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Bringing fruits, vegetables, cooked eggs, tuna cans, shelf stable meals

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Apr 29th, 2014, 03:52 PM
  #1
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Bringing fruits, vegetables, cooked eggs, tuna cans, shelf stable meals

I tried looking online, but there is not clear website to check.
Are we allowed to bring fresh fruits, vegetables, cooked eggs, tuna cans, and shelf stable meals into croatia, slovenia, italy, switzerland, germany, from the united states?
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Apr 29th, 2014, 03:54 PM
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from where?
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Apr 29th, 2014, 03:55 PM
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ekc
 
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Why would you want to? Why not just shop the fabulous produce, etc. in the country?
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Apr 29th, 2014, 03:58 PM
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Why carry all this stuff? Can't figure out a real reason. Maybe a tiny something for the flight but this long list makes no sense. All this stuff which will be better quality is available throughout the world. Why carry more weight and answer TSA questions.
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Apr 29th, 2014, 04:19 PM
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Fresh fruits and vegetables, generally not.
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Apr 29th, 2014, 04:26 PM
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Even if you could take it, how would you carry it all and how would you keep fruits, vegetables and cooked eggs fresh?
Perhaps you have been misled about what is available. You can find canned tuna everywhere, but local food in every country you mentioned is fresh and better than just about anything you could take with you: cheese and breads in Switzerland you will want to bring home with you, wursts in Germany, prosciutto in Italy, lemons and limes, apples that are tree ripened, not picked green and shipped. You get the idea.
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Apr 29th, 2014, 04:40 PM
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TTT just to see why.
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Apr 29th, 2014, 05:20 PM
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We usually take a box of crackers or mac & cheese with us but fresh fruits and veggies? They are usually cheaper and fresher in Europe.
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Apr 29th, 2014, 05:50 PM
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I remember when (in the last ice age) we were advised to take cans of tuna, peanut butter and crackers to Russia - so you had something to eat when you couldn't stand any more mystery meat, canned peas and plum juice. But that was a VERY long time ago.

Fruits and veggies in the street markets in europe will be both fresh and in season - and better than you can get in the average supermarket in the US. (I HATE the gigantic mutant strawberries here - huge, bright red and no taste at all - versus the tiny, fresh incredibly delicious ones you get in Italy etc in season.)

And if you must have packaged meals for some reason you can get those on the spot as well.

With no questions about why you are hauling half a grocery with you.
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Apr 29th, 2014, 06:00 PM
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Are you planning on putting it in your carryon or checking it? You probably could take them either way. Going to Switzerland, I have checked Heluva Good dip and Nando's sauce for my friend living there. It was checked by TSA which was really funny as they wrapped it up in TSA tape. I also took soup, cans of tuna fish, mayo, kraft mac & cheese, cans of chef boyardee and cans of cat food all in my checked luggage and I wasn't stopped by anyone. My friend is always taking food back to Europe. According to her, she was even taking bacon and other meats and was never stopped. Not sure if she still does but she also has no fear due to what she does for a living. I don't think I would try the meats.

Is there a reason why you want take the fruit, vegetables and eggs? Those you can buy in all the countries you plan on going so I wouldn't take them. The other stuff you might not but I even saw Philly cream cheese in Switzerland.
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Apr 29th, 2014, 06:18 PM
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Why the he** would you want to? It's not as though they don't have food in Europe. But to answer your question, most of the things you mention, like fresh fruits and veggies and meats, would not be allowed into Europe, and the Ag folks at Immigration would have a good guffaw on your behalf.
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Apr 29th, 2014, 07:25 PM
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Huh? Some sort of trick question, or special diet requirements? European fruits, veggies, meats are one of the best reasons to travel there.
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Apr 29th, 2014, 07:43 PM
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There is no one website that can answer your question. You have to start from http://travel.state.gov/content/pass...h/country.html and dig further down the links which get you to each individual consulate, then to their own customs pages.
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Apr 29th, 2014, 07:57 PM
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Of the countries listed, I have only flown to Italy. However it is my experience that I have only been asked whether I am bringing fresh food when I have flown to the US, not when I have flown from the US to Europe. When you fly to the US, you have to fill out a customs form that asks you about those items, but in European airports that I have seen there is usually a door for customs saying "nothing to declare" and you just walk through it.

