Anzio & Nettuno

Oct 25th, 2007, 06:22 AM
  #1  
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Anzio & Nettuno

Been watching PBS' The War documentary of The Big One, WWII

and they had a lot of Anzio and Nettuno, Italy not far southwest of Rome on the coast. Called Operation Shingle the battle lasted four months, ending June 5th, 1944, a day before D-Day

It seems Operation Shingle may have been perhaps not as important as D-day or as bloody but still important

It seems these towns get a paucity of tourist interest as compared to D-Day

I have not been there and seek to know both about the towns themselve, how far the cemeteries are from train stations and whether the experience of the place is on the same poignant scale as D-Day beaches.
Though there is a lot of info on web, such as below i appreciate FodorFriends experiences more.

Anyone been there and tell me more about your experiences?

I'll be going this winter i hope

I Found this part of the Wikipedia entry very interesting, especially about Pink Floyd

:Main article: Operation Shingle
Anzio and Nettuno are also notable as sites of an Allied forces landing (Operation Shingle) and ensuing four-month battle during World War II. The Commonwealth Anzio War Cemetery and Beach Head War Cemetery are located here. The battle of Anzio is depicted in the film of Pink Floyd's The Wall and the newly-remastered version of The Final Cut, in the song "When the Tigers Broke Free"; the father of Pink Floyd front man Roger Waters died there in the battle. See also 7 Steps Down, a novel of World War II Anzio, published in 2007. American forces (5th Army) were surrounded by Germans in the caves of Pozzoli in February 1944. They were surrounded for a week and then suffered heavy casualties.

Main sights
In Anzio can be found the Anzio Beachhead British Military Cemetery and a Beachhead Museum. The American Military Cemetery is in Nettuno. About 8 km north of the town there is a WWF park with sulfur springs and a medieval tower, Tor Caldara. All along the coast a large number of beaches and sea resorts can be found, including hotels and the famous fish restaurants of the port of Anzio. The city once hosted a Casino that is no longer active and now hosts cultural events. In the southern part of the town, close to the border with Nettuno, are many Italian art nouveau style houses.

American Battle Monuments CommissionSicily-Rome American Cemetery lies at the north edge of the town of Nettuno, Italy, which is immediately east of Anzio, 38 miles south of Rome.

Anzio - Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaAnzio is a city and resort on the coast of the Lazio region of Italy, about 33 miles south of Rome. Well known for its seaside harbor setting, ...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anzio

World War II
Main article: Operation Shingle
Anzio and Nettuno are also notable as sites of an Allied forces landing (Operation Shingle) and ensuing four-month battle during World War II. The Commonwealth Anzio War Cemetery and Beach Head War Cemetery are located here. The battle of Anzio is depicted in the film of Pink Floyd's The Wall and the newly-remastered version of The Final Cut, in the song "When the Tigers Broke Free"; the father of Pink Floyd front man Roger Waters died there in the battle. See also 7 Steps Down, a novel of World War II Anzio, published in 2007. American forces (5th Army) were surrounded by Germans in the caves of Pozzoli in February 1944. They were surrounded for a week and then suffered heavy casualties.


World War II
Main article: Operation Shingle
Anzio and Nettuno are also notable as sites of an Allied forces landing (Operation Shingle) and ensuing four-month battle during World War II. The Commonwealth Anzio War Cemetery and Beach Head War Cemetery are located here. The battle of Anzio is depicted in the film of Pink Floyd's The Wall and the newly-remastered version of The Final Cut, in the song "When the Tigers Broke Free"; the father of Pink Floyd front man Roger Waters died there in the battle. See also 7 Steps Down, a novel of World War II Anzio, published in 2007. American forces (5th Army) were surrounded by Germans in the caves of Pozzoli in February 1944. They were surrounded for a week and then suffered heavy casualties.


[edit] Main sights
In Anzio can be found the Anzio Beachhead British Military Cemetery and a Beachhead Museum. The American Military Cemetery is in Nettuno. About 8 km north of the town there is a WWF park with sulfur springs and a medieval tower, Tor Caldara. All along the coast a large number of beaches and sea resorts can be found, including hotels and the famous fish restaurants of the port of Anzio. The city once hosted a Casino that is no longer active and now hosts cultural events. In the southern part of the town, close to the border with Nettuno, are many Italian art nouveau style houses.



PalenQ is offline  
Oct 25th, 2007, 06:59 AM
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I visited Nettuno on a day trip from Rome a few years ago. The train ride from Termini takes about an hour or so. The historic district on the sea is lovely and there is a fantstic seafood restaurant, Da Rodo, in the newer part of town. Lunch here was a primary impetus for making the trip. Da Rodo closes Wednesdays, takes no credit cards, and does not have a prominent sign in front. Decor is no frills; seafood is speakling fresh. I learned about the restaurant from Fred Plotkin, who has an evocative chaper on Nettuno in his classic guide to Italy. After lunch we walked, about 30 minutes or so, to the cemetery and small museum. HIghly recommended and extremely moving.
ekscrunchy is offline  
Oct 25th, 2007, 07:02 AM
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Hi Pal - An excellent book on the Anzio landings is this new one by British military historian Lloyd Clark.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Anzio-Fricti.../dp/0755314204

Recommended reading if you plan to visit ...

Steve

Steve_James is offline  
Oct 25th, 2007, 08:20 AM
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ekscrunchy and steve - thanks a lot - sounds like it's worth the day trip from Rome

i will read the book before going as then it will be all the more interesting.

thanks again
PalenQ is offline  
Oct 25th, 2007, 08:41 AM
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I was there in April its amazing. Go its a short trip from Rome and then do a picnic at the beach thats what we did. There is also a open style market just outside the walls of the memorial. Do go to the office and sign in and watch the video they have.
If your of a age as I am it will tug your heartstrings.
JoanneH is offline  
Oct 25th, 2007, 09:29 AM
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PalenQ;

By all means, go south of Rome. The American Military Cemetery just a bit out of central Nettuno,is far more tranquil than those in France and Luxemburg. Again, we were the only visitors on a day in Early Spring. As suggested, see the film and the memorial noted by Joanne H above.
Yes,Joanne, I too am "of an age" maybe older than yours, and I was easily moved to my usual "choke up" demeanor, as was my wife. The sheer beauty and layout of the grounds make for a decidedly paradoxical effect when you consider the toll the battles took over 60 years ago.
Stu T.

tower is offline  
Oct 25th, 2007, 10:16 AM
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DRJ
 
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ekscrunchy: I did the exact trip as you several years ago. I was taken with Plotkin's description of the restaurant. (I thought it was just ok.) The cemetery was sobering, to say the least.
DRJ is offline  
Oct 25th, 2007, 11:00 AM
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DRJ: From our discussion with the restaurant staff, it would appear that Fred's description of the Nettuno excursion has prompted quite a few people to discover the town. They still seemed very excited, and even a bit perplexed, to receive foreign visitors. His page or two on Nettuno forms one of the loveliest passages in his book and I rrecommend reading it for that alone, not to mention all the other great (not always out of date) information. "Sobering" is an excellent descriptor for the cemetery visit.

Waht was it that disapppointed you about Da Rodo? I was thinking of going back next time in Rome but wonder if things have changed since we visited about 5 years ago...
ekscrunchy is offline  

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