10-11 days in Italy, do it or not ?

Sep 7th, 2017, 05:20 AM
  #1  
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10-11 days in Italy, do it or not ?

Hi !

for the last two years we've been in Europe(Germany, Spain and Portugal) with the kids for 26 days each time. We all get a great time but we must say that sometimes kids find those trip a bit boring and are tired of walking.

For next summer (july-agust 2018) we have thought about making a road trip around geart lakes USa (we are from Montreal) with the kids (6 and 10 years old) and do a 10-11 days trip in Italy just me and my wife. The gradparents would keep the kids for that time.

My question is, could a 10-11 days trip to Italy could be enjoy or it's really too short ? We have direct flight From Montreal to Venise or Rome. So maybe we could do something like Rome 5 nights , Florence 2 -3 nights and venise 2-3 nights.
tostaky is offline  
Sep 7th, 2017, 05:35 AM
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And why wouldn't 10+ days without the kids whinging all the time be enjoyable?
BigRuss is offline  
Sep 7th, 2017, 05:44 AM
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You could see all three cities if you added a few days to the trip. Otherwise, choose two of them.
HappyTrvlr is offline  
Sep 7th, 2017, 05:46 AM
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Of course 10 days can be enjoyable. That's all some of us get, and we damn sure enjoy it!
The key is to get good flights (i.e., pay more for direct or good times or whatever) and not overdo it. I would not necessarily do the schedule you have proposed (I prefer to focus on one area with a combo of city/village, etc.), but only you know your own travel style preference.
I'd also add that there is no reason a family vacation in Europe has to focus on intensive sightseeing in museums. We make nature a focus of most of our trips.
yorkshire is offline  
Sep 7th, 2017, 05:54 AM
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Thanks for those reply !

Of course when we travel with kids we keep the museums to a minimum or we choose museums kids could enjoy. Since the only speak french we also have to choose museum that doesn't need a lot of reading.

We also enjoy a combination of cities and villages, but with 10 days and being a first time in Italy we would like to see some highlight, enjoy good restaurants (we both are foodies) and walk a lot at our adult pace....well iM,s gonna be hot so we will see about the walking part !

Of course money wise we easily could add many days, but asking the grand parents to keep the kids for more than 2 weeks is a lot...and it will be too much time for us without them !

We are very open minded about the itinerary for that amount of time, so feel free to told us what you would do with that short amount of time
tostaky is offline  
Sep 7th, 2017, 05:55 AM
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Me and my wife. You meant my wife and myself ?

I can't answer actually my wife and I always take the kids with us.
If they complain we put them one night on the balcony.
Then they love the trip.
Whathello is offline  
Sep 7th, 2017, 06:32 AM
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More time is always better as far as I'm concerned, but 10-11 days would certainly let you get a nice taste of Italy and it IS possible to be enjoyable to go to Venice, Florence and Rome in that time period. A lot of people would say pick two and spend more time in each and maybe add a day trip from one or both (which I do think is a good idea) but if the 'big three' are what you want to see then go for it. Here's a trip report I did of a similar itinerary last year.

http://www.fodors.com/community/euro...n-in-march.cfm
isabel is online now  
Sep 7th, 2017, 06:38 AM
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Sure--go for it! Fly into Rome, fly out of Venice, or vice versa. I would budget the time as follows:

Rome four nites; Florence four nites--with a day trip to Siena or Lucca; Venice three nites.
dwdvagamundo is offline  
Sep 7th, 2017, 07:33 AM
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It is very considerate of you to limit your trip length for the sake of the grandparents! And I think you can have a great trip in that amount of time, going to all three cities.The transportation is so easy on that itinerary. In fact I am planning a similar trip for a friend of mine and they have 8 nights. Sure it would be nice to have a bit longer - maybe next time but you should be able to see some of the "A" list sights and also wander a bit as well. Just try to pre-book as many sights as you can to save yourself time.
suec1 is offline  
Sep 7th, 2017, 07:34 AM
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Oh yes, the open jaws suggestion of in one city and out the other will help maximize your time.
suec1 is offline  
Sep 7th, 2017, 07:53 AM
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It sounds like you are fortunate to travel often and will probably visit Italy with your children in the future. If that is the case, I would tailor it with that in mind--do the stuff you don't anticipate doing with them, etc. And keep in mind you don't necessarily have to squeeze in all three of those cities (which in July may be taking on a bit much). enjoy!
yorkshire is offline  
Sep 7th, 2017, 08:53 AM
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Once again thanks a lot !
Of course june would be better but i'm not in vacation at that time of year. My wife is a school psychologist and i'm a teacher so our vacations are in july-august.

I've chat a bit with a colleague who have been in Italy last year and she told me that Florence was not the best part she have seen. So maybe we could keep Venise and rome and add some daytrip or make a stop between those two (Bologna ?).

Open jaw is already the plan, and since Montreal have direct flight to and from Rome and venice many times by week I think we can say this is set.
tostaky is offline  
Sep 7th, 2017, 10:28 AM
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The fact that your friend didn't like Florence doesn't mean you won't like it. Florence is often terribly crowded, but if you go at a crowded time of the year, you can plan to see some of the things that don't attract thousands of tourists every day. There are many wonderful places in Florence that aren't inundated with visitors.

