Carrying a Bottle of Water

Old Sep 4th, 2013, 03:39 AM
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<i>How can the HONEST answer be THEY PROBABLY DON'T? When you say honest answer, shouldn't there be an answer?</i>

There was an answer.


So, I just now went around and asked seven female colleagues that I would consider "locals" (live and work in the area and are reasonably fluent in the language) about their water carrying practices. All asked said that they normally don't carry water with them when are doing their normal day-to-day activities. One did say she carries a water bottle but it goes on her bike so I'm not sure how to catalog that data point since she's not walking.

To make sure I am not working in an area that could be considered a statistical anomaly, I'll ask around outside the office.
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Old Sep 4th, 2013, 05:07 AM
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I do not carry water with me when I am at home. I do when I'm traveling. Just as I don't wear a money belt at home, but I do when traveling. Different circumstances, different needs. But then, my appearance is a matter of considerable indifference to me, since I'm old enough to wear purple.
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Old Sep 4th, 2013, 05:09 AM
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Purple has an age restriction???!!!
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Old Sep 4th, 2013, 05:11 AM
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Please Thursdaysd. You were my hero.
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Old Sep 4th, 2013, 05:20 AM
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colduphere - I didn't say I wore it, just that I was old enough, lol. (Hate pink and purple.)

jamikens - see book by Sandra Martz, "When I am an old woman I shall wear purple", very popular for a while.
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Old Sep 4th, 2013, 05:29 AM
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"I didn't say I wore it just that I was old enough"

Than God! Thought you might be a red hatter.l
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Old Sep 4th, 2013, 05:31 AM
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I also carry a bottle of water when visiting warm areas in the US. The office where I work has a water cooler for guests and employees and it is well used.
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Old Sep 4th, 2013, 05:42 AM
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At home I don't have water with me.
If we go out for a day I quite often take my water bottle, just in case.
When we were in Limburg recently I forgot to take my bottle, and yes I was thirsty, and no we didn't keep stopping to buy something to drink. I didn't buy a bottle of water either. If we had been away more than 2 nights I would have done.
My tiny cross body bag isn't big enough to hold a bottle. It only holds phone, glasses, passes and a small amount of cash.
I clip my refillable bottle to the strap normally.
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Old Sep 4th, 2013, 06:10 AM
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The locals around here are as water-obsessed as tourists, it's just not as obvious. New employees at the company where I work get a liter bottle with their other office supplies. Many fill it up with water when they get into work each morning. All around the workplace, there are water dispenses offering bottled water at room temperature, cold water, and sparkling water.

There are flowing water fountains all over the city and in most small towns. All offer excellent quality drinking water except for those specifically labeled as having water that's not intended for drinking.

Grocery stores sell bottled water at reasonable prices (under 1 franc for a bottle). But convenience and other stores often charge ridiculous prices ($4 for a small bottle of water).

We carry a bottle of water around but it's usually for our dog -- she's 14 and a half and can dehydrated easily, esp in the summer.
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Old Sep 4th, 2013, 06:41 AM
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All this talk of water is making me thirsty...
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Old Sep 4th, 2013, 06:55 AM
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This has to be one of the silliest threads ever.
If you need to carry around a 500 ml bottle of water, get a bag that's big enough.

You are flying to Europe, staying in hotels, visiting museums and restaurants - but have no budget to buy some water from a local shop during your stay? Fine, just carry the bottle and refill it. Why would you need advice from a forum on this?
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Old Sep 4th, 2013, 06:57 AM
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<i>This has to be one of the silliest threads ever.
If you need to carry around a 500 ml bottle of water, get a bag that's big enough.

You are flying to Europe, staying in hotels, visiting museums and restaurants - but have no budget to buy some water from a local shop during your stay? Fine, just carry the bottle and refill it. Why would you need advice from a forum on this?</i>

I demand an internet high-five.
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Old Sep 4th, 2013, 07:13 AM
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I'm curious, where exactly did the OP say they had no budget for buying water? They asked about carrying it, not buying it. Other posters brought up the cost issue, including some of us who were giving a local, not tourist, perspective.
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Old Sep 4th, 2013, 07:23 AM
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How many Northern European locals responded to this thread?

I still don't understand the purpose of the neck pouch plus carrying a shopping bag for the water bottle. It's easier to keep track of 1 thing to carry rather than 2 things plus shopping bags are annoying to carry all day.

Perhaps the OP should ask her friends, who recommended the neck pouch, how they carry their water bottles.

I think this was an amusing thread and certainly not sillier than those from people who can't dress themselves.
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Old Sep 4th, 2013, 07:23 AM
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I suggested sticking it in a bag.
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Old Sep 4th, 2013, 07:50 AM
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I don't carry water as a rule. However, I might on the tube in the summer as it can be stifling, and in warmer climes I think it's essential to avoid dehydration, headaches etc. You can buy a smaller bottle that fits easily into a bag and refill at water fountains. If I was in a restaurant that had tap water on the table or bottled mineral water, I'd have no qualms about taking or decanting that when I left.

Btw I tend to find men are ideal for carrying the big 2 litre bottles (in addition to the earlier threads where we extolled their virtues as recepticles for mobile phones, keys, tampons etc). I think you can find them in the travel accessories in Boots, between adaptors and insect repellent.
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Old Sep 4th, 2013, 08:02 AM
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I'm a northern European.
And I say buy water from a local shop, or go to a cafe. You'll need the loo anyway, so might as well get your water from a cafe.
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Old Sep 4th, 2013, 09:08 AM
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"Btw I tend to find men are ideal for carrying the big 2 litre bottles (in addition to the earlier threads where we extolled their virtues as recepticles for mobile phones, keys, tampons etc). I think you can find them in the travel accessories in Boots, between adaptors and insect repellent."

I've never looked for men in the travel accessories of Boots, but each to their own.
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Old Sep 4th, 2013, 09:16 AM
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Try the bargain bins too, if you don't mind slightly used/damaged ones.
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Old Sep 4th, 2013, 10:48 AM
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"And I say buy water from a local shop"

Why should I pay for water when the tap water is drinkable? I do it in Asia, but see no reason to in Europe. Plus, even if you buy big bottles and decant into smaller (which you're not going to do while you're out and about) you're adding to the disastrous plastic pollution.

(Not sure what being a northern European has to do with it - I grew up in England, although I currently live in the US.)
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