How old are cruisers?

Jul 18th, 2002, 06:07 AM
  #1  
Chris Dunn
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
How old are cruisers?


I have noticed people claiming that they are not elderly and then they explain what they like about ships. Words like “elderly” “old” “geezer” “middle aged” and “young” are very relative terms. What one person considers to be “old” may be middle age for others.

Is there any breakdown as to which age groups sail on which ships? For example, does Carnival have a passenger list something like:
30% less than 30 years old
40 % 30-40 years old
20 % 40-50 years old
5 % 50 – 60 years old
and 5% over sixty?

Does any such breakdown currently exist?

If not what is your feeling as to the break downs? This information might be helpful for some of the people who do not wish to be on ships with a large % of people over 60 years old, or under 30 years old, or some other criteria.

I assume that Disney has the highest percent of younger cruisers, but I have never seen any breakdown before.
 
Jul 18th, 2002, 06:09 AM
  #2  
Chuck
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I would like to know the answer too. I hate to be surrounded by a ship filled with people who are on their deathbed. I think that Holland America's lines must be pretty high up in the "old" category.
 
Jul 18th, 2002, 08:27 AM
  #3  
Lenore
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I would love to see this information too. All companies keep stats on the demographics of their passengers. I wonder if anyone has compiled them and would like to share??? It would be most helpful.
 
Jul 18th, 2002, 11:31 PM
  #4  
Paul Therault
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Some travel agents do have the information. Too many variables. Certainly can not print them all here. General rule is that exotic itineraries have the least amount of families. Also cruises originating from senior ports such as Tampa has a slew of elders.

On mass-market ships such as RCCL and Carnival the over 60 crowd is limited in the Caribbean.

Surprising to know that Disney, although short on elderly, does have an equal amount of single couples and couples with families.

Another rule of thumb is that the majority of families will not cruise the upscale (expensive) cruise lines starting with Holland America and working your way up.

Never think there are any elderly at all on the short cruises to the Caribbean.

Looking at one ship passenger profile as printed: RCCL Monarch of the Seas. Singles 30%; Couples to 35, 25%; Couples 35 to 55, 30%; Couples over 55, 0%; Families 15%.

Sovereign - short cruises: Singles 27%; Couples to 35, 25%; Couples 35 to 55, 35%; Couples over 55, 0% and Families 13%.

Now, if you take Holland America Rotterdam: Singles 5%; Couples to 35, 20%; Couples 35 to 55, 20%, Couples over 55, 20%, Families 15% and Other 20%.
So you see Holland is not really an "old fogies" cruseline but I do not know what the "other" category is. I would presume since it is not "pets" it must be those under 35.

That's enough for me.

Paul
 
Jul 27th, 2002, 10:02 PM
  #5  
michaelbuttons
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
This question pops up from time to time. I fly to London every winter for a week and noone ever asks if the plane is full of older passengers. I book shows there and the question does not come up. You who need such information probably are going to have other troubles on the ships as well. If the age group is a problem, food, service, landings and transfers are going to bother you as well. Only in American are these questions asked. I go as I please and do not vet my fellow passengers. I have never been disappointed. Travel information is hard to find on this forum, social problems are the subject mostly.
 
Jul 27th, 2002, 11:22 PM
  #6  
Paul Therault
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Hi Michael,

You're right about Americans being a critical bunch. But it is boring dicussing wine at every meeting.

Beg to differ with you on the content of this site. The majority deals with some very informative reviews and threads.

Read.

Paul
 
Jul 28th, 2002, 07:55 AM
  #7  
michbuttons
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Paul, friend, are you the list owner in disguise?

This forum seems to me to mostly generated by American writers. Travel by Americans is concerned with their comfort first and their needs first even when in the midst of someone else's homeland. The milk should be lo-fat and the lowliest employee should speak English. When cruising, the purser, now customer service is the mostinteresting place on board. Complaits are fielded here and most of them are so petty.

As to your wine remark, Mr. Paul, if you cannot assist in leading a conversation, I would happy for you to sit by yourself. You get out of a trip, as in life, what you put in. With small encouragement many fellow cruisers can be interesting to know. The major problem on this forum and on cruise is overwhelming self interest.
 
