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Austrian Cuisine in Vienna-What and Where

Austrian Cuisine in Vienna-What and Where

Old Sep 20th, 2013, 06:54 AM
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Austrian Cuisine in Vienna-What and Where

I assume, perhaps incorrectly, there is something one would describe as Austrian cuisine and perhaps even Viennese or something unique for/peculiar to Vienna.

And why is it I think it would involve more than "schnitzel?" And what, if anything, would make something "authentic?"

Bottom line: looking for possible places to eat, both lunch and dinner. Staying at the Kempinski but willing to travel a bit within the city.

And I want more than some strange looking "sauce" smeared on the plate like finger painting and enough food on the plate that doesn't require a microscope to see. i already KNOW how rich I am so I don't need to eat in some particular venue to validate my self-worth.

Thanks.
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Old Sep 20th, 2013, 07:08 AM
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My wife and I ate at Gasthaus Poschl and thought it was excellent. the Wiener schnitzel is definitely top notch. I think we ate there for lunch but can't recall.

here's the link on trip advisor - http://www.tripadvisor.com/Restauran...hl-Vienna.html

We also liked Die Halle Cafe Restaurant der Kunsthalle Wien. It was also very good. We ate here for dinner.

Here's its link on Trip Advisor - http://www.tripadvisor.com/Restauran...en-Vienna.html
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Old Sep 20th, 2013, 07:53 AM
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sachertorte

A legendary Vienna cake

Also croissants were born here and still are a treat.
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Old Sep 20th, 2013, 08:08 AM
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Pal: I have to disagree about the sachertorte. I thought it was good, but the sachertorte I buy at my neighborhood Safeway was just as good. The coffee at the Hotel Sacher, however, was wonderful!
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Old Sep 20th, 2013, 08:14 AM
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Peg - I never said anything about how they taste - just that they were a legendary part of Viennese cuisine.
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Old Sep 20th, 2013, 08:46 AM
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IMHO the Sachertort at the hotel is dry as dust and has minimal flavor. Any neighborhood bakery were I live has better chioces. (There are numerous places to get wonderful pastes in Vienna - this just isn;t one of them. And remember the key words are "mit schlag".

As for typical viennese cuisine - yes there is a lot more than schnitzel - wonderful dumplings, lots of red cabbage, local versions of pot roast (sauerbraten) and stewed chicken - and of course all sorts of game (venison, boar etc) at the right time of year. Good but very hearty and stuffed with calories.

Just look at the menus of a bunch of larger restaurants.
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Old Sep 20th, 2013, 09:30 AM
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Thank you for these suggestions; they are exactly what I was hoping to find.
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Old Sep 20th, 2013, 10:25 AM
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Dukey,

as you say that you are willing to go further afield, can i suggest that you go out to Heiligenstadt and/or Grinzing and go to a Heurige? the best serve their own wine [you look for the huge branch of fir tree sticking out over the door] and lovely local food, often a buffet, which we found to be very reasonable.

We started off at the Beethoven Wohnung [the house he used to live in in the summer] to get a bit of culture, and then moved only the nearby Heurige, moving on from there.

the only problem is limiting how much you drink!
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Old Sep 20th, 2013, 10:35 AM
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I thought the real Sachertort was an abomination. But I pretty much thought that about most everything we ate in Vienna. Exceptions were when we got out into the countryside and had delicious wild boar with cherry sauce, venison, pheasant, and other game dishes. Best bet is to go on a beer diet.
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Old Sep 20th, 2013, 12:13 PM
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How about some modern Austrian cuisine? I've eaten well here, and at least the building is old:

http://www.palmenhaus.at/content/
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Old Sep 20th, 2013, 01:43 PM
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No Tafelspitz?

A Sachertorte would taste decidedly better dipped in the broth of a Tafelspitz.
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Old Sep 20th, 2013, 03:45 PM
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Tafelspitz, various dumplings, soups are often really good, mostly tasty clear broth with various additions, and pumpkin seed oil on salads.

~Liz
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Old Sep 20th, 2013, 05:14 PM
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If you like crispy pork knuckles, then you'll need to have a Schweinstelze. My husband loves them and he had a really good one at the Prater at this restaurant. They have a nice outdoor eating area.

http://www.schweizerhaus.at/#!/page_home
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Old Sep 20th, 2013, 09:39 PM
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Chiming in as a food lover living in Vienna, I hope I can add to the discussion.

Austrian cuisine is not unlike American cuisine; both reflect their historical influences, and food origin controversies abound on both sides of the pond! I wouldn't call Austrian cuisine an abomination, though.

Apfelstrudel? The mention of the savory, flaky pastry conjures up images of a long afternoon in a Viennese cafe, with a classic melange and the strudel holding court on your table. Yet at the turn of the 20th century in Austria, the Hapsburg Empire counted at least 10 ethnic groups in their fold, among them the Hungarians, whose Almasretes was like the friendly frontier line between the Hapsburgs sweets and the Ottoman Empire's Baklava. The pastry abounds here, and sometimes there are raisins inside, so beware!

Wiener Schnitzel may be associated with Vienna, but it is an adaptation of the Milanese Coteletta, described in a letter to Kaiser Franz Josef I from an assistant, and co-opted by the empire. A well-prepared schnitzel is quite good and won't leave you feeling like you've just spent €20 on a flat chicken nugget.