And I have several times had fresh fruit or vegetables that I carried with me on the plane for snacks that I had not finished and brought with me into various European countries with no problem. The only place I have seen the little sniffer dogs looking for things like that in people's luggage was in Boston.
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Apr 29th, 2014, 10:38 PM
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According to German Customs:

When meat or milk, or meat or dairy products such as sausage or cheese are imported for personal consumption they must meet the same veterinary requirements as those applying to commercial imports.

This means that travellers who are carrying such products may only enter the European Union through those points of entry where a veterinarian is on duty. The necessary health certificates and a validated Common Veterinary Entry Document - CVED (Gemeinsames Veterinärdokument für die Einfuhr - GVDE) must also accompany the products.


and

In addition to the import of poultry meat and products made therefrom, the import of poultry products such as eggs, of uncooked pet foods, or of untreated hunting trophies is also expressly banned. This ban applies not only to commercial imports, but also to imports made in the course of private travel and to such products being transported when moving house

As far as vegetables go, it's unclear but potatoes are strictly prohibited:

There is a general prohibition of the import of even small quantities of potatoes by travellers because of the danger of spreading potato ring rot.




If you're bringing the food to eat on your flight and it will all be consumed before you land, I don't see an issue. If you plan to land with it and actually bring it into the country, I have to ask why as the food quality in Europe will overall be better than in the U.S.
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Apr 29th, 2014, 11:48 PM
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Germany has an exception as foolllows:

Exemptions to these regulations apply to the following goods, among others:

* baby food and special foods required for medicinal purposes and transported in unopened retail packages of 2 kg or less,
* foods containing small quantities of milk or cream such as cream sweets, chocolate or biscuits,
* up to 2 kg of other animal-based products containing meat or milk or goods produced with animal-based products (e.g. honey) and up to 20 kg of fishery products (e.g. fresh, cooked or smoked fish as well as certain shellfish such as shrimp and lobsters) or the weight of an individual fish if this is higher
* Travellers can therefore carry these products in the indicated quantities with no difficulty.

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Apr 30th, 2014, 12:32 AM
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Detailed rules are pretty much the same for all the countries the poster mentions, except Switzerland. In English, they're at https://www.gov.uk/personal-food-pla...f-restrictions

Note that the rules for food entirely of vegetable origin are in a link at the bottom of the page. For passengers arriving from outside Europe or the Mediterranean, they limit fruit and veg imports to a total of 2 kg, and ban raw potatoes altogether

Switzerland has quite separate rules, which may in some cases be more restrictive.

However, we have better things to do with our money than waste it on silly little dogs sniffing us in case we're carrying an orange, or pay armed police to interrogate us about whether chocolates contain milk powder. We leave that kind of Government bullying to "freedom loving" Americans.

The chances are that, if you really want to import inedible food, no-one's going to stop you.
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Apr 30th, 2014, 12:38 AM
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I hate going back to the U.S. and eating the eggs there.
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Apr 30th, 2014, 05:34 AM
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Omelets always taste better in France! The best eggs I've ever had were in Poland (Wroclaw).
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Apr 30th, 2014, 05:39 AM
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Bringing fruits, vegetables, cooked eggs, tuna cans, shelf stable meals
Posted by: zxcvbnm on Apr 29, 14 at 6:52pm
I tried looking online, but there is not clear website to check.
Are we allowed to bring fresh fruits, vegetables, cooked eggs, tuna cans, and shelf stable meals into croatia, slovenia, italy, switzerland, germany, from the united states?


You can bring coals to Newcastle.
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