the "toilet" - but it is a specific object - not a room.

Since the room is used for showering, bathing, washing one's face and hands, drying hair and doing make-up, etc - it is referred to as a "bathroom" not a toilet.

Americans don;t say "en suite" since in the US it is assumed that a hotel or B&B will have a private bath with each room. Very few places (usually small B&Bs or hostels) have shared baths - and those make a point of saying so.
nytraveler is offline  
Apr 27th, 2007, 09:43 AM
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In the US, it isn't really used that often, as almost all hotel rooms do have a bathroom in the room.

It is faux-French, something the British made up. The words are French, but the meaning isn't what those words mean in French and that term isn't used like that in France. The British like to throw around French words because they think it is chic.
Christina is online now  
Apr 27th, 2007, 09:48 AM
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The British like to throw around French words because they think it is chic.

Oh, so it is the British who call the main course an entrée?
Josser is offline  
Apr 27th, 2007, 09:51 AM
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Since the room is used for showering, bathing, washing one's face and hands, drying hair and doing make-up, etc - it is referred to as a "bathroom" not a toilet

Goodness, you do all that in public lavatories and school bogs?
Americans refer to both as bathrooms.
Josser is offline  
Apr 27th, 2007, 09:53 AM
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I had to smile at a John Cleese story.
He said that he was bemused when his former American wife told him that the cat had been to the bathroom on the kitchen floor.
MissPrism is offline  
Apr 27th, 2007, 10:06 AM
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"Assuming you are both American - what do Americans call this arrangement, out of interest"

I'm Canadian & we always call it an ensuite. When building a house it is always referred to as an ensuite. At least in the parts of Canada where I live, which is about as Western Canada as it gets. (very far from french Canada).

I had no idea it was thought of as a "British" saying, although, I'm sure if I had given it much thought I would have figured out it was a french saying.
chopinplayer is offline  
Apr 27th, 2007, 11:38 AM
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I'm American and am the one who said we aren't allowed to say toilet. When you are looking at a house that has a full bathroom that includes a tub, shower, sink and toilet and then there is also an additional room with just a toilet and sink it is called a house with a bath and a half. And there is no bath at all in the 2nd room.

And when Americans are in a public place and need to go to the toilet they NEVER say they are going to the toilet they always say bathroom, or ladies or mens room. But never toilet.
beaupeep is offline  
Apr 27th, 2007, 11:47 AM
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Many US houses even have a separate "toilet room" in their bathrooms. I've never seen that in Europe. What would you call that? En-suite in the en-suite?
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