Sachertorte is dry and tasteless. Overcook your pan of brownies and you'll have the same experience. There are so many other delicious tortes and sweets that you'll remember fondly here.

Tafelspitz is a boiled beef dish. For one of the best experiences, enjoy it at Plachutta. (And watch the Euros fly out of your pocketbook while doing so.) Sauerbraten is a German dish; the Austrian equivalent (of sorts) is Zweiblrostbraten (roast beef with crispy onions and potatoes)

Backhendl is a 19th century delicacy and "culinary symbol of the wealth of the aristocracy and bourgeoisie," although it never officially made its way to the Imperial Court. In America we call it fried chicken, the origins of which are Scottish. I have savored no fewer than a half-dozen or so variations in the last year here, only one of which was akin to what a McBackhendl might taste like should the dish ever be co-opted by the Golden Arches.

bettyk, you are right on the mark for the roast pork knee. Schweizerhaus is top-rate.

The heuriger are delightful. Mayer am Pfarrplatz is well-known and you'll have a pleasant experience, but for something more local in flavor, head away from Grinzing and its tour buses to Nußdorf. Schubel Auer is good, for now. They're recently landed in Rick Steve's book, so the tourists will start flocking. Next door is Kierlinger, slightly shabby in comparison but with a prettier garden and very good fare. Or head higher up into the vineyards (after 16:00; most of the smaller places don't open until then).

The roast game is becoming more and more present on restaurant menus, even in the short while we've lived here. Wild boar gulasch is very good.

Seasonal eating means you're eating Austrian cuisine, too! Right now it's eierschwammerl time (field mushrooms!), and I'm hard pressed not to enjoy eierschwammerl with noodles when we go out, because I know I'll have to wait a while to enjoy it again. Next up will be the steinpilz, then the goose, Christmas markets and glühwein, and so on...

Guten Apetit with whatever Austrian cuisine you choose!
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Old Sep 29th, 2013, 06:03 AM
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Heurigen

Mayer am Pfarrplatz (as mentioned by fourfortravel)
Schreiber-Haus, in Neustift am Walde
If Grinzing is a must, go a bit uphill from the huge touristy Heurigen until you find Brandl's small & cosy heurigen/beer garten near Peter-Alexander-Platz. No tourist buses up here.

Sweet tooth

Any Aida chain Konditorei will give you a wide choice of creamy pastries and Torten at half the price as the Konditoreien in the 1st district.
Caveat: Saying that Sachertorte is dry is like saying that Long Island Ice Tea gives you a headache. Both are meant to be that way. These types of dryer cakes are very common in Central/Eastern Europe and way up to Scandinavia and into Russia. Just like Guglhupf, Marble Cake, Nut Cake and so on. The preference that any sweet treat has to be soaking wet from fat or cream is not commonly shared across the globe.

Tichy ice cream parlor, Reumannplatz. You will gain 10 pounds just from reading the menu.
Cobenzl - not only a cafe, but a great view over Vienna and the Grinzing/Döbling vineyards. Bus 39A towards Kahlenberg stops there.

Restaurants
Zum Schwarzen Kameel (expensive, refined traditional Austrian cuisine, 1st district)
Fischer Bräu (inexpensive micro brew /beer garden, good food, nice crowd, many students, 19th district)

Keep in mind that also many/most Cafe (but not Cafe-Konditorei!) will have a full menu - as large as a fully-fledged restaurant. And many stay open till very late at night. Cafe Drechsler on Naschmarkt is a nice one, for example..
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Old Sep 29th, 2013, 06:15 AM
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on the radio this morning i heard someone of note recommending the landmarken cafe or something like that..sorry dont know the spelling..its famous cafe where freud hung out...also the sacher...famous for the torte...ive had it and loved it

personally i found the hundertwassen (sp) area good..near the whacky toilets ( the multicoloured wayout building that every guide book features...theres a cafe right upstairs in this tiny mall...great veal..fantastic fried sourkraut and soups with bread..sorry i dont have my diary with me at the moment
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Old Sep 29th, 2013, 06:53 AM
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Try http://www.stomach.at/en/ for Styrian cuisine. It also serves a wine from the wild grape of the region that is unlike any other wine I've had and liked.
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Old Sep 29th, 2013, 07:31 AM
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Cowboy, shhh. Restaurant Brandl is too good to share with "visitors." But I beg to differ on dry Central/Eastern European cakes being a matter of fact. My Polish grandmother and mother never let a dry cake reach the table. I've heard, and read, that the cake was made to be dry in order to travel well. Perhaps not enough apricot jam, and definitely not enough chocolate?

lanejohann, that would be Cafe Landtman in the Inner Stadt. I've not been there, but every time I walked past the outdoor tables this summer they were all busy. And, they have a beautiful Christmas tree display.

Michael, thank you for sharing the link, although their website seems to be under development. DH and I are always in search of interesting Austrian cuisine.
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Old Sep 29th, 2013, 07:32 AM
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lanejohann.. you probably mean the Cafe Landtmann
http://www.landtmann.at/
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Old Sep 29th, 2013, 07:53 AM
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IMHO the Sachertort at the hotel is dry as dust and has minimal flavor.

The Sachertorte never tempted me because even before Air Express deliveries it was advertised something that could be shipped around the world. It might work with a nut based Linzertorte but not with a flour/chocolate combination.
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