Edinburgh Lodging Suggestions

Dec 10th, 2008, 07:05 AM
  #21  
 
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turns out there was something divisive about harranging the OP for using the word quaint and that's the blame IMO

Caroline - no but when you post you British and not purposefully use American, right

Thus when an American posts and uses the word quaint we should know what they mean by quaint in the American context and not mistrue it as the British context.

Same with the word Chunnel IMO
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Dec 10th, 2008, 07:07 AM
  #22  
 
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"no but when you post you British and not purposefully use American, right"

umm, Pal? Could you translate that for me, please?
sheila is offline  
Dec 10th, 2008, 07:18 AM
  #23  
 
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Please drop the attitude. Janis simply suggested that the poster "drop the quaint bit from their vocabulary" and then inserted a happy face. There was absolutely nothing divisive about her remark.

Now, I'm finished with justifying janis as her expertise really needs no defense.
historytraveler is online now  
Dec 10th, 2008, 07:19 AM
  #24  
 
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I often use the word quaint w/o ever looking up the meaning, which I have just done. The first definition (Random House) is "having an old-fashioned attractiveness or charm; oddly picturesque." But the synonyms for quaint are very unflattering: funny, odd, bizarre, cranky, erratic, etc.

What word do British folks use in place of quaint? Charming, well-appointed (hear that one in movies)?
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Dec 10th, 2008, 07:28 AM
  #25  
 
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Caroline - my keyboard is slower than my typing today sorry

What i said or meant to say was that when a Briton posts something they do it in British

and on this American dominated forum when Americans post they should also post in their native language with the meanings of words as we know them

and not to try to affect some Britishness, using British terms.

for ex i would not say i want a car with a big boot - i would say i want a car with a big trunk - for me to use boot would be IMO putting on affections - many words like that.

Every American knows what quaint means in American terms - the OP was wanting something as "having an old-fashioned attractiveness or charm; oddly picturesque." (The main definitions pointed out in post above in Random House.)

But Janis chose to diss that for some reason, preferring the British meaning: very unflattering: funny, odd, bizarre, cranky, erratic, etc.

And she did it without explaning why, leaving the OP fummoxed i think - there was no reason to do that IMO in this forum between two Americans.

That said Janisj is a Fodor's treasure and her immense unrivaled knowledge of British things is totally mind-boggling - no Brit even comes close.
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Dec 10th, 2008, 11:40 AM
  #26  
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Oh My! Did I learn something from this posting!! Thanks so much for lodging suggestions and for the clarity on usage of the word quaint! Much appreciated! KOKJO
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Dec 10th, 2008, 11:57 AM
  #27  
 
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Just keep in mind

In Britain,
Quaint
It ain't

and, i'm not on paint
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Dec 10th, 2008, 02:58 PM
  #28  
 
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"and is just offering the benefit of her vast experience and knowledge."
So that means that that one has some right to be abrasive and crass towards others because they have "vast experience and knowledge"? I think not.
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Dec 10th, 2008, 06:32 PM
  #29  
 
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I cringe every time I see the word "quaint" used in questions for info or in trip reports. Likewise, "cute".

I am a New Englander, born and bred, lived here most of my life. I grew up in a small coastal town, where many came to vacation. In those days we were mostly farmers and fishermen. Even those with other jobs supplemented their income with one of these two occupations, or even both. I waitressed summers, and these vacationers seemed to think that windows boarded up and all was deserted after Labor Day. When diners asked me where I went in the winter, and I told them that I stayed right there, the reply was often, "How quaint!" Sometimes that phrase was used to describe something they had seen in their travels that day. I always felt as if it were condescending and patronizing. Just the very tone made me feel as if it were a put down. Of course, now I think it might have been envy that I could live in such a beautiful part of the world all year round.

I no longer live in that small town, but live in one which is heavily visited in summer for our cultural events, in the fall for leaf peeping and in the winter for skiing. I still here that word "quaint" bandied about and cringe.

Sorry for sidetracking the original poster.
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Dec 11th, 2008, 03:28 AM
  #30  
 
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Pal, I take your point that Americans know what each other means by 'quaint'. But since this questions relates to Britain, and thus is likely to get at least some answers from British people, I think it was fair enough for Janis to warn the OP that British people might not like the word applied to where they live - she was trying to be helpful and I don't know why that upsets you so much.

And the dictionary you quote is of course an American dictionary : the Compact OED defines 'quaint' as "attractively unusual or old-fashioned". So was the OP asking for unusual accommodation ?

Some posts here have been abrasive and crass but those words could not be applied to Janis.

Different American/British words can lead to misunderstanding and the wrong advice being offered. For example, here an inn is a pub. I've gathered from Fodor's that Americans (also ?) apply it to a B&B - so in the past, if asked for recommendations of inns (whether quaint or not), I would have suggested only pubs.
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Dec 11th, 2008, 04:30 AM
  #31  
 
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Caroline, my understanding of an inn is a little different from a B&B. I think of an inn as larger, not someone's private home with rooms, more like a small country hotel. The line is a little blurry though.
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Dec 11th, 2008, 08:04 AM
  #32  
 
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Well all and well Caroline

but what word or words should have the OP used in her query:

<Looking for quaint, interesting centrally located lodging.>

now anyone knows that she is looking for an intimate, smallish place and not some Holiday Inn

so quibble with the word quaint what should have the OP said to convey her/his meaning for quaint?

serious question.
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Dec 11th, 2008, 01:16 PM
  #33  
 
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No, Caroline you are wrong. She was not trying to be helpful. If she had she would have initially explained to the OP that "quaint" had a different meaning in the UK. I am sorry but a smiley face doesnt cut it. The tone was condescending which is not unusual from her.
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Dec 11th, 2008, 01:22 PM
  #34  
 
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I think janis was just reacting like she was a Brit - how a Brit would react and meant nothing harmful by it - though it did negate one of the OP's criteria without explanation. Janis is amongst the most helpful posters on Fodor's - time and time again giving really good advice IMO - i actually think she was just trying to be humorous and not realizing how it would be taken.
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Dec 12th, 2008, 12:26 AM
  #35  
 
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Pal, I would say a place with character. Or as you yourself said, an intimate smallish place. Or if she does actually want a B&B, a B&B
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