Jul 28th, 2002, 02:47 PM
  #8  
maryann
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I just love it when everyone thinks HAL is full of old fogeys, keeps the vomit out of the hot tub by all the "fun" people
 
Jul 28th, 2002, 08:25 PM
  #9  
Paul Therault
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Dear Michael,

You're much too serious. This is an interesting and fun site. When I stated the Europeans are discussing the type of wine, I didn't really mean that they were uninteresting conversationalists. I was attempting to point out that they are not discussing negative aspects of their vacation. With Americans it is a moot topic and we laugh about it.

You must realize that people like to be with others their own age. Chris asked a question that is very important to many. Oftentimes I hear from people that they were on a trip and the average age was 95. If it wasn't important they would not have mentioned it.

Europeans are, as you say, not as critical with creature comforts as Americans. This is why all old ships are transferred to to the European or Asian market. If you follow this forum you will see that Americans hate the ships. Canadians and Europeans love them. And also love the price.

There is much to learn from this Fodors' site. I, myself, have found it immensely informative.

I am bashed into oblivion on this site but it does not bother me. No one should take me as God. I can make mistakes as any other ordinary person. But I have traveled extensivly and what I do not have in memory, I do have at my fingertips. I do quite a bit of reasearch and am always learning.

I also agree with you that this is more of a social forum but there are many that really need this information. Where they err is that they word their posts incorrecrtly and end up being the butt of jokes fielded by those that get a kick out of teasing others. They are simply immature and do not see themselves that way.

You are again correct that I do not take the lead in conversation. I sit back and listen, learn and enjoy. When the time comes for me to interact, I do.

Now I have to ask you a question. Don't get offended, but aren't you doing a bit of complaining as with the rest of us?

I do enjoy your posts.

Paul
 
Jul 29th, 2002, 09:55 AM
  #10  
Michaelbuttons
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Yes, it probably does seem like complaining. I too have been around a bit but not in nice places as your must have been. Four to a jeep with a shoebox for your personals for months at a time and one get accustomed to the purpose of travel. It is what is brought home in the heart and in the mind. Here it is what can be had wrapped up in the gift boxes. I like cruise ships because I like slow quiet times in my life. I am seeing less and less of them because those that sail from the US are large (very bad) entertainment floaters. Visit a library recently. Try to find a computer that works? All the card players would cut your throat for fifty cents. Yes, European ships are easier on the soul and the traveler. I wanted to know things such as a clean room, competent staff, food for me needs only appear on time, etc.

BTW, I have never been on a trip when the age group averaged 95. I have amother in that age group and 95 year old people very seldom travel. Older people use cruise ships because they offer the ability for the older person to do some traveling without the need to transfer, haul luggage, fear new places on their own, etc.

That this exists should be celebrated by the tourist, not excoriated by sectioned parts of the population. I guess I said somewhere that I am not American born so loving the American who live around me and deal with me daily, I do make exception to the American traveler. Any Italian would help a man on crutches, even a thief would do that. The American abroad is, now I am one, a difficult person to serve and entertain. This forum could, suggestion perhaps, offer more hard travel information. Reference - NYTimes Q&A column on Sundays. Question followed by answers. No personalities.

Sorry for this length, I will stop posting now.
 
Jul 29th, 2002, 11:47 AM
  #11  
Peter
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
michaelbuttons - You and your posts sound like the people and types of posts you are preaching against. Don't see much useful travel info in your posts to this thread??
 
Jul 29th, 2002, 11:52 AM
  #12  
John
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Actually the above posts are funny. Who cares about 95 year olds? To me, 60 and above is old. if you do not think so, chances are that you are in that age category.

If you are retired, chances are that most people consider you old. This is the category that seems to enjoy being away from the rowdy bunch and the same category that the rowdy bunch enjoy irritating.

Unless you are hugh hefner, mick jagger etc, i think that you should consider 60 years old to be the cut off for old.
 
Jul 29th, 2002, 11:53 PM
  #13  
Paul Therault
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Hey John. I'm old, consider myself old and others consider me old but I am not about to hang out with the quiet crowd. I'm not dead.

Paul
 

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy -

FODOR'S VIDEO

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 01:51 AM.