A drive in Europe

Mar 11th, 2014, 11:45 AM
  #21  
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
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Oh, I am aware of substituting Barcelona for Munich. I think the kids would enjoy Barcelona just as much.
My idea is just one of many options.
Sassafrass is offline  
Mar 11th, 2014, 10:19 PM
  #22  
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Thank you everyone for you input. I think I agree with many in that I'm sure we are all going to be ready to head inland once we get off the ship. I do look forward to the medieval old city sites which would then give the kids a taste of both worlds, the beach tropics and the European Old World.

I am really starting to think about eliminating Italy and/or Germany all together and spending more quality time in a few choice cities rather than rushing all around. Just thinking about all that time driving trying to get to too many places is kind of a bummer.

We live in California which is so big, someone once told me that European cities are so close together that driving in Europe from one Country to another is shorter than driving from Sacramento to Los Angeles.

I will keep checking back for more ideas as the after cruise itinerary probably won't be carved in stone for at least another couple of days.
2ladies is offline  
Mar 11th, 2014, 10:26 PM
  #23  
 
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>>driving in Europe from one Country to another is shorter than driving from Sacramento to Los Angeles. <<

Ah - yes, but there is no I-5 connecting them (and even the autobahns/motorways that do link Major Europeans cities . . . a lot like I-5 -- no scenery to speak of (but thankfully no Harris Ranch either )

And once you get to those European cities -- they were built 1,000 years ago - not 100 years ago, and have VERY narrow streets, no parking, and vast areas where cars are not allowed at all.

PLUS - trains actually go places you want to visit . . . Not Bakersfield, Emeryville, Fresno, and downtown LA.
janisj is online now  
Mar 11th, 2014, 10:58 PM
  #24  
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Thank you everyone for you input. I think I agree with many in that I'm sure we are all going to be ready to head inland once we get off the ship. I do look forward to the medieval old city sites which would then give the kids a taste of both worlds, the beach tropics and the European Old World.

I am really starting to think about eliminating Italy and/or Germany all together and spending more quality time in a few choice cities rather than rushing all around. Just thinking about all that time driving trying to get to too many places is kind of a bummer.

We live in California which is so big, someone once told me that European cities are so close together that driving in Europe from one Country to another is shorter than driving from Sacramento to Los Angeles.

I will keep checking back for more ideas as the after cruise itinerary probably won't be carved in stone for at least another couple of days.
2ladies is offline  
Mar 11th, 2014, 11:00 PM
  #25  
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Opps, sorry, I accidentally posted twice!!
2ladies is offline  
Mar 11th, 2014, 11:04 PM
  #26  
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I hear you janisj! I am thinking we would like to take a high speed train to at least one of the destinations so we can at least say we rode one!
2ladies is offline  
Mar 12th, 2014, 12:25 AM
  #27  
 
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Americans for some reason seem to believe Europe is 'tiny' - but actually France is about the size of Texas, and has a population of 65 million people, much bigger than that of California at 38 million.
mjdh1957 is offline  
Mar 12th, 2014, 09:24 AM
  #28  
 
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Spain is large also, and Italy, though narrow, is so long, it takes more travel time than people expect. Germany is long. Countries may be close. Hey, they touch each other, but cities are not next door to one another. It is like saying you can drive from Illinois to Missouri just by crossing a bridge. Sure you can, but it takes a lot longer to drive from Chicago to St Louis. You can cross a bridge from Missouri to Kentucky in half an hour, but you can't quickly go from St Louis to Paducah or Louisville. Same is true for European countries. Fortunately, Europe has excellent train service, but even with fast trains, it is not instant. People need to look at maps and read the scale.
Sassafrass is offline  
Mar 12th, 2014, 12:44 PM
  #29  
 
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<>

Amen to that! Does anyone know how to do that anymore, though?
StCirq is offline  
Mar 13th, 2014, 04:37 AM
  #30  
 
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I think you are operating on very mistaken impressions of how long it will take to get form one place to another. European countries are (mostly) not tiny - and it can easily take a full day to cross most of them - byt train or car.

We have done many road trips in europe - and they are great for seeing countryside and small villages but awful for seeing major cities (no place to park a car , garages at $40 per night, and pedestrian zones that keep you out of the center.

And agree that there is no vehicle that will hold all of you and any amount of luggage. You would need 2 vans to hold 8 people plus luggage in any comfort.
nytraveler is offline  

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