Cornwall Pasties

Mar 28th, 2005, 05:30 AM
  #1  
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Cornwall Pasties

I was looking at some information for the West Cornwall Pasty Company and another travel site said that pasty does not rhyme with tasty. Now I'm curious about the correct way to say pasty. (They sound delicious, whichever way it's pronounced!)
twina49 is offline  
Mar 28th, 2005, 05:52 AM
  #2  
ira
 
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Hi T,

Pass tee
ira is offline  
Mar 28th, 2005, 06:34 AM
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Correct. It rhymes with "nasty". But they aren't.

Patrick is offline  
Mar 28th, 2005, 08:17 AM
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Hmm - that probably works for American accents, but to avoid any confusion, I'd rhyme it with with lass-tea.
PatrickLondon is offline  
Mar 28th, 2005, 08:26 AM
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There was an episode on Mystery! a few years back that concerned a shopkeeper in Penzance who set up a rival to be accused of a crime he didn't commit.

I wrote to Dame Diana Rigg suggesting they should re-title the piece A Cornish Patsy, but I never heard back.
Robespierre is offline  
Mar 28th, 2005, 08:32 AM
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Yep, rhymes with "nasty" but anyway you say it they still taste delicious!

I got my best friend hooked! He never saw it coming, all wrapped up in that innocent looking pastry dough.

He has a standing order for me to make them once a month. He freezes them and takes them to lunch.
dsm22 is offline  
Mar 28th, 2005, 08:35 AM
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I was born and raised in Iron Mountain, Michigan. The town's first wave of immigrant labor for the mines came from Cornwall which had similar geology with "wet" hard rock mines. In the UP the Welsh were nicknamed "cousin Jacks" because when a job opened at the mine, a miner would ask then to wait a day for my cousin jack to arrive.
Pasties were a dough crust (lard-based in the French style} around a filling of potatoes, onions and whatever meat scraps the wife had. The miners could heat them up on the boiler fire for the steam pump which kept the water level low in the diggings.
Pasties (rhymes with nasty in the UP} were mainly available at ski jumping meets and other events when the baker in Iron Mountain bought his pasty wagon. You wrapped them in wax paper, bit open the end, poured in catsup and warmed your stomach.
payant is offline  
Mar 28th, 2005, 09:21 AM
  #8  
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Thanks for the assistance on how to pronounce "pasty." I'll be sure to try some when I'm in the U.K. Other than West Cornwall Pasty Company, any other suggestions for where to buy particularly good pasties?
twina49 is offline  
Mar 28th, 2005, 10:19 AM
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I asked the same question last spring:

http://www.fodors.com/forums/threads...2&tid=34505708
Robespierre is offline  
Feb 27th, 2010, 06:25 PM
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The westcountry past company makes amazing pasties and you should try them here is the link to their website http://www.westcountry-pasty-company.co.uk
http://www.wholesale-pasties.com
http://www.wholesale-pasties.co.uk
flawley is offline  
Feb 27th, 2010, 07:15 PM
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My mother's mother was a coal miner's daughter from Merthr Tydfil, Wales. She made pasties once a week, usually on Friday night and we would have them with takeout pizza.

I haven't had a pasty since she died in 2004. I really miss her and those pasties.

Thin
ThinGorjus is offline  
Feb 27th, 2010, 07:38 PM
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Too much dough. I'll take a stromboli or calzone any day over a pasty.
Otzi is offline  
Feb 28th, 2010, 12:04 AM
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"Too much dough. I'll take a stromboli or calzone any day over a pasty."

You don't have to eat the thick crust on the edge of the pasty, the crust was so you could eat the pasty with dirty hands (no place to wash them down the mines).

Regards.
Hooameye is offline  
Feb 28th, 2010, 12:25 AM
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>>My mother's mother was a coal miner's daughter from Merthr Tydfil, Wales. She made pasties once a week, usually on Friday night and we would have them with takeout pizza.<<

And you're thin?
PatrickLondon is offline  

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