Another thing you could do, which I did when my young nieces were visiting me. We stopped off for six hours in Florence while on our way to Rome (not from Venice, but from our home in Le Marche). You pass right through Florence on the way (by train) from Venice to Rome. If you catch an early train from Venice to Florence, and a late train from Florence to Rome, you would have a chance at least to see the city, although I wouldn't visit the Uffizi or other large and crowded museums.

The train station is a short walk from the center of Florence.

Some things I would recommend on a very short visit to Florence.

The Basilica of Santa Maria Novella, very near the station, is practically a museum of Italian Renaissance art. It also has a very nice cloister.

The outside of the Duomo. There are long lines to get in, and the inside has very little of its original art. That art is mostly in the Museum of the Duomo, which is right nearby and might be worth a quick visit, depending on your interests.

The Baptistery of the Duomo. Most tourists stop to admire the famous carved door called the "Gates of Paradise", whose original is in the Museum of the Duomo. Not many people go inside, where there are beautiful golden medieval mosaics on the vaulted ceiling. The Baptistery is much older than the Duomo.

The Piazza della Signoria, and a walk along the Arno to the Ponte Vecchio, which you could cross if it's not sinking under the weight of the other tourists.

There are some other churches and museums you could choose, but you'd not have time for more than one. The Bargello is one of my favorite museums, with many Renaissance sculptures, including some by Michelangelo and Donatello. San Marco, which is a former monastery, now a museum, has monks' cells all decorated with frescoes by Il Beato Angelico (sometimes called Fra Angelico). Santa Maria del Carmine has more wonderful frescoes from the early Renaissance, including some by Masaccio.

If you want to spend more time in Florence, one night would give you nearly two full days, again leaving Venice early and leaving Florence late.

Three nights in Venice would give you a good introduction to the city, and five nights in Rome would also give you a good introduction. In all of these places, I'd try to minimize visits to the most popular sights, and maximize visits to the hidden gems. A little research will help with this.
bvlenci is offline  
Sep 7th, 2017, 11:08 AM
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Yes the classic trio of Venice - Florence and Rome - fly into one and out of the other - take trains in between -book early for discounted fares- much cheaper than walk-up full fares but resricted to a specific train on a specific day at a specific time - no changes allowed. For lots of info on Italian trains -www.trenitalia.com - www.seat61.com has great tips for getting that site to work to book your own online tickets; for general info www.ricksteves.com and www.budgeteuropetravel.com.

Yes Rome 5 nights and 3 in Florence and Venice if possible.
PalenQ is offline  
Sep 7th, 2017, 11:22 AM
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In July & August I would try to go someplace breezy & uncrowded in Italy that has beautiful artistic sights & fascinating historic sights. Incredibly, that is not hard to do if you pick the western Mediterranean area or the mountains.

I would head to Napoli, Salerno, Pasetum etc or Trento & the Dolomiti area + maybe Verona. (The last will be hot & muggy & with plenty of tourists, but you can quickly move on cooler & more uncrowded art cities)
massimop is offline  
Sep 7th, 2017, 12:36 PM
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Florence is one of the hottest cities in Italy, but Naples and Salerno are pretty hot, too.
bvlenci is offline  
Sep 7th, 2017, 12:42 PM
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Italy first time - do the big three crowds and all - you may never get back?

Everyplace of touristic interest in Italy is crowded in July and August. Yes June or September would be much better but...kids are in school probably...
PalenQ is offline  
Sep 7th, 2017, 12:50 PM
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I like this TR about Firenze. I fully agree with what WoinParis has written.

http://www.fodors.com/community/euro...nze-4-days.cfm
Whathello is offline  
Sep 7th, 2017, 01:01 PM
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The sea breezes of the coast make it much more pleasant to be in Naples/Salerno etc in in summer, especially in the evenings when temps drop & there are breezes. Even during the day the sea breezes moderate the temps in the shade. What is hot is to be standing in the sun -- but there is plenty of shade in the cities of the coast.

If you want to see Venice, Florence & Rome, by all means do. But I wouldn't let myself be scared into a hot, crowded experience of Italy on the premise "this might be it for you!!!!!"

Even if my one experience of Italy was its fabulously historic Mediterranean coast, filled with art, treasure, natural wonders -- and I never saw what everybody thought I ought to see (you'll be given a quiz), I don't think I'd be sorry. Many people who go to Venice, Florence & Rome (at any time of year) for a 1st rip to Italy don't actually enjoy the experience. They pat themselves on the back for having done the studious tour of the Renaissance/Catholic sighs, and supposedly "must-see" Venice -- but if they do get back to Italy & see the sea, the volcanoes, the Greek & Roman of the south, eat the pasta & the pizza, smell the lemons -- they find it incredible in a way that the "Big 3" wasn't for them.
massimop is offline  
Sep 7th, 2017, 01:25 PM
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they find it incredible in a way that the "Big 3" wasn't for them.>

But you never know unless you go - don't go and forever be wondering what if...

Too bad they do not have more time could mix other places in with Big Three.

But massimop makes a good point too - if just wanting to experience Italy then that encounter may be more enjoyable outside of mobbed sweltering hot cities even though wide swaths of those cities have few tourists too.

What is hot is to be standing in the sun -- but there is plenty of shade in the cities of the coast.>

Bring an umbrella? Or wide-brimmed light-hued large hat?
PalenQ is offline